5

I have a question relating to the answer on this post Javascript code to parse CSV data

I'm finding I get an extra "\r\n" on the end which I don't want to add to the array. I've tried to break out of the while loop...

The original working line is

 while (arrMatches = objPattern.exec( strData )){

but I need to break out if arrMatches = "\r\n"

while ((arrMatches[ 1 ] != "\\r\\n") && arrMatches = objPattern.exec( strData )){

but get an Invalid left-hand side in assignment error.

What is the correct syntax?

  • Can't you check on arrMatches[ 1 ] in the while loop? Something tells me that arrMatches[ 1 ] hasn't been assigned to any value while initializing arrMatches, which is done after && arrMatches = .. – dbf Sep 13 '12 at 0:25
  • @dbf - your right. It gets assigned directly after that line from arrMatches = objPattern.exec.... Ok can i do something like If (arrMatches[ 1 ] != "\\r\\n") {Exit while}? – user3357963 Sep 13 '12 at 0:28
  • Try to flip it? while (arrMatches = objPattern.exec( strData ) && (arrMatches[ 1 ] != "\\r\\n")){, I don't really know the behaviour of the while loop condition in javascript – dbf Sep 13 '12 at 0:29
  • And yes, you can eventually use an if and break; if flipping the two doesn't work – dbf Sep 13 '12 at 0:34
  • 2
    That error is because && has a higher precendence than =. (Further info.) – nnnnnn Sep 13 '12 at 1:45
4

This approach should work, the only thing is that arrMatches should be between ( ) too, to avoid arrMatches being set to true from the second condition.

while ((arrMatches = objPattern.exec( strData )) && (arrMatches[ 1 ] != "\\r\\n")) {
7

just separate the two conditions to make it more readable and understandable

while(arrMatches = objPattern.exec( strData )){

    if(arrMatches[ 1 ] == "\r\n"){
        break;
    }
    /*
     *if(arrMatches[ 1 ] == "\r\n")
     *   break;
     */
     // rest of code
}
  • 1
    Really? :) ..... – dbf Sep 13 '12 at 0:38
2

Another way: the expression block of the while operator can be easily split up into a chain of comma-separated expressions expecting the loop to break once the last expression evaluates to 0/false.

It's NOT equivalent to logical && chaining since a comma ',' operators in JS always return the last expression. (Thanks GitaarLab to remind me about that)

In these examples the loop stops once the last variable reaches 0 and thus evaluates to false.

var i = 10, j = 10;
while (i--, j--) console.log(i);
/*9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0*/

var i = 10, j = 5;
while (i--, j--) console.log(i);
/*9
8
7
6
5*/

var i = 10, j = 5, k = 3;
while (i--, j--, k--) console.log(i);
/*9
8
7*/
  • 1
    Sorry, but I must downvote (not because I've spent a day tracking down my bug that came from your answer, but) because it is currently wrong and misleading to say: the expression block of the while operator can be easily split up into a chain of expressions with the comma ",". It's equivalent to logical && chaining. It is NOT equivalent to && since only the last result is returned (so no && or ||)! Try: var i=10,j=5,k=3;while(k--,j--,i--)alert(i); (or fiddle) to see the proof. Please don't delete (but fix) your answer so other 'ninja' coders are warned!! – GitaarLAB Aug 8 '13 at 13:39
  • @GitaarLAB, they are warned, thanks ;) I'd also suggest to avoid using commas in loop expression bodies. I'm sure it's there because of the general comma-operator existence in javascript rather than from any practical meanings. This reply is to expose one additional feature of the language - but not to propagate its usage in real production code. – Arman McHitarian Sep 16 '13 at 7:05
  • so.. just to be on the clear side: in your example 'the loop does not stop once one of the variables reaches 0 and thus evaluates to false', but if the last value reaches 0!!! Try the example from my first comment: the loop should count down from 3 (variable k) and stop, but it doesn't!! It counts back from 10 (variable i). Thus you can't use the comma-operator to exit a loop based on 2 conditions (yet your answer has value in pointing out that you can't do it that way). PS: Just like ternary operators etc I sometimes like using the comma-operator in loop expressions. – GitaarLAB Sep 16 '13 at 7:31
  • @GitaarLAB, did it. better late than never :) – Arman McHitarian Jul 4 '14 at 13:13
1

You could try a while loop that handles one condition, and inside the while loop, you have an if statement that checks the other condition.

Example:

while (one condition) {
   if (other condition) {
       do something;
   }
}

Whether this is the appropriate way to do it, I'm not entirely sure. I'll update my answer if I find something better.

  • Well, for what else would have an if statement been designed for? – dbf Sep 13 '12 at 0:43
0

Try: while ((arrMatches[ 1 ] != "\r\n") && arrMatches == objPattern.exec( strData )){

With a single '=', you are actually assigning a value to arrMatches. In order to compare values you should use ==.

  • Assignment is intended, it's a shortcut that does assignment and evaluation in one step (and leads to confusion). – RobG Sep 13 '12 at 0:39

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