156

Are the two statements below equivalent?

SELECT [...]
FROM [...]
WHERE some_col in (1,2,3,4,5) AND some_other_expr

and

SELECT [...]
FROM [...]
WHERE some_col in (1,2,3) or some_col in (4,5) AND some_other_expr

Is there some sort of truth table I could use to verify this?

  • 3
    Try: T T F. (T or T) and F. T or (T and F). The reader of code should be clearly able to see the intent of the writer of code. And the writer needs to be sure that the machine is doing what he intended. Parentheses align all three: reader, writer, and machine. :) – Assad Ebrahim Nov 6 '15 at 12:20
257

And has precedence over Or, so, even if a <=> a1 Or a2

Where a And b 

is not the same as

Where a1 Or a2 And b,

because that would be Executed as

Where a1 Or (a2 And b)

and what you want, to make them the same, is the following (using parentheses to override rules of precedence):

 Where (a1 Or a2) And b

Here's an example to illustrate:

Declare @x tinyInt = 1
Declare @y tinyInt = 0
Declare @z tinyInt = 0

Select Case When @x=1 OR @y=1 And @z=1 Then 'T' Else 'F' End -- outputs T
Select Case When (@x=1 OR @y=1) And @z=1 Then 'T' Else 'F' End -- outputs F

For those who like to consult references (in alphabetic order):

  • 3
    Ouch... thank you... glad I asked this question :) Here's some further reference that says exactly the same thing: praetoriate.com/t_garmany_easysql_sql_logical_operators.htm Time to use some parentheses. – nc. Aug 7 '09 at 3:21
  • 16
    It is good practice to use parentheses even if they are not needed. very few programers (if any) know precedence of all operators available. – Trismegistos Nov 6 '13 at 11:45
  • @Trismegistos Wish it weren't so... it shouldn't be so, but I'm guessing you are right. – Charles Bretana Apr 23 '14 at 18:53
  • 1
    This AND then OR precedence is part of the SQL standard? – Jaime Hablutzel Sep 15 '14 at 8:27
  • 4
    @Bsienn, Not sure what you did, but that is inconsistent with standard SQL and with MySQL documentation... dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/operator-precedence.html You should try again, - carefully this time...try declare @x tinyInt = 1 declare @y tinyInt = 0 declare @z tinyInt = 0 select case when @x=1 or @y=1 and @z=1 then'T' else 'F' end select case when (@x=1 or @y=1) and @z=1 then'T' else 'F' end – Charles Bretana May 18 '15 at 18:27
32

I'll add 2 points:

  • "IN" is effectively serial ORs with parentheses around them
  • AND has precedence over OR in every language I know

So, the 2 expressions are simply not equal.

WHERE some_col in (1,2,3,4,5) AND some_other_expr
--to the optimiser is this
WHERE
     (
     some_col = 1 OR
     some_col = 2 OR 
     some_col = 3 OR 
     some_col = 4 OR 
     some_col = 5
     )
     AND
     some_other_expr

So, when you break the IN clause up, you split the serial ORs up, and changed precedence.

  • gbn Is there associativity in ORACLE SQL? IF YES then how and where I can get all operators associativity? – Asif Mushtaq Dec 25 '15 at 6:49
  • 2
    As much as it pains me to say it, AND does not have precedence over OR in ruby! To make things worse, && does have precedence over ||! One of the reasons I don't like ruby--it violates the principle of least astonishment over and over for me. 2.2.1 :007 > true or true and false => false 2.2.1 :008 > true || true && false => true – Alex L Mar 1 '17 at 0:01
21
  1. Arithmetic operators
  2. Concatenation operator
  3. Comparison conditions
  4. IS [NOT] NULL, LIKE, [NOT] IN
  5. [NOT] BETWEEN
  6. Not equal to
  7. NOT logical condition
  8. AND logical condition
  9. OR logical condition

You can use parentheses to override rules of precedence.

8

Query to show a 3-variable boolean expression truth table :

;WITH cteData AS
(SELECT 0 AS A, 0 AS B, 0 AS C
UNION ALL SELECT 0,0,1
UNION ALL SELECT 0,1,0
UNION ALL SELECT 0,1,1
UNION ALL SELECT 1,0,0
UNION ALL SELECT 1,0,1
UNION ALL SELECT 1,1,0
UNION ALL SELECT 1,1,1
)
SELECT cteData.*,
    CASE WHEN

(A=1) OR (B=1) AND (C=1)

    THEN 'True' ELSE 'False' END AS Result
FROM cteData

Results for (A=1) OR (B=1) AND (C=1) :

A   B   C   Result
0   0   0   False
0   0   1   False
0   1   0   False
0   1   1   True
1   0   0   True
1   0   1   True
1   1   0   True
1   1   1   True

Results for (A=1) OR ( (B=1) AND (C=1) ) are the same.

Results for ( (A=1) OR (B=1) ) AND (C=1) :

A   B   C   Result
0   0   0   False
0   0   1   False
0   1   0   False
0   1   1   True
1   0   0   False
1   0   1   True
1   1   0   False
1   1   1   True

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