31

Is there any way to accomplish the following in Wordpress with $wpdb->insert or

$wpdb->query($wpdb->prepare)):

INSERT into TABLE (column1, column2, column3) 
VALUES
('value1', 'value2', 'value3'),
('otherval1', 'otherval2', 'otherval3'),
('anotherval1', 'anotherval2', 'anotherval3')

...etc

  • Well there doesn't seem to be a syntax in the Wordpress documentation that accounts for this situation – djt Sep 11 '12 at 16:26
  • WordPress isn't really built as a framework for interfacing with the database, so functions like this don't exist. If you don't want to write it yourself, looping and using insert is your best bet. – jeremyharris Sep 11 '12 at 16:32
  • Also, I just scanned through the wpdb class and didn't find any methods that insert multiple rows, so you'll have to do it using one of the two methods above. – jeremyharris Sep 11 '12 at 16:34
  • OK i think I figured it out. Answer below – djt Sep 11 '12 at 17:23
  • Cool, glad you got it working. Make sure to accept the answer so others know it's solved :) – jeremyharris Sep 11 '12 at 19:45
72

OK, I figured it out!

Setup arrays for Actual Values, and Placeholders

$values = array();
$place_holders = array();

the initial Query:

$query = "INSERT INTO orders (order_id, product_id, quantity) VALUES ";

Then loop through the the values you're looking to add, and insert them in the appropriate arrays:

foreach ( $_POST as $key => $value ) {
     array_push( $values, $value, $order_id );
     $place_holders[] = "('%d', '%d')" /* In my case, i know they will always be integers */
}

Then add these bits to the initial query:

$query .= implode( ', ', $place_holders );
$wpdb->query( $wpdb->prepare( "$query ", $values ) );
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    Awesome, and use '%s' if you need to insert a string. – andrewthong May 27 '13 at 18:37
  • 2
    "Both %d and %s should be left unquoted in the query string." – malletjo Mar 13 '17 at 21:07
19

You can also use this way to build the query:

$values = array();

// We're preparing each DB item on it's own. Makes the code cleaner.
foreach ( $items as $key => $value ) {
    $values[] = $wpdb->prepare( "(%d,%d)", $key, $value );
}

$query = "INSERT INTO orders (order_id, product_id, quantity) VALUES ";
$query .= implode( ",\n", $values );
| improve this answer | |
5

I have came across with this problem and decided to build a more improved function by using accepted answer too:

/**
 * A method for inserting multiple rows into the specified table
 * 
 *  Usage Example: 
 *
 *  $insert_arrays = array();
 *  foreach($assets as $asset) {
 *
 *  $insert_arrays[] = array(
 *  'type' => "multiple_row_insert",
 *  'status' => 1,
 *  'name'=>$asset,
 *  'added_date' => current_time( 'mysql' ),
 *  'last_update' => current_time( 'mysql' ));
 *
 *  }
 *
 *  wp_insert_rows($insert_arrays);
 *
 *
 * @param array $row_arrays
 * @param string $wp_table_name
 * @return false|int
 *
 * @author  Ugur Mirza ZEYREK
 * @source http://stackoverflow.com/a/12374838/1194797
 */

function wp_insert_rows($row_arrays = array(), $wp_table_name) {
    global $wpdb;
    $wp_table_name = esc_sql($wp_table_name);
    // Setup arrays for Actual Values, and Placeholders
    $values = array();
    $place_holders = array();
    $query = "";
    $query_columns = "";

    $query .= "INSERT INTO {$wp_table_name} (";

            foreach($row_arrays as $count => $row_array)
            {

                foreach($row_array as $key => $value) {

                    if($count == 0) {
                        if($query_columns) {
                        $query_columns .= ",".$key."";
                        } else {
                        $query_columns .= "".$key."";
                        }
                    }

                    $values[] =  $value;

                    if(is_numeric($value)) {
                        if(isset($place_holders[$count])) {
                        $place_holders[$count] .= ", '%d'";
                        } else {
                        $place_holders[$count] .= "( '%d'";
                        }
                    } else {
                        if(isset($place_holders[$count])) {
                        $place_holders[$count] .= ", '%s'";
                        } else {
                        $place_holders[$count] .= "( '%s'";
                        }
                    }
                }
                        // mind closing the GAP
                        $place_holders[$count] .= ")";
            }

    $query .= " $query_columns ) VALUES ";

    $query .= implode(', ', $place_holders);

    if($wpdb->query($wpdb->prepare($query, $values))){
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }

}

Source: https://github.com/mirzazeyrek/wp-multiple-insert

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Please note that this will fail if $row_arrays argument is an associative array, because if($count == 0) assumes it is indexed with numbers starting from 0. Not very good, to rely on assumptions, that are not even documented. Would be better to use a different method to differentiate the first row. – sbnc.eu Jan 25 '19 at 15:24
  • Thank you for the comment @Grapestain. There is an explanation in the docblock and there are other examples in the github repository. Would you like to give an example what kind of scenario would case a fail for the method ? – mirza Jan 25 '19 at 18:34
  • This would fail: wp_insert_rows([ 'row1' => ['prop1', 'prop2'], 'row2' => ['propA', 'propB'] ] , 'my_table') or this would fail: wp_insert_rows([ 1 => ['prop1', 'prop2'], 2 => ['propA', 'propB'] ] , 'my_table') while this would succeed: wp_insert_rows([ ['prop1', 'prop2'], ['propA', 'propB'] ] , 'my_table') Not a big issue, I'm just surprised by the $count == 0 condition, when it is not said that the input array must not be associative (i.e. must not use custom keys). I'd never do that, as it means the function relies on an assumption, which is not enforced. – sbnc.eu Jan 26 '19 at 15:03
2

In addition to inserting multiple rows using $wpdb, if you ever need to update existing rows following snippet should be helpful. This is updated snippet of what @philipp provided above.

$values = array();

// We're preparing each DB item on it's own. Makes the code cleaner.
foreach ( $items as $key => $value ) {
    $values[] = $wpdb->prepare( "(%d,%d)", $key, $value );
}

$values = implode( ",\n", $values );
$query = "INSERT INTO orders (order_id, product_id, quantity) VALUES {$values} ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE `quantity` = VALUES(quantity)";
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    haven't tested this solution but I'm giving +1 for the use of ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE. – HPWD Apr 5 at 20:46
  • 1
    @HPWD I have. It works well. You could alternatively use array_map instead of the loop. (I don't know if it is MySQL specific, but note that the VALUES() syntax to refer to the would-be new values is deprecated as of MySQL 8.0.20, but as of 8.0.19 an alias can be used instead.) – Jake Oct 5 at 1:48
-5

This is a bit late, but you could also do it like this.

    global $wpdb;
    $table_name = $wpdb->prefix . 'your_table';

    foreach ($your_array as $key => $value) {
          $result = $wpdb->insert( 
            $table_name, 
            array( 
              'colname_1' => $value[0], 
              'colname_2' => $value[1], 
              'colname_3' => $value[2], 
            ) 
          );
        }
  if (!$result) {
    print 'There was a error';
  }
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    This will execute several INSERTs of a single row instead of a single INSERT of multiple rows. Also, will detect errors only for the last insert. – Bruno Ferreira Nov 25 '16 at 19:22
-8

not very nice, but if you know what you are doing:

require_once('wp-load.php');
mysql_connect(DB_HOST, DB_USER, DB_PASSWORD);  
@mysql_select_db(DB_NAME) or die();
mysql_query("INSERT into TABLE ('column1', 'column2', 'column3') VALUES 
                               ('value1', 'value2', 'value3'), 
                               ('otherval1', 'otherval2', 'otherval3'),
                               ('anotherval1', 'anotherval2', 'anotherval3)");
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    -1 This is a terrible solution. Please stop using the ancient mysql_ functions. They are soon to be deprecated. – kapa Oct 27 '12 at 17:36
  • 5
    I would also suggest to stop using or die(), it's a horrible way of handling errors. – Diego Oct 3 '13 at 12:12

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