28

I know about

date -d @<timestamp in seconds>

and

awk '{print strftime("%c", <timestamp in seconds>)}'

but what if I have milliseconds. Is there trivial way to do this without dropping the final three characters of the millisecond-timestamp (not that dropping characters is difficult, but I would think there'd be a one-step way for such a straightforward task)?

25
0

Instead of dropping characters, you could divide by 1000:

awk '{print strftime("%c", ( <timestamp in milliseconds> + 500 ) / 1000 )}'

Or:

date -d @$(  echo "(MilliSecondTimeStamp + 500) / 1000" | bc)

Edit: Adjusted for the quotients instead of division. Edit2: Thx zeekvfu, fixed.

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  • Didn't realize the awk solution would work after seeing the output of division in scientific notation. – jonderry Sep 11 '12 at 18:44
  • 1
    The date command doesn't work at all. The correct answer should be date -d @$(echo "(millisecond_timestamp+500)/1000" | bc). – zeekvfu Jul 19 '14 at 4:16
  • 1
    can you guys tell me what's bad with going like this: echo $(( ${MilliSecondTimeStamp} / 1000 )) ? – Alex Feb 1 '17 at 16:23
  • 2
    Dividing by 1000 will round wrong. In shell, the floor integer will be the answer. 3800 / 1000 will be 3, and not 4. – joepd Feb 1 '17 at 17:04
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    So it is just a very basic ceil() function? – Bowi Sep 17 '19 at 9:08
15
0
perl -e 'print scalar localtime(<timestamp> / 1000)'
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  • Very useful for viewing csv data that has a timestamp: cat mydata.csv | perl -pe 's{(\d{13})}{print scalar localtime($1/1000)}ge' – Sridhar Sarnobat Dec 22 '16 at 19:43
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    Actually I found that the "print" word was screwing up the order of the fields. Simply remove the print keyword, i.e. cat mydata.csv | perl -pe 's{(\d{13})}{scalar localtime($1/1000)}ge' – Sridhar Sarnobat Dec 27 '16 at 5:39
15
0

What I have in my bash profile on Mac:

day() {
  date -r $(($1 / 1000))
}

day 1486743904359 returns Fri Feb 10 08:25:04 PST 2017

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  • 3
    In my copy of date (GNU coreutils date, 8.26), the -r option is -r, --reference=FILE ... display the last modification time of FILE. I used your bash arithmetic with Kugelman's date invocation and got the result I needed. – daveloyall Aug 31 '17 at 21:14
0
0

Expanding on Greg's perl approach, I use this Perl script https://github.com/moose1089/epoch2iso to automatically scan for epoch timestamps and convert to ISO8061.

This script handles both seconds and milliseconds.

As it as it converts any number it finds, you don't have to extract the specific field with the timestamps, but conversely it might also convert numbers that were not intended to be times.

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0
0

This works great for me in bash and it's a bit simpler than the accepted answer above:

date -r $(( (<timestamp in milliseconds> + 500) / 1000 ))
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