5

I have a set of enum values defined in the "Foo" class (below).

namespace Fii
{
    class Foo 
    {
        struct Bar
        {
            enum Baz
            {
                BAZ1,
                BAZ2, 
                BAZ3
            };
        };
    };
};

I am using a struct to reduce the scope of Baz enum values as well as show there are a group of related values.

My objective is to assign a value from an enum type to a variable. Using the class definition above, one can do this:

Fii::Foo::Bar::Baz myValue = Fii::Foo::Bar::BAZ1 (Works in both C++98 and C++11)

However, I feel that:

  • At first glance, myValue seems to be initialized as a Fii::Foo::Bar but this is just because enum are a hack to group related constants in the parent (Bar in this case)

To improve readiness, I I re-factored the code to:

namespace Fii
{
    class Foo 
    {
        enum Baz
        {
            BAZ1,
            BAZ2, 
            BAZ3
        };
    };
};

Using this new class definition, one can do this:

Fii::Foo::Baz myValue = Fii::Foo::Baz::BAZ1 (Works in C++11 only)
Fii::Foo::Baz myValue = Fii::Foo::BAZ1 (Should work on C++98 and C++11 - not tested)

Q1) Why is Fii::Foo::Bar::Baz myValue = Fii::Foo::Baz::BAZ1 only working on C++11 ?

Q2) In C++98, is there a way to write Fii::Foo::Baz myValue = Fii::Foo::Baz::BAZ1 ? You are allowed to make any changes you like in the class definition.

Environment: - Clang compiler with C++11 support - Xcode 4 - Mac OS OS 10.8

5

juanchopanza's answer's valid for Q1...

Q2: In C++98, is there a way to write Fii::Foo::Baz myValue = Fii::Foo::Baz::BAZ1 ? You are allowed to make any changes you like in the class definition.

Something like:

namespace Fii
{
    class Foo
    {
        class Baz
        {
          public:
            enum E { BAZ1, BAZ2, BAZ3 };
            Baz(E e) : e_(e) { }
            operator const E() const { return e_; }
          private:
            E e_;
        };
    };
}

Explanation: for Fii::Foo::Baz::BAZ1 to be a valid reference to an enumeration in C++03, Baz must be a namespace or class/struct/union. But, we're trying to make it seem as if Baz itself is the enumeration type, with BAZ1 being one of the available values. To do that, we must make Baz a user-defined-type (a class/struct) capable of storing any of the enumerations declared within its scope. Therefore, we add a data member to record the current value, a constructor to set the value, an operator to expose the enumeration value implicitly so you'd don't need to code explicit references to e_ everywhere in the code using Baz objects or call some get() const function.

  • Can you please explain why this piece of code is required ? Baz(E e) : e_(e) { } operator const E() const { return e_; } private: E e_; – David Andreoletti Sep 12 '12 at 16:20
  • @DavidAndreoletti: in the code above, Baz is a "user defined type" - a class whose object instances each manage a single E value. The code you ask after is the constructor that stores one of the enumerations, an operator that implicitly provides an E value whenever the object appears in an expression where the compiler doesn't know what to do with a Baz, and the member variable storing the E. Is that clear? - feel free to ask for further clarification / examples.... – Tony Delroy Sep 13 '12 at 1:00
  • I tried your suggestion and it works just fine. Do you think this help code readability and does not hamper code maintainability ? – David Andreoletti Sep 18 '12 at 5:59
  • @DavidAndreoletti: often it's practical to use enumerations without explicitly grouping them in their own scope (i.e. to use Fii::Foo::BAZ1 rather than Fii::Foo::Baz::BAZ1), but as the number of identifiers in Fii::Foo increases there's more chance of conflicts, and therefore of having to pick less intuitive identifiers or add hardcoded prefixes or suffixes to group the enumerations. As with namespaces, you can err on either side and good judgement comes with experience & understanding factors like code volatility, coordination, and exposure and access to client code. – Tony Delroy Sep 18 '12 at 6:16
  • @DavidAndreoletti: for example, if Fii::Foo is your company namespace (not a class) it might be broken over many headers controlled by different teams with little coordination, and exposed directly to client code you don't even know exists. You don't want your new identifiers clashing with other teams, and may want to force clients to unambiguously qualify which enum's enumeration they're using. At the other extreme, if the enums are in your private implementation file and you just ship the binary, there's little chance of hard-to-fix conflict or coupling. – Tony Delroy Sep 18 '12 at 6:19
6

C++11 adds class enums. It also adds a new way of accessing old-style enum values, which is what you are seeing here.

enum Foo { FOO1, FOO2, FOO3 }; // old-style enum

Foo f1 = Foo::FOO1; // OK in C++11, error in C++98.
Foo f2 = FOO1; // OK in C++98 and C++11 (for backward compatibility)

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