13

I'm trying to get a data frame (just.samples.with.shoulder.values, say) contain only samples that have non-NA values. I've tried to accomplish this using the complete.cases function, but I imagine that I'm doing something wrong syntactically below:

data <- structure(list(Sample = 1:14, Head = c(1L, 0L, NA, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
0L, 0L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 0L, 1L), Shoulders = c(13L, 14L, NA, 
18L, 10L, 24L, 53L, NA, 86L, 9L, 65L, 87L, 54L, 36L), Knees = c(1L, 
1L, NA, 1L, 1L, 2L, 3L, 2L, 1L, NA, 2L, 3L, 4L, 3L), Toes = c(324L, 
5L, NA, NA, 5L, 67L, 785L, 42562L, 554L, 456L, 7L, NA, 54L, NA
)), .Names = c("Sample", "Head", "Shoulders", "Knees", "Toes"
), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -14L))

just.samples.with.shoulder.values <- data[complete.cases(data[,"Shoulders"])]
print(just.samples.with.shoulder.values)

I would also be interested to know whether some other route (using subset(), say) is a wiser idea. Thanks so much for the help!

  • 2
    If you use "[" with a single argument and no comma, it will be selecting columns rather than what you wanted which was rows. Just add a comma between the paren and the left square-bracket at the end of the line ...lders"]) , ] – 42- Sep 12 '12 at 18:04
14

You could try using is.na:

data[!is.na(data["Shoulders"]),]
   Sample Head Shoulders Knees Toes
1       1    1        13     1  324
2       2    0        14     1    5
4       4    1        18     1   NA
5       5    1        10     1    5
6       6    1        24     2   67
7       7    0        53     3  785
9       9    1        86     1  554
10     10    1         9    NA  456
11     11    1        65     2    7
12     12    1        87     3   NA
13     13    0        54     4   54
14     14    1        36     3   NA
  • Thanks! That works, too! – Atticus29 Sep 12 '12 at 19:42
13

You can try complete.cases too which will return a logical vector which allow to subset the data by Shoulders

data[complete.cases(data$Shoulders), ] 
#    Sample Head Shoulders Knees Toes
#  1      1    1        13     1  324
#  2      2    0        14     1    5
#  4      4    1        18     1   NA
#  5      5    1        10     1    5
#  6      6    1        24     2   67
#  7      7    0        53     3  785
#  9      9    1        86     1  554
# 10     10    1         9    NA  456
# 11     11    1        65     2    7
# 12     12    1        87     3   NA
# 13     13    0        54     4   54
# 14     14    1        36     3   NA
0

There is a subtle difference between using is.na and complete.cases. is.na will remove actual na values whereas the objective here is to only control for a variable not deal with missing values/na's those which could be legitimate data points

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.