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Hi I am trying to create a generic method that takes in a parameter which type is an abstract parameterised class. Inside the method I want to create a instances of the passed parameter given it is a subclass of the abstract type since we cannot instantiate abstract classes.

However I am having some issues. And the error message says the RuleType cannot be resolved to a type which is not surprising anyway but I don’t know how can I accomplish this. My current code is below.

private <F extends AbstractRule<T>, T> void applyRyle(F cRule,ArrayList<T> aFeatures)
{

    Class RuleType = cRule.getClass();


    // if the parameter passed is a subclass of AbstractRule create some objects
    if(!RuleType.getSuperclass().getName().equals("AbstractRule"))
    {
        ArrayList<RuleType<T>> aRules = new ArrayList<RuleType<T>>();
        for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {

            RuleType<T> aRule= new RuleType<T(pattern.getMatrices().size(), 2,aFeatures);
            aRule.initialise(aRule.getMaxLocalLevel());
            aRules.add(aRule);
        }
    }
  • You cannot do this. Or probably anything like it. Class objects are just like other objects -- you cannot use them in the declaration of other variables. – Louis Wasserman Sep 11 '12 at 18:42
  • Can you pass in the class object into the method as well? applyRule(a, b, MyRule.class); Would that make it work for you? – JustinKSU Sep 11 '12 at 19:03
  • Sure I can pass that but not sure if it's going to work. Thanks for the idea. – IronHide Sep 11 '12 at 20:20
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Some of this can be done by using reflection:

private <F extends AbstractRule<T>, T> void applyRyle(F cRule, ArrayList<T> aFeatures)
{
     Class<? extends F> ruleType = cRule.getClass();
     // if the parameter passed is a subclass of AbstractRule create some objects
     if(! ruleType.getSuperclass().getName().equals("AbstractRule"))
     {
         ArrayList<? extends F> aRules = new ArrayList<? extends F>();
         for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
         {
             F aRule =
                 ruleType
                     .getConstructor(int.class, int.class, ArrayList.class)
                     .newInstance(pattern.getMatrices().size(), 2, aFeatures);
             aRule.initialise(aRule.getMaxLocalLevel());
             aRules.add(aRule);
         }
     }

though it's probably not the best way to accomplish what you really want.

  • Hey ruakh thanks for the code snipped, at least it compiles, I have modified it little bit but I will probably use the fatory pattern anyway as it seems better practice and more stable as suggested by @Dunes – IronHide Sep 11 '12 at 21:19
2

Firstly, you don't need the following line, because your generic declaration guarentees that cRule will be an instance of AbstractRule.

if (!RuleType.getSuperclass().getName().equals("AbstractRule"))

The normal and better way of checking for the above at runtime would be to use instanceof

if (!cRule instanceof AbstractRule)

As for your ArrayList declarations you could just do the following:

ArrayList<F<T>> aRules = new ArrayList<F<T>>();

Note, however, that F is not the same as the actual solid class of aRule. F will be the type that the method was called with. That is, F will be wider than the class of aRule (it may include other subclasses of F that are not subclasses of the class of aRule).

However, you cannot directly create new instances of F. You instead need to have some delegate method that will do it for you. That is, you cannot write new F(). What we could do though (since we already have a concrete instance of F) is add an abstract method to AbstractRule that can create new instances of itself eg.

public interface AbstractRule<T extends AbstractRule> {
    T newRule(some parameters you need in the constructor);
}

Now we can write:

F newRule = aRule.newRule(pattern.getMatrices().size(), 2,aFeatures);
  • So basically a Factory pattern right ? and also you said that I don't need if (!RuleType.getSuperclass().getName().equals("AbstractRule")) but I am trying to test whether the parameter type is a subclass and not ( subclass or actuall class ) which instanceof is doing – IronHide Sep 11 '12 at 20:37
  • Yes, a factory pattern, that's right. With regards to your test, the problem is it only tests for a direct subclass (ie. it will miss subclasses of subclasses of AbstractRule). In addition the word abstract implies that a class should not be directly instantiated -- that is, you should never have an object whose class is AbstractRule. – Dunes Sep 11 '12 at 20:59
  • Hmmm good point, seems like the fatory pattern is the way to go then ?. And thanks for pointing the obvious that whatever was passed to the method it has to be a subclass anyway so if parameter is a instanceof it has to be subclass anyway, good point. Regarding factory pattern I did not think of subclasses of subclasses and so on. But it could be in the future. Thanks – IronHide Sep 11 '12 at 21:11

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