34

Is there a way in Ruby to take a symbol or string and turn it into a class of the same name?

For instance, if I have a class such as

class Bob
  def talk
     puts "Hi, I'm bob"
  end
end

And a method I have somewhere else in the code is passed a symbol :bob, can I in some way turn that into the class Bob? Maybe something like

b = :Bob.new
b.talk

Or is there a way to do something similar to this?

53

There are many ways to do this. Your lack of context makes it impossible to elect a "best" way. Here's a few ayways.

Kernel.const_get(:Bob)

eval(:Bob.to_s)

Kernel.const_get(:bob.to_s.capitalize)
  • 4
    Well, thankfully I didn't ask for the "best" way, but just a way... ;) – intargc Aug 5 '09 at 22:16
  • 9
    just for the case, if Bob is defined in module People and you know it, you can People.const_get(:Bob) – phil pirozhkov Oct 18 '12 at 19:23
40

Rails

For use with Rails only.

With a string:

"Module".constantize #=> Module
"Class".constantize #=> Class

With a symbol:

:module.to_s.classify.constantize #=> Module
:open_struct.to_s.classify.constantize #=> OpenStruct

If you are dealing with a multi-word symbol, then you'll want to add #classify to the chain to properly handle the capitalization of all the parts of the constant.

http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveSupport/Inflector.html#method-i-constantize

  • 8
    Sorry, I should probably add that this is a Rails only thing. – Dan Frade Aug 5 '09 at 20:55
  • 1
    If you're using Rails this is probably the best solution. – superluminary Jun 11 '13 at 9:23
  • 1
    The question specifically asks about symbols and constantize does not exist on the Symbol class in Rails. Answer should be :Module.to_s.constantize. – tjbp Aug 10 '16 at 12:04
10

None of the solutions I've seen work if you want to turn :foo_bar into FooBar. If that's what you're looking for:

:foo_bar.to_s.split("_").collect(&:capitalize).join.constantize
=> FooBar

hope that helps someone.

5

NameSpace.const_get(classname) will return the class object (assuming that classname contains the name of a class - if it contains the name of a constant that is not a class, it will return the value of that constant). The toplevel namespace is Object, so you can do Object.const_get(:Bob).new

3
class Bob
end

def create(name)
  return eval("#{name}.new")
end

b = create(:Bob)
puts b.class
2

Here is something that I came up with while looking for something similar that included module/namespace support:

['foo', 'bar'].inject {|r,e| "#{r.classify}::#{e.classify}"}.constantize

Produces

=> Foo::Bar

However this requires Rails and of course it only works where the array has more than one element.

This seems rather simple so I'm sure I'm missing something out, would anyone care to advise why this wouldn't be a good approach?

Thanks!

  • Are you asking a question inside of an answer? For shame! ;) – JustinStolle Aug 21 '12 at 0:18
  • @JustinStolle, I don't think its a new question, more guidance regarding to the original question? :) – Joe Sep 18 '12 at 23:03
0

in my case, both example below worked, but you also have not to forget namespace:

  Object.const_get("ModuleName::#{class_model_name}")

or

  Kernel.const_get("ModuleName::#{class_model_name}").

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