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I'd like to pass my form as a reference into a class, so the class object can access public methods from the form. I've tried it in a few different places, but each one has a few limitations.

Is there a way to instantiate the class from outside of the events, but still pass in the form?

namespace MyApplication
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        //If I instantiate the class here, the form seemingly doesn't exist yet 
        //and can't be passed in using "this."
        Downloader downloader = new Downloader(this);

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //If I instantiate the class here, the form can be passed in, but the
            //class object can't be seen outside of this event.
            Downloader downloader = new Downloader(this);
        }

        private void downloadButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            //If I instantiate the class here, the form can be passed in, but the
            //class object can't be seen outside of this event.
            Downloader downloader = new Downloader(this);

            downloader.dostuff();
        }
    }
}
  • You need to look at variable scope. When you declare a variable in a Method it is visible only in that Method, In this case you need a Variable visible to the entire Class which the two answers below give you. – Mark Hall Sep 12 '12 at 1:25
5

You are almost there. Change it to:

namespace MyApplication
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        private Downloader downloader;

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.downloader = new Downloader(this);
        }

        private void downloadButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
           downloader.Whatever();
        }
    }
}
  • 1
    @appski It's called a class attribute. C# introduced this "property" term that means an attribute + get; set;. The most usual place to instantiate a class attribute is at the constructor. However, since you're using it inside a Form, we can safely use the Form_Load like it was the ctor. This attribute will have the same lifetime as the object that contains it (that is, the form). – Andre Calil Sep 12 '12 at 1:30
  • 2
    @AndreCalil It's not a class attribute, actually. It's a field. Attributes are something quite different. – Brian Warshaw Sep 12 '12 at 1:31
  • 1
    @appski Yes, you are getting it. Declaration and assignment are different moments. As you have pointed at the question, we can't do them together because of the form lifetime, that's why we are breaking it into 2 steps. Due to the attribute's lifetime, you can safely use it inside methods and events, because it will exist as long as your form exists. – Andre Calil Sep 12 '12 at 1:36
  • 1
    They call them "fields" in java, and I'm quite certain I've seen them referred to as "fields" in .NET, as well. And when C# has a very different construct called an "attribute", it muddies the water to call a member variable an "attribute", even if it conforms to a book or books that you read. – Brian Warshaw Sep 12 '12 at 1:37
  • 1
    He's coding in C#, and he's clearly a beginner. He's far more likely to come across the Framework's terminology on MSDN than he is the "OO basics" that you're clinging to. For a beginner, being told that a field is called an attribute becomes very confusing when they're also told that bracketed decorators are called attributes. I'm not debating your "OO basics", because it doesn't matter. They don't make it clearer for him to work in the space he's working in. – Brian Warshaw Sep 12 '12 at 1:41
1
namespace MyApplication
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        Downloader downloader;
        // either of the following two will work
        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            downloader = new Downloader(this);
        }

        private void downloadButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            downloader = new Downloader(this);
        }
    }
}

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