30

Every allocator class must have an interface similar to the following:

template<class T>
class allocator
{
    ...
    template<class Other>
    struct rebind { typedef allocator<Other> other; };
};

And classes that use allocators do something redundant like this:

template<class T, class Alloc = std::allocator<T> >
class vector { ... };

But why is this necessary?

In other words, couldn't they have just said:

template<class T>
class allocator { ... };

template<class T, template<class> class Alloc = std::allocator>
class vector { ... };

which is both more elegant, less redundant, and (in some similar situations) potentially safer?
Why did they go the rebind route, which also causes more redundancy (i.e. you have to say T twice)?

(Similar question goes to char_traits and the rest... although they don't all have rebind, they could still benefit from template template parameters.)


Edit:

But this won't work if you need more than 1 template parameter!

Actually, it works very well!

template<unsigned int PoolSize>
struct pool
{
    template<class T>
    struct allocator
    {
        T pool[PoolSize];

        ...
    };
};

Now if vector was only defined this way:

template<class T, template<class> class Alloc>
class vector { ... };

Then you could just say:

typedef vector<int, pool<1>::allocator> int_vector;

And it would work perfectly well, without needing you to (redundantly) say int twice.

And a rebind operation inside vector would just become Alloc<Other> instead of Alloc::template rebind<Other>::other.

6
  • 3
    Note that in C++11 the requirement is relaxed and std::allocator_traits<SomeAllocator<T, Args...>>::rebind_alloc<U> is SomeAllocator<U, Args...> as a sensible default if SomeAllocator doesn't provide rebind. – Luc Danton Sep 11 '12 at 3:58
  • To the last point in the edit: How ugly the rebinding operation looks inside the vector implementation is irrelevant. You, the implementer, have the burden of making things easy for the user, even if it means very ugly and convoluted code under the hood. If you can bury the ugliness into the implementation to leave a cleaner interface, it is your job to do so. – Mikael Persson Sep 11 '12 at 4:34
  • @MikaelPersson: Sure, but is it even easier for the user? (How so? Examples/comparisons would be helpful! :D) – user541686 Sep 11 '12 at 4:35
  • @BoPersson: Uh, you just specialize... template<class> class my_special_allocator; template<> class my_special_allocator<my_type> { ... }; and then pass in my_special_allocator. Given that rebind's implementation would likely need a template anyway, you have to actively avoid this in order for it to be a problem. But if you're insisting on not using templates at all, well, then you're missing the point... the "T" in STL is there for a reason! And AFAIK this kind of use is the whole point of template template parameters in the first place... right? – user541686 Sep 11 '12 at 7:45
  • The truth may be disappointing. The template rebinding idiom may just have been easier to implement with older compilers. I found template template argument passing only in newer STL code. So it is not that the implementors just not like template template arguments in general. What I personally like about template template arguments is that a specific intention is already visible at the interface level after only syntactical analysis, i.e. pass a kind of strategy for internal private generic use. – Patrick Fromberg Nov 13 '13 at 2:14
22

A quoted text from Foundations of Algorithms in C++11, Volume 1, chap 4, p. 35 :

template <typename T> 
struct allocator 
{  
   template <typename U>  
   using  rebind = allocator<U>; 
}; 

sample usage :

allocator<int>::rebind<char> x;

In The C++ Programming Language, 4th edition, section 34.4.1, p. 998, commenting the 'classical' rebind member in default allocator class :

template<typename U>
     struct rebind { using other = allocator<U>;};

Bjarne Stroustrup writes this:

The curious rebind template is an archaic alias. It should have been:

template<typename U>
using other = allocator<U>;

However, allocator was defined before such aliases were supported by C++.

1
  • 2
    +1 for citing stroustrup, by the way your link is broken – odinthenerd Feb 16 '14 at 18:36
13

But why is this necessary?

What if your allocator class has more than one template argument?

That's pretty much it in terms of why it is generally discouraged to use template template arguments, in favor of using normal template arguments, even if it means a bit of redundancy at the instantiation site. In many cases (however, probably not for allocators), that argument might not always be a class template (e.g., a normal class with template member functions).

You might find it convenient (within the implementation of the container class) to use a template template parameter just because it simplifies some of the internal syntax. However, if the user has a multi-argument class template as an allocator he wants to use, but you require the user to provide an allocator which is a single-argument class template, you will in effect force him to create a wrapper for almost any new context in which he must use that allocator. This not only unscalable, it can also become very inconvenient to do. And, at this point, that solution is far from being the "elegant and less redundant" solution you originally thought it would be. Say you had an allocator with two arguments, which of the following is the easiest for the user?

std::vector<T, my_allocator<T,Arg2> > v1;

std::vector<T, my_allocator_wrapper<Arg2>::template type > v2;

You basically force the user to construct a lot of useless things (wrappers, template aliases, etc.) just to satisfy your implementation's demands. Requiring the author of a custom allocator class to supply a nested rebind template (which is just a trivial template alias) is far easier than all the contortions you require with the alternative approach.

4
  • "What if your allocator class has more than one template argument?" How about template<class P1, class P2> struct my_allocator_with_args { template<class T> my_allocator { ... }; };... now you just pass around my_allocator_with_args<Foo, Bar>::my_allocator as a template template parameter. – user541686 Sep 11 '12 at 4:10
  • Btw, this answer is a dupe of David's answer. (It's also a dupe of someone else's answer, but he deleted it pretty quickly.) – user541686 Sep 11 '12 at 4:19
  • Thanks, now see my edits. ;) If you still think it's a worse option, could you please edit your answer to include the "unscalable" case, and what the equivalent "scalable" version would be when we're using rebind instead? I think one of us is missing something. :) – user541686 Sep 11 '12 at 4:32
  • Btw, after you finish coming up with an example ;) there's another question: if this wasn't the kind of problem template template parameters were intended to solve, then what is their purpose in the first place? – user541686 Sep 11 '12 at 4:45
5

In your approach you are forcing the allocator to be a template with a single parameter, which might not be always the case. In many cases, allocators can be non-template, and the nested rebind can return the same type of the allocator. In other cases the allocator can have extra template arguments. This second case is the case of std::allocator<> which as all templates in the standard library is allowed to have extra template arguments as long as the implementation provides default values. Also note that the existence of rebind is optional in some cases, where allocator_traits can be used to obtain the rebound type.

The standard actually mentions that the nested rebind is actually just a templated typedef:

§17.6.3.5/3 Note A: The member class template rebind in the table above is effectively a typedef template. [ Note: In general, if the name Allocator is bound to SomeAllocator<T>, then Allocator::rebind<U>::other is the same type as SomeAllocator<U>, where someAllocator<T>::value_type is T and SomeAllocator<U>::value_type is U. — end note ] If Allocator is a class template instantiation of the form SomeAllocator<T, Args>, where Args is zero or more type arguments, and Allocator does not supply a rebind member template, the standard allocator_traits template uses SomeAllocator<U, Args> in place of Allocator:: rebind<U>::other by default. For allocator types that are not template instantiations of the above form, no default is provided.

16
  • As far as I can see, the number of template parameters couldn't have possibly been an issue -- if you need a different number of parameters then you can just make a wrapper that only needs 1 parameter, which is pretty darn easy and safer/less redundant than having rebind, right? – user541686 Sep 11 '12 at 3:59
  • @Mehrdad: you need to create a wrapper, actually more like N wrappers, possibly a lot of them, one for each possible combination of all other arguments that are used in the program, where in each wrapper all the other arguments would be bound to some value – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 11 '12 at 4:01
  • I don't understand why you say N... could you elaborate/give an example? – user541686 Sep 11 '12 at 4:04
  • @Mehrdad: Given a templated allocator that takes two arguments, T and Arg, how can you create a single one argument wrapper with an argument T for all possible values of Arg? – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 11 '12 at 4:05
  • Uh, nested template classes? The outer one takes Arg, the inner one takes T. You pass around the inner one as a template template parameter... achieves the same exact goals as before, gives you the number of template args you need, but still works the way you need it to. template<class P1, class P2> struct my_allocator_with_args { template<class T> my_allocator { ... }; };... now you just pass around my_allocator_with_args<Foo, Bar>::my_allocator as a template template parameter. I don't see where the N comes in. – user541686 Sep 11 '12 at 4:07
0

Suppose you want to write a function taking all sorts of vectors.

Then it is much more convenient being able to write

template <class T, class A>
void f (std::vector <T, A> vec) {
   // ...
}

than having to write

template <class T, template <class> class A>
void f (std::vector <T, A> vec) {
   // ...
}

In most of the cases, such a function does not care about the allocator anyway.

Further note that allocators are not required to be a template. You could write separate classes for particular types that need to be allocated.

An even more convenient way of designing allocators would probably have been

struct MyAllocator { 
   template <class T>
   class Core {
      // allocator code here
   };
};

Then it would have been possible to write

std::vector <int, MyAllocator> vec;

rather than the somewhat misleading expression

std::vector <int, MyAllocator<int> > vec;

I am not sure whether the above MyAllocator is permitted to be used as an allocator after adding a rebind, i.e. whether the following is a valid allocator class:

struct MyAllocator { 
   template <class T>
   class Core {
      // allocator code here
   };

   template <class T>
   struct rebind { using other=Core<T>; };
};
1
  • JhonB,why not just using other = core<T> without struct? – RaGa__M Dec 21 '16 at 6:48

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