9

This:

label := string([]byte{97, 98, 99, 0, 0, 0, 0})
fmt.Printf("%s\n", label)

does this (^@ is the null-byte):

go run test.go 
abc^@^@^@
0

5 Answers 5

16

There's this function hidden inside Go's syscall package that finds the first null byte ([]byte{0}) and returns the length. I'm assuming it's called clen for C-Length.

Sorry I'm a year late on this answer, but I think it's a lot simpler than the other two (no unnecessary imports, etc.)

func clen(n []byte) int {
    for i := 0; i < len(n); i++ {
        if n[i] == 0 {
            return i
        }
    }
    return len(n)
}

So,

label := []byte{97, 98, 99, 0, 0, 0, 0}
s := label[:clen(label)]
fmt.Println(string(s))

What that ^ says is to set s to the slice of bytes in label from the beginning to the index of clen(label).

The result would be abc with a length of 3.

4
  • 1
    This is actually the cleanest, simplest and more efficient solution. Feb 7, 2015 at 19:47
  • 1
    And, unlike the string.Index answer, this won't panic if the provided []byte does not contain a zero byte.
    – Dave C
    Apr 19, 2015 at 13:53
  • This is the only correct solution so far. This should be the accepted answer.
    – snap
    Sep 16, 2018 at 21:37
  • I'm getting "clen" undefined and "imported and not used: syscall"
    – rosstex
    May 15, 2020 at 18:39
12

Note that the first answer will only work with strings that have only a run of zeroes after the null terminator; however, a proper C-style null-terminated string ends at the first \0 even if it's followed by garbage. For example, []byte{97,98,99,0,99,99,0} should be parsed as abc, not abc^@cc.

To properly parse this, use string.Index, as follows, to find the first \0 and use it to slice the original byte-slice:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "strings"
)

func main() {
    label := []byte{97,98,99,0,99,99,0}
    nullIndex := strings.Index(string(label), "\x00")
    if (nullIndex < 0) {
        fmt.Println("Buffer did not hold a null-terminated string")
        os.Exit(1)
    }
    fmt.Println(string(label[:nullIndex]))
}

EDIT: Was printing the shortened version as a []byte instead of as a string. Thanks to @serbaut for the catch.

EDIT 2: Was not handling the error case of a buffer without a null terminator. Thanks to @snap for the catch.

4
  • 2
    Shouldnt that be string(label[:bytes.IndexByte(label, 0)])?
    – serbaut
    Nov 14, 2012 at 22:23
  • @serbaut, you're very correct; should have run that in play, and I would have noticed the []byte formatting. Edited
    – azernik
    Mar 6, 2013 at 5:42
  • 1
    This panics if the input does not contain nul terminator. Not nice.
    – snap
    Sep 16, 2018 at 21:36
  • @snap Good catch! Editing my answer.
    – azernik
    Sep 22, 2018 at 22:03
1

You can use the sys package:

package main
import "golang.org/x/sys/windows"

func main() {
   b := []byte{97, 98, 99, 0, 0, 0, 0}
   s := windows.ByteSliceToString(b)
   println(s == "abc")
}

Or you can just implement it yourself:

package main
import "bytes"

func byteSliceToString(s []byte) string {
   n := bytes.IndexByte(s, 0)
   if n >= 0 {
      s = s[:n]
   }
   return string(s)
}

func main() {
   b := []byte{97, 98, 99, 0, 0, 0, 0}
   s := byteSliceToString(b)
   println(s == "abc")
}
1

1. strings .TrimSpace .TrimRight

//trim tail '\0', but can't handle bytes like "abc\x00def\x00".

can't edit @orelli answer, so wrote here:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "strings"
)

func main() {
    label := string([]byte{97, 98, 99, 0, 0, 0, 0})

    s1 := strings.TrimSpace(label)
    fmt.Println(len(s1), s1)

    s2 := strings.TrimRight(label, "\x00")
    fmt.Println(len(s2), s2)
  }

output:

7 abc????
3 abc

// ? is '\0' which can't display here.


So
.TrimSpace can't trim '\0', but
.TrimRight with "\x00" can.



2. bytes.IndexByte

search for first '\0', maybe not support utf-8

package main

import (
    "bytes"
    "fmt"
    "strings"
)

func main() {
    b_arr := []byte{97, 98, 99, 0, 100, 0, 0}
    label := string(b_arr)

    s1 := strings.TrimSpace(label)
    fmt.Println(len(s1), s1)   //7 abc?d??

    s2 := strings.TrimRight(label, "\x00")
    fmt.Println(len(s2), s2)   //5 abc?d

    n := bytes.IndexByte([]byte(label), 0)
    fmt.Println(n, label[:n])  //3 abc

    s_arr := b_arr[:bytes.IndexByte(b_arr, 0)]
    fmt.Println(len(s_arr), string(s_arr)) //3 abc
}

equivalent

n1 := bytes.IndexByte(b_arr, 0)
n2 := bytes.Index(b_arr, []byte{0})

n3, c := 0, byte(0)
for n3, c = range b_arr {
    if c == 0 {
        break
    }
}
0

You can use bytes.SplitN and have it return the first subslice:

import (
    "bytes"
)

func bytesToStr(in []byte) string {
    str := bytes.SplitN(in, []byte{0}, 2)[0]
    return string(str)
}

In go 1.18+, you can also use bytes.Cut:

func bytesToStr(in []byte) string {
    str, _, _ := bytes.Cut(in, []byte{0})
    return string(str)
}

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