91

When I try to install tSQLt onto an existing database i get the following error:

The database owner SID recorded in the master database differs from the database owner SID recorded in database ''. You should correct this situation by resetting the owner of database '' using the ALTER AUTHORIZATION statement.

147

This problem can arise when a database restored from a backup and the SID of the database owner does not match the owners SID listed in the master database. Here is a solution that uses the "ALTER AUTHORIZATION" statement recommended in the error message:

DECLARE @Command VARCHAR(MAX) = 'ALTER AUTHORIZATION ON DATABASE::[<<DatabaseName>>] TO 
[<<LoginName>>]' 

SELECT @Command = REPLACE(REPLACE(@Command 
            , '<<DatabaseName>>', SD.Name)
            , '<<LoginName>>', SL.Name)
FROM master..sysdatabases SD 
JOIN master..syslogins SL ON  SD.SID = SL.SID
WHERE  SD.Name = DB_NAME()

PRINT @Command
EXEC(@Command)
4
  • 1
    Thanks! That seems more appropriate. Do you think it's not worthwhile to use quotename() instead of putting the '[' in the string? Also maybe selecting into var DBName and var LoginName then putting those together into var Command instead of using REPLACE()?
    – JDPeckham
    Nov 14 '12 at 19:19
  • 3
    If you have spaces or special characters like '-' in your DB name this script will give you error. So just put [] brackets like this: 'ALTER AUTHORIZATION ON DATABASE::[<<DatabaseName>>] TO [<<LoginName>>]'
    – buhtla
    Jan 25 '13 at 10:39
  • 11
    When I run this I get the error "The proposed new database owner is already a user or aliased in the database"
    – MobileMon
    Nov 27 '13 at 15:19
  • For this script, the inner join to syslogins does not work for me probably because the SID mismatch is the problem.
    – crokusek
    Feb 12 '15 at 1:53
31

Added this to the top of the tSQLt.class.sql script

declare @user varchar(50)
SELECT  @user = quotename(SL.Name)
  FROM  master..sysdatabases SD inner join master..syslogins SL
    on  SD.SID = SL.SID
 Where  SD.Name = DB_NAME()
exec('exec sp_changedbowner ' + @user)
1
  • This worked like a charm with tSQLt Version: 1.0.5873.27393 and appears to be a simpler solution. Using MS SQL Server 2019 Developer and SSMS 18.
    – silver
    Oct 4 '20 at 3:03
21

Apply the below script on database you get the error:

EXEC sp_changedbowner 'sa'

ALTER DATABASE [database_name] SET TRUSTWORTHY ON 
1
  • 1
    The second statement cases the following security vulnerability: VA1102 - The Trustworthy bit should be disabled on all databases except MSDB Dec 10 '19 at 7:06
5

Necromaning:
If you don't want to use the SQL-Server 2000 views (deprecated), use this:

-- Restore sid when db restored from backup... 
DECLARE @Command NVARCHAR(MAX) 
SET @Command = N'ALTER AUTHORIZATION ON DATABASE::<<DatabaseName>> TO <<LoginName>>' 
SELECT @Command = REPLACE 
                  ( 
                      REPLACE(@Command, N'<<DatabaseName>>', QUOTENAME(SD.Name)) 
                      , N'<<LoginName>>' 
                      ,
                      QUOTENAME
                      (
                          COALESCE
                          (
                               SL.name 
                              ,(SELECT TOP 1 name FROM sys.server_principals WHERE type_desc = 'SQL_LOGIN' AND is_disabled = 'false' ORDER BY principal_id ASC )
                          )
                      )
                  ) 
FROM sys.databases AS SD
LEFT JOIN sys.server_principals  AS SL 
    ON SL.SID = SD.owner_sid 


WHERE SD.Name = DB_NAME() 

PRINT @command 
EXECUTE(@command) 
GO

Also prevents bug on oddly named database or user, and also fixes bug if no user is associated (uses sa login).

5

The simplest way to change DB owner is:

EXEC SP_ChangeDBOwner 'sa'
1
  • Yes we have established that.
    – JDPeckham
    Dec 11 '19 at 14:33

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