72

One of my models has a deleted flag, which is used to hide objects globally:

class NondeletedManager(models.Manager):
    """Returns only objects which haven't been deleted"""

    def get_query_set(self):
        return super(NondeletedManager, self).get_query_set().exclude(deleted=True)

class Conversation(BaseModel):
    ...
    deleted = models.BooleanField(default=False)
    objects = NondeletedManager()
    all_conversations = models.Manager() # includes deleted conversations

How can I override the default queryset used by Django admin module to include deleted conversations?

  • Do you really need custom managers for those simple queries? – César Sep 10 '12 at 14:50
  • 3
    Yes, deleted objects should be ignored universally (except for on admin pages) so it makes sense to set a default. – Natan Yellin Sep 10 '12 at 14:53
132
0

You can override get_queryset method in your model admin class.

class MyModelAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):
    def get_queryset(self, request):
        qs = super(MyModelAdmin, self).get_queryset(request)
        if request.user.is_superuser:
            return qs
        return qs.filter(author=request.user)

Note in Django<=1.5 the method was named just queryset.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    How would that work in this case? Can I modify the queryset created by ModelAdmin.queryset to include deleted objects? I don't want to build the queryset myself instead of calling on the superclass. – Natan Yellin Sep 10 '12 at 15:02
  • Look at my answer to see what I mean. Is there an alternative to completely re-implementing the function? – Natan Yellin Sep 10 '12 at 15:26
  • 4
    It helps to actually put the answer in your answer, rather than just linking. That link is dead now, so I'll update to give an explanation. – Dan Mar 5 '14 at 20:48
  • 14
    On Django 1.6, this method was renamed to get_queryset. – Fernando Macedo Nov 27 '14 at 12:00
  • 1
    I was unable to get this working. I am getting an error saying that .filter is no in the qs object. Second, I am also unable to use queryset for anything other than request. stackoverflow.com/questions/54472649/… Any help? – Gary Feb 1 '19 at 6:21
8
0

Konrad is correct, but this is more difficult than the example given in the documentation.

Deleted conversations can't be included in a queryset that already excludes them. So I don't see an option other than re-implementing admin.ModelAdmin.queryset entirely.

class ConversationAdmin (admin.ModelAdmin):

    def queryset (self, request):
        qs = Conversation.all_conversations
        ordering = self.get_ordering(request)
        if ordering:
            qs = qs.order_by(*ordering)
        return qs
| improve this answer | |
  • I don't think there's anything wrong with that. Using two Managers is the way to go. It's true, however, that the Django admin could provide a hook so that you don't have to re-implement the ordering part. – Thomas Orozco Sep 10 '12 at 22:06
3
0

What would be so wrong with the following:

class Conversation(BaseModel):
    ...
    deleted = models.BooleanField(default=False)
    objects = models.Manager() # includes deleted conversations
    nondeleted_conversations = NondeletedManager()

So in your own apps/projects, you use Conversation.nondeleted_conversations() and let the built-in admin app do it's thing.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I'm ignoring deleted objects everywhere but the admin pages, so I think that should be the default. Furthermore, this way I don't need to update legacy code by adding the ability to delete conversations. – Natan Yellin Sep 10 '12 at 14:54
2
0

The accepted solution works great for me but I needed a little bit more flexibility, so I ended up extending the changelist view to add in a custom queryset parameter. I can now configure my default queryset/filter as such and it can still be modified by using a different filter (get parameters):

def changelist_view(self, request, extra_context=None):
    if len(request.GET) == 0 :
        q = request.GET.copy()
        q['status__gt'] = 4
        request.GET = q
        request.META['QUERY_STRING'] = request.GET.urlencode()

    return super(WorksheetAdmin,self).changelist_view(request, extra_context=extra_context)
| improve this answer | |
1
0

You can do this with a Django proxy model.

# models.py
class UnfilteredConversation(Conversation):
    class Meta:
        proxy = True

    # this will be the 'default manager' used in the Admin, and elsewhere
    objects = models.Manager() 

# admin.py
@admin.register(UnfilteredConversation)
class UnfilteredConversationAdmin(Conversation):
    # regular ModelAdmin stuff here
    ...

Or, if you have an existing ModelAdmin class you want to re-use:

admin.site.register(UnfilteredConversation, ConversationAdmin)

This approach avoids issues that can arise with overriding the default manager on the original Conversation model - because the default manager is also used in ManyToMany relationships and reverse ForeignKey relationships.

| improve this answer | |
1
0

Natan Yellin is correct, but you can change the managers order and the first will be the default, then it is the used by the admin:

class Conversation(BaseModel):
    ...
    deleted = models.BooleanField(default=False)

    all_conversations = models.Manager() # includes deleted conversations
    objects = NondeletedManager()

The admin implementation of get_queryset() use ._default_manager instead .objects, as show next

qs = self.model._default_manager.get_queryset()

ref Django github BaseModelAdmin implementation

This only ensures that every time you use YourModel.objects, you will not include deleted objects, but the generic views and others uses ._default_manager too. Then if you don't override get_queryset is not a solution. I've just check on a ListView and admin.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.