Does NodeList support addEventListener. If not what is the best way to add EventListener to all the nodes of the NodeList. Currently I am using the code snippet as show below, is there a better way to do this.

var ar_coins = document.getElementsByClassName('coins');
for(var xx=0;xx < ar_coins.length;xx++)
{
        ar_coins.item(xx).addEventListener('dragstart',handleDragStart,false);
}
  • 1
    Loop is needed. – Diode Sep 11 '12 at 3:28
  • 2
    While I know that jQuery isn't the answer for everything, it does make these sorts of issues moot: $('.coins').on('dragstart', handleDragStart); – zzzzBov Sep 11 '12 at 3:57
up vote 26 down vote accepted

There is no way to do it without looping through every element. You could, of course, write a function to do it for you.

function addEventListenerList(list, event, fn) {
    for (var i = 0, len = list.length; i < len; i++) {
        list[i].addEventListener(event, fn, false);
    }
}

var ar_coins = document.getElementsByClassName('coins');
addEventListenerList(ar_coins, 'dragstart', handleDragStart); 

or a more specialized version:

function addEventListenerByClass(className, event, fn) {
    var list = document.getElementsByClassName(className);
    for (var i = 0, len = list.length; i < len; i++) {
        list[i].addEventListener(event, fn, false);
    }
}

addEventListenerByClass('coins', 'dragstart', handleDragStart); 

And, though you didn't ask about jQuery, this is the kind of stuff that jQuery is particularly good at:

$('.coins').on('dragstart', handleDragStart);
  • Be careful, getElementsByClassName returns a live node list. – Salman Abbas Jan 11 '15 at 8:27
  • 3
    @SalmanPK - that shouldn't matter here. The result of getElementsByClassName() is used immediately and not stored so there is no opportunity for it to change while it is being used. – jfriend00 Jan 11 '15 at 8:29

There actually is a way to do this without a loop:

[].forEach.call(nodeList,function(e){e.addEventListener('click',callback,false)})

And this way is used in one of my one-liner helper libraries - nanoQuery.

  • 40
    This is looping, dude.. – Rufus May 8 '13 at 7:35
  • 7
    This doesn't use loop-control constructs and odd variables. – Multiversum Jul 3 '13 at 9:30
  • 8
    Even if you argue that it is still a loop, this is pretty badass. Thank you. – skribbz14 Nov 20 '15 at 22:07
  • 5
    this is some sexy code my friend – elloM8 Feb 19 '16 at 17:43
  • 10
    Maybe it saves you a few keystrokes, but it costs the next developer an extra few minutes to understand. Net loss. – sarink Jul 4 '16 at 9:32

The best I could come up with was this:

const $coins = document.querySelectorAll('.coins')
[...$coins].forEach($coin => $coin.addEventListener('dragstart', handleDragStart));

Note that this uses ES6 features, so please make sure to transpile it first!

  • Delicious... :-) – Marco Faustinelli Aug 30 '17 at 16:39
  • 1
    Super-clean - and two years on, less need for transpiling with more browser ES6 support. – Velojet Oct 5 '17 at 3:10

in es6, you can do a array from nodelist, using Array.from, e.g.

ar_coins = document.getElementsByClassName('coins');
Array
 .from(ar_coins)
 .forEach(addEvent)

function addEvent(element) {
  element.addEventListener('click', callback)
}

or just use arrow functions

Array
  .from(ar_coins)
  .forEach(element => element.addEventListener('click', callback))
  • Your arrow function needs a closing parenthesis at the very end to work. Cheers. – Brian Zelip Mar 22 '17 at 10:59
  • 1
    thanks @BrianZ, I really forget :D – Darlan Mendonça Mar 22 '17 at 14:35
  • BEST!!!! cleanest! Works! – Tithos Sep 29 at 20:54

The simplest example is to add this functionality to NodeList

NodeList.prototype.addEventListener = function (event_name, callback, useCapture)
{
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++)
    {
      this[i].addEventListener(event_name, callback, useCapture);
    }
};

Now you can do:

document.querySelectorAll(".my-button").addEventListener("click", function ()
{
    alert("Hi");
});

In the same way, you can do a forEach loop

NodeList.prototype.forEach = function (callback)
{
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++)
    {
      callback(this[i], i);
    }
};

Using:

document.querySelectorAll(".buttons").forEach(function (element, id)
{
    input.addEventListener("change", function ()
    {
        alert("button: " + id);
    });
});

EDIT : note that NodeList.prototype.forEach has existed ever since november 2016 in FF. No IE support though

I suppose another option would be to define addEventListener on NodeList using Object.defineProperty. That way you can treat the NodeList as you would a single Node.

As an example, I created a jsfiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/2LQbe/

The key point is this:

Object.defineProperty(NodeList.prototype, "addEventListener", {
    value: function (event, callback, useCapture) {
        useCapture = ( !! useCapture) | false;
        for (var i = 0; i < this.length; ++i) {
            if (this[i] instanceof Node) {
                this[i].addEventListener(event, callback, useCapture);
            }
        }
        return this;
    }
});
  • I upvoted this answer because (1) it answers the question, (2) it is different than the other answers, (3) it is clever, and (4) it may be what someone is looking for. However, I have to say that anything that modifies the prototype of one of the core Javascript objects makes me nervous. – Andrew Willems Feb 25 '16 at 4:48
  • @AndrewWillems Thanks! And I understand the general concern of modifying native prototypes, but I view it as similar to extending a class from a lib you don't own. :) – Duncan Feb 27 '16 at 11:26

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