103

In my place of work I see this style used extensively:-

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
   A(int& thing) : m_thing(thing) {}
   void printit() { cout << m_thing << endl; }

protected:
   const int& m_thing; //usually would be more complex object
};


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
   int myint = 5;
   A myA(myint);
   myA.printit();
   return 0;
}

Is there a name to describe this idiom? I am assuming it is to prevent the possibly large overhead of copying a big complex object?

Is this generally good practice? Are there any pitfalls to this approach?

1
  • 4
    One possible pitfall is if the object that you have a reference to in the member variable gets destroyed elsewhere and you try to access it through your class Sep 12, 2012 at 11:36

5 Answers 5

141

Is there a name to describe this idiom?

In UML it is called aggregation. It differs from composition in that the member object is not owned by the referring class. In C++ you can implement aggregation in two different ways, through references or pointers.

I am assuming it is to prevent the possibly large overhead of copying a big complex object?

No, that would be a really bad reason to use this. The main reason for aggregation is that the contained object is not owned by the containing object and thus their lifetimes are not bound. In particular the referenced object lifetime must outlive the referring one. It might have been created much earlier and might live beyond the end of the lifetime of the container. Besides that, the state of the referenced object is not controlled by the class, but can change externally. If the reference is not const, then the class can change the state of an object that lives outside of it.

Is this generally good practice? Are there any pitfalls to this approach?

It is a design tool. In some cases it will be a good idea, in some it won't. The most common pitfall is that the lifetime of the object holding the reference must never exceed the lifetime of the referenced object. If the enclosing object uses the reference after the referenced object was destroyed, you will have undefined behavior. In general it is better to prefer composition to aggregation, but if you need it, it is as good a tool as any other.

7
  • 14
    "No, that would be a really bad reason to use this". Could you please elaborate on this point ? What could be used instead to achieve that ?
    – coincoin
    Mar 29, 2016 at 13:30
  • 9
    to prevent the possibly large overhead of copying a big complex object?
    – coincoin
    Mar 31, 2016 at 13:32
  • 1
    @coincoin Such overhead should be avoided by using move semantics or RVO. Reference members have no relation to avoiding overhead at all. Oct 16, 2016 at 7:10
  • 6
    @underscore_d thanks for your answer. Then what happens when you cannot use either of them. Imagine we want to share the same object inside different classes. You end up with a copy of the object for each class if you pass this member object by value ? So the solution is to use smart pointers or references to avoid copy. No ?
    – coincoin
    Nov 14, 2016 at 13:43
  • 5
    @plats1 that's what I just wrote I know that. My point is that you can use either smart pointers or references.
    – coincoin
    Jun 26, 2017 at 8:33
47

It's called dependency injection via constructor injection: class A gets the dependency as an argument to its constructor and saves the reference to dependent class as a private variable.

There's an interesting introduction on wikipedia.

For const-correctness I'd write:

using T = int;

class A
{
public:
  A(const T &thing) : m_thing(thing) {}
  // ...

private:
   const T &m_thing;
};

but a problem with this class is that it accepts references to temporary objects:

T t;
A a1{t};    // this is ok, but...

A a2{T()};  // ... this is BAD.

It's better to add (requires C++11 at least):

class A
{
public:
  A(const T &thing) : m_thing(thing) {}
  A(const T &&) = delete;  // prevents rvalue binding
  // ...

private:
  const T &m_thing;
};

Anyway if you change the constructor:

class A
{
public:
  A(const T *thing) : m_thing(*thing) { assert(thing); }
  // ...

private:
   const T &m_thing;
};

it's pretty much guaranteed that you won't have a pointer to a temporary.

Also, since the constructor takes a pointer, it's clearer to users of A that they need to pay attention to the lifetime of the object they pass.


Somewhat related topics are:

1
  • 1
    Why there is so much strikethrough? I think the content is meaningful.
    – John
    Jun 24, 2021 at 1:31
26

Is there a name to describe this idiom?

There is no name for this usage, it is simply known as "Reference as class member".

I am assuming it is to prevent the possibly large overhead of copying a big complex object?

Yes and also scenarios where you want to associate the lifetime of one object with another object.

Is this generally good practice? Are there any pitfalls to this approach?

Depends on your usage. Using any language feature is like "choosing horses for courses". It is important to note that every (almost all) language feature exists because it is useful in some scenario.
There are a few important points to note when using references as class members:

  • You need to ensure that the referred object is guaranteed to exist till your class object exists.
  • You need to initialize the member in the constructor member initializer list. You cannot have a lazy initialization, which could be possible in case of pointer member.
  • The compiler will not generate the copy assignment operator=() and you will have to provide one yourself. It is cumbersome to determine what action your = operator shall take in such a case. So basically your class becomes non-assignable.
  • References cannot be NULL or made to refer any other object. If you need reseating, then it is not possible with a reference as in case of a pointer.

For most practical purposes (unless you are really concerned of high memory usage due to member size) just having a member instance, instead of pointer or reference member should suffice. This saves you a whole lot of worrying about other problems which reference/pointer members bring along though at expense of extra memory usage.

If you must use a pointer, make sure you use a smart pointer instead of a raw pointer. That would make your life much easier with pointers.

3
  • "I am assuming it is to prevent the possibly large overhead of copying a big complex object? Yes" - please elaborate on why you think this pattern has any relevance to avoiding copying, as i cannot see any. if this non-'idiom' somehow saves copies for anyone as a side-effect of its real purposes, then their original design was fatally flawed to begin with, and just replacing it in-place with this pattern is unlikely to do what they expect. Oct 16, 2016 at 7:11
  • 1
    @underscore_d Say a class needs a non-trivial amount of const data and there can be many instances of this class at the same time, it could be unacceptably wasteful for each instance to have it's own copy of that const data. So saving a const reference to an external location of that data that can be shared saves a lot of copying. shared_ptr is not necessarily a solution because the data handle need not necessarily be dynamically allocated. Apr 22, 2019 at 14:31
  • 1
    @Unimportant I'm not sure what my objection was back in 2016. I use references as class members all the time. Maybe I was concerned that simply replacing by-value ownership with references would lead to lifetime questions and isn't necessarily a panacaea or something that can always be done 1:1. I dunno. Apr 23, 2019 at 14:51
1

C++ provides a good mechanism to manage the life time of an object though class/struct constructs. This is one of the best features of C++ over other languages.

When you have member variables exposed through ref or pointer it violates the encapsulation in principle. This idiom enables the consumer of the class to change the state of an object of A without it(A) having any knowledge or control of it. It also enables the consumer to hold on to a ref/pointer to A's internal state, beyond the life time of the object of A. This is bad design. Instead the class could be refactored to hold a ref/pointer to the shared object (not own it) and these could be set using the constructor (Mandate the life time rules). The shared object's class may be designed to support multithreading/concurrency as the case may apply.

1
  • 5
    but the code in the OP does not hold a reference to any member variable. it has a member variable that is a reference. so, great points, but seemingly unrelated. Oct 16, 2016 at 7:15
-3

Member references are usually considered bad. They make life hard compared to member pointers. But it's not particularly unsual, nor is it some special named idiom or thing. It's just aliasing.

1

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