11

I am trying to delay the default event or events in a jQuery script. The context is that I want to display a message to users when they perform certain actions (click primarily) for a few seconds before the default action fires.

Pseudo-code: - User clicks link/button/element - User gets a popup message stating 'You are leaving site' - Message remains on screen for X milliseconds - Default action (can be other than href link too) fires

So far, my attempts look like this:

$(document).ready(function() {
    var orgE = $("a").click();
    $("a").click(function(event) {
        var orgEvent = event;
        event.preventDefault();
        // Do stuff
        doStuff(this);

        setTimeout(function() {
            // Hide message
            hideMessage();
            $(this).trigger(orgEvent);
        }, 1000);
    });
});

Of course, this doesn't work as expected, but may show what I'm trying to do.

I am unable to use plugins as ths is a hosted environment with no online access.

Any ideas?

4 Answers 4

6

I would probably do something like this.

$("a").click(function(event) {
   event.preventDefault();
   doStuff(this);
   var url = $(this).attr("href");

   setTimeout(function() {
      hideMessage();
      window.location = url;
   }, 1000);
});

I'm not sure if url can be seen from inside the timed function. If not, you may need to declare it outside the click handler.

Edit: If you need to trigger the event from the timed function, you could use something similar to what karim79 suggested, although I'd make a few changes.

$(document).ready(function() {
  var slept = false;
  $("a").click(function(event) {
    if(!slept) {
        event.preventDefault();
        doStuff(this);

        var $element = $(this);
        // allows us to access this object from inside the function

        setTimeout(function() {
          hideMessage();
          slept = true;
          $element.click(); //triggers the click event with slept = true
        }, 1000);
        // if we triggered the click event here, it would loop through
        // this function recursively until slept was false. we don't want that.
    } else {
        slept = false; //re-initialize
    }
  });
});

Edit: After some testing and research, I'm not sure that it's actually possible to trigger the original click event of an <a> element. It appears to be possible for any element other than <a>.

1
  • The problem with this approach is that I do not know if the original action is to go to a URL. It may simply be another javascript function that has nothing to do with navigation at all. Aug 6, 2009 at 15:59
3

Something like this should do the trick. Add a new class (presumably with a more sensible name than the one I've chosen) to all the links you want to be affected. Remove that class when you've shown your popup, so when you call .click() again your code will no longer run, and the default behavior will occur.

$("a").addClass("fancy-schmancy-popup-thing-not-yet-shown").click(function() {
    if ($(this).hasClass("fancy-schmancy-popup-thing-not-yet-shown"))
        return true;

    doStuff();
    $(this).removeClass("fancy-schmancy-popup-thing-not-yet-shown");

    var link = this;
    setTimeout(function() {
      hideMessage();
      $(link).click().addClass("fancy-schmancy-popup-thing-not-yet-shown";
    }, 1000);

    return false;
});
2
  • I'm still not seeing how this will preserve the original event in any way. Am I missiong something? Aug 10, 2009 at 22:22
  • The later call to $(link).click() will behave as though the user just clicked the link in question. Your event handler for that click event will of course run again, but this time the link will no longer carry that class, so your event handler will just return true. Whenever an event handler returns true, the browser will continue performing other actions associated with the event, including the original (default) behavior (e.g., going to a new page). Aug 11, 2009 at 11:20
3

Probably the best way to do this is to use unbind. Something like:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("a").click(function(event) {
        event.preventDefault();
        // Do stuff
        this.unbind(event).click();
    });
})
1
  • 1
    You're using the DOM "this" for unbind, that code should be: if(typeof event == 'undefined') { return true; } $(this).unbind(event); this.click()
    – Jesse Adam
    Oct 2, 2015 at 18:56
-2

This might work:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $("a").click(function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    doStuff(this);

    setTimeout(function() {
      hideMessage();
      $(this).click();
    }, 1000);
  });
});

Note: totally untested

3
  • 1
    Wouldn't this fire the same click handler again, including the event.preventDefault?
    – DLH
    Aug 6, 2009 at 12:25
  • It wont work as the this context will be the window and not the anchor
    – redsquare
    Aug 6, 2009 at 12:27
  • need to take a reference to the anchor and use that inside the setTimeout. However yes it would result in a infinite loop. You would need to unbind the click event in order for it not to run.
    – redsquare
    Aug 6, 2009 at 12:28

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