0

I have the following string:

$str = "methodA()->methodB()->methodC"

And i want to call that "chain" on an object

$obj->$str

I am currently splitting with ()-> and calling one by one, but there must be abetter way.

How can i call it on one line? thanks!

EDIT: Some more context information:

I created a Doctrine Behaviour for symfony 1.4 to be able to make certain tables from the schema searchable with Zend Lucene.

In short, i need a way to say to the behaviour "To get the searchable field you must call methodA()->methodB()->methodC()"

EDIT2: Maybe i wasnt clear enough. $obj and $str are determined at runtime, so some of your suggestions are not applicable.

EDIT3: In case you are wondering, i am currently doing this:

  <?php
  $chain = explode("()->",$str);
  $method = array_shift($chain);
  $value = $obj->$method();
  foreach($chain as $method){
    $value = $value->$method();
  }
  • So is the value in the string being created dynamically? – Mike Brant Sep 12 '12 at 14:28
  • You could implement a helper function that would do it one by one. After that, you'd do it in one line. That's usually the way programming works. – lanzz Sep 12 '12 at 14:30
  • @JavierIEH I think that without knowing there are going to be a fixed number of methods to where you could do something like $obj->{$method[0]}()->{$method[1]}()->{$method[2]}(), and assuming you don't want to use eval(), your current approach is actually suitable. – Mike Brant Sep 12 '12 at 19:52
  • I thought PHP had a method to do this by default, i guess i'll make my own method like you pointed out – JavierIEH Sep 13 '12 at 14:55
  • Your code makes it look like you are calling the first method in the chain twice. Seems like line 3 should just be $value = $obj; – erfling Aug 13 '15 at 18:42
2

After writing my comment to the main question I thought of a possible solution, though a little verbose and manual (you would have to make as many case statements as you would reasonably expect for the number of chained methods).

function chain_execute($obj, $str) {
    $chain = explode("->",$str);
    $chain = array_map('trim', $chain);
    $chain_count = count($chain);
    switch($chain_count) {
        case 1:
            return $obj->{$chain[0]}();
            break;
        case 2:
            return $obj->{$chain[0]}()->{$chain[0]}();
            break;
        case 3:
            return $obj->{$chain[0]}()->{$chain[1]}()->{$chain[2]}();
            break;
        // etc.
        default:
            // not a value you were expecting
            throw new Exception('Invalid number of methods chained: ' . $chain_count);
            break;
    }
}

Usage would be:

$result = chain_execute($obj, "methodA->methodB->methodC");
| improve this answer | |
  • I like this. What is the difference between doing $obj->$chain[0]() and $obj->{$chain[0]}() ? – JavierIEH Sep 13 '12 at 14:53
  • @JavierIEH That is just bracket notation around the variable which I think makes it a little more readable in this case. I also want to say that at some point I tried it without brackets and was having problems, but I have been doing with brackets so long I don't know if that is still the case. – Mike Brant Sep 13 '12 at 14:56
  • Note I just now changed up the explode bit, as the previous format would have had an extra "()" in the name on the last array member. You can make the explode whatever you like. Or keep the old string format and strip the "()". – Mike Brant Sep 13 '12 at 15:03
0

I generally recommend against using eval, but...

eval("$obj->$str;");

I would re-evaluate your case, though, and probably call each function directly one-by-one as expected.

| improve this answer | |
0

Your method is already good but... try

$str = "{$obj->methodA()->methodB()->methodC()}";
| improve this answer | |
  • The $obj is determined at runtime. – JavierIEH Sep 12 '12 at 18:47
  • so what? change $obj to your current runtime object – dynamic Sep 16 '12 at 11:31
  • I guess what i dont understand is what does the "{ }" do to make the difference. ¿What does it do? Thanks – JavierIEH Sep 25 '12 at 12:06
0

That is an evil approach.

Could you provide (I'm curious) a use case?

You could use call_user_func() in succession, for which you can write a helper method which is able to parse your notation and call the chain.

| improve this answer | |
  • I created a Doctrine Behaviour for symfony 1.4 to be able to make certain tables from the schema searchable with Zend Lucene. In short, i need a way to say to the behaviour "To get the searchable field you must call methodA()->methodB()->methodC()" – JavierIEH Sep 12 '12 at 14:51
0

Does the following work?

$str = $methodA()->$methodB()->$methodC();
| improve this answer | |
-1

My answer assumes you have access to the methods (methodA, methodB and methodC), can edit them, and that each method belongs to the class which $obj is an instance of.

Update each method to return an instance of the class, this will work assuming they don't return any primitive datatype like int, bool, string or otherwise:

<?php
class Example {
    public function methodA() {
        echo "method a\n";
        return $this;
    }
    public function methodB() {
        echo "method b\n";
        return $this;
    }
    public function methodC() {
        echo "method c\n";
        return $this;
    }
}
?>

Now instantiate Example, store into $obj and call your methods in succession:

<?php
$obj = new Example();
$obj->methodA()->methodB()->methodC();
?>

Which will output:

method a
method b
method c
| improve this answer | |
  • Those methods don't belong to the same class. Instead, the method "methodB()" is called on the return of "methodA()" and so on – JavierIEH Sep 12 '12 at 19:41

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