84

Are there any classes/functions available to be used for easy JSON escaping? I'd rather not have to write my own.

  • 1
    JsonConvert.ToString() worked for me. – Martin Lottering Mar 30 '17 at 19:57

12 Answers 12

57

I use System.Web.HttpUtility.JavaScriptStringEncode

string quoted = HttpUtility.JavaScriptStringEncode(input);
  • 5
    I used this to avoid the missing System.Web.Helpers.Json.Encode in VS2015, but it needs the (input, true) parameter to include the actual quotes as well. – lapo Jun 22 '16 at 14:37
38

Building on the answer by Dejan, what you can do is import System.Web.Helpers .NET Framework assembly, then use the following function:

static string EscapeForJson(string s) {
  string quoted = System.Web.Helpers.Json.Encode(s);
  return quoted.Substring(1, quoted.Length - 2);
}

The Substring call is required, since Encode automatically surrounds strings with double quotes.

  • Looks like System.Web.Helpers is not available before .Net 4.0 – SerG Jun 9 '15 at 14:08
  • …and no more in Visual Studio 2015 too. – lapo Jun 22 '16 at 13:45
  • 5
    This is part of ASP.NET Web Pages 2.0. It can be added using NuGet. It is not part of the framework. – Murven Dec 24 '16 at 17:37
37

For those using the very popular Json.Net project from Newtonsoft the task is trivial:

using Newtonsoft.Json;

....
var s = JsonConvert.ToString(@"a\b");
Console.WriteLine(s);
....

This code prints:

"a\\b"

That is, the resulting string value contains the quotes as well as the escaped backslash.

  • 2
    I cannot reproduce this method for deserializing an encoded and escaped unc path. My path "WatchedPath": "\\\\myserver\\output" becomes "\"\\\\\\\\myserver\\\\output\"" which is pretty unacceptable. – slestak Dec 29 '14 at 14:36
  • 3
    The method above is not for deserializing - rater it is used when you want to create a JSON text manually and you have a C# string and need to gets its proper representation as a text. – Dror Harari Dec 30 '14 at 22:50
  • @slestak, I think I am facing the same issue you were here. Did you find a solution? – GP24 Feb 11 '16 at 11:50
  • @GP24 IIRC, I did not. Sorry I do not have any more info. – slestak Feb 11 '16 at 15:15
  • No problem, thanks for replying. I did this if it helps you: yourAnnoyingDoubleEncodedString.Replace("\\\\", "\\").Replace("\\\"", "\""); – GP24 Feb 11 '16 at 15:24
24

Yep, just add the following function to your Utils class or something:

    public static string cleanForJSON(string s)
    {
        if (s == null || s.Length == 0) {
            return "";
        }

        char         c = '\0';
        int          i;
        int          len = s.Length;
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(len + 4);
        String       t;

        for (i = 0; i < len; i += 1) {
            c = s[i];
            switch (c) {
                case '\\':
                case '"':
                    sb.Append('\\');
                    sb.Append(c);
                    break;
                case '/':
                    sb.Append('\\');
                    sb.Append(c);
                    break;
                case '\b':
                    sb.Append("\\b");
                    break;
                case '\t':
                    sb.Append("\\t");
                    break;
                case '\n':
                    sb.Append("\\n");
                    break;
                case '\f':
                    sb.Append("\\f");
                    break;
                case '\r':
                    sb.Append("\\r");
                    break;
                default:
                    if (c < ' ') {
                        t = "000" + String.Format("X", c);
                        sb.Append("\\u" + t.Substring(t.Length - 4));
                    } else {
                        sb.Append(c);
                    }
                    break;
            }
        }
        return sb.ToString();
    }
  • 3
    Why do you need to escape /? – drzaus Apr 21 '16 at 15:11
  • I know this is an old answer and I'm happy to see this was given as I didn't want to rely on any external libraries, but I noticed that the default case for a control character will always return "\\u000X". I believe you need to cast the char first to an int. Consider replacing it with string t = "000" + ((int)c).ToString("X"); – Jan Discart Dec 22 '18 at 19:18
18

I have used following code to escape the string value for json. You need to add your '"' to the output of the following code:

public static string EscapeStringValue(string value)
{
    const char BACK_SLASH = '\\';
    const char SLASH = '/';
    const char DBL_QUOTE = '"';

    var output = new StringBuilder(value.Length);
    foreach (char c in value)
    {
        switch (c)
        {
            case SLASH:
                output.AppendFormat("{0}{1}", BACK_SLASH, SLASH);
                break;

            case BACK_SLASH:
                output.AppendFormat("{0}{0}", BACK_SLASH);
                break;

            case DBL_QUOTE:
                output.AppendFormat("{0}{1}",BACK_SLASH,DBL_QUOTE);
                break;

            default:
                output.Append(c);
                break;
        }
    }

    return output.ToString();
}
  • 1
    This really saved my day. Thanks a lot! – casaout Oct 31 '13 at 14:44
  • 5
    Do not use this code in production! This JSON escaping misses important special characters. See: stackoverflow.com/a/33799784 – vog Nov 19 '15 at 11:49
  • 2
    This code does not cover all the special cases. DO NOT use in production. – Envil Sep 8 '16 at 4:49
  • 1
    reinvent the wheel, and introduce some bug in special cases, is not a good answer – Xilmiki Oct 19 '16 at 9:47
4

I would also recommend using the JSON.NET library mentioned, but if you have to escape unicode characters (e.g. \uXXXX format) in the resulting JSON string, you may have to do it yourself. Take a look at Converting Unicode strings to escaped ascii string for an example.

4

I ran speed tests on some of these answers for a long string and a short string. Clive Paterson's code won by a good bit, presumably because the others are taking into account serialization options. Here are my results:

Apple Banana
System.Web.HttpUtility.JavaScriptStringEncode: 140ms
System.Web.Helpers.Json.Encode: 326ms
Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.ToString: 230ms
Clive Paterson: 108ms

\\some\long\path\with\lots\of\things\to\escape\some\long\path\t\with\lots\of\n\things\to\escape\some\long\path\with\lots\of\"things\to\escape\some\long\path\with\lots"\of\things\to\escape
System.Web.HttpUtility.JavaScriptStringEncode: 2849ms
System.Web.Helpers.Json.Encode: 3300ms
Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.ToString: 2827ms
Clive Paterson: 1173ms

And here is the test code:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var testStr1 = "Apple Banana";
    var testStr2 = @"\\some\long\path\with\lots\of\things\to\escape\some\long\path\t\with\lots\of\n\things\to\escape\some\long\path\with\lots\of\""things\to\escape\some\long\path\with\lots""\of\things\to\escape";

    foreach (var testStr in new[] { testStr1, testStr2 })
    {
        var results = new Dictionary<string,List<long>>();

        for (var n = 0; n < 10; n++)
        {
            var count = 1000 * 1000;

            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                var s = System.Web.HttpUtility.JavaScriptStringEncode(testStr);
            }
            var t = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            results.GetOrCreate("System.Web.HttpUtility.JavaScriptStringEncode").Add(t);

            sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                var s = System.Web.Helpers.Json.Encode(testStr);
            }
            t = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            results.GetOrCreate("System.Web.Helpers.Json.Encode").Add(t);

            sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                var s = Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.ToString(testStr);
            }
            t = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            results.GetOrCreate("Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.ToString").Add(t);

            sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (var i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                var s = cleanForJSON(testStr);
            }
            t = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            results.GetOrCreate("Clive Paterson").Add(t);
        }

        Console.WriteLine(testStr);
        foreach (var result in results)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(result.Key + ": " + Math.Round(result.Value.Skip(1).Average()) + "ms");
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
    }

    Console.ReadLine();
}
4

The methods offered here are faulty.
Why venture that far when you could just use System.Web.HttpUtility.JavaScriptEncode ?

If you're on a lower framework, you can just copy past it from mono

Courtesy of the mono-project @ https://github.com/mono/mono/blob/master/mcs/class/System.Web/System.Web/HttpUtility.cs

    public static string JavaScriptStringEncode(string value, bool addDoubleQuotes)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
            return addDoubleQuotes ? "\"\"" : string.Empty;

        int len = value.Length;
        bool needEncode = false;
        char c;
        for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
        {
            c = value[i];

            if (c >= 0 && c <= 31 || c == 34 || c == 39 || c == 60 || c == 62 || c == 92)
            {
                needEncode = true;
                break;
            }
        }

        if (!needEncode)
            return addDoubleQuotes ? "\"" + value + "\"" : value;

        var sb = new System.Text.StringBuilder();
        if (addDoubleQuotes)
            sb.Append('"');

        for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
        {
            c = value[i];
            if (c >= 0 && c <= 7 || c == 11 || c >= 14 && c <= 31 || c == 39 || c == 60 || c == 62)
                sb.AppendFormat("\\u{0:x4}", (int)c);
            else switch ((int)c)
                {
                    case 8:
                        sb.Append("\\b");
                        break;

                    case 9:
                        sb.Append("\\t");
                        break;

                    case 10:
                        sb.Append("\\n");
                        break;

                    case 12:
                        sb.Append("\\f");
                        break;

                    case 13:
                        sb.Append("\\r");
                        break;

                    case 34:
                        sb.Append("\\\"");
                        break;

                    case 92:
                        sb.Append("\\\\");
                        break;

                    default:
                        sb.Append(c);
                        break;
                }
        }

        if (addDoubleQuotes)
            sb.Append('"');

        return sb.ToString();
    }

This can be compacted into

// https://github.com/mono/mono/blob/master/mcs/class/System.Json/System.Json/JsonValue.cs
public class SimpleJSON
{

    private static  bool NeedEscape(string src, int i)
    {
        char c = src[i];
        return c < 32 || c == '"' || c == '\\'
            // Broken lead surrogate
            || (c >= '\uD800' && c <= '\uDBFF' &&
                (i == src.Length - 1 || src[i + 1] < '\uDC00' || src[i + 1] > '\uDFFF'))
            // Broken tail surrogate
            || (c >= '\uDC00' && c <= '\uDFFF' &&
                (i == 0 || src[i - 1] < '\uD800' || src[i - 1] > '\uDBFF'))
            // To produce valid JavaScript
            || c == '\u2028' || c == '\u2029'
            // Escape "</" for <script> tags
            || (c == '/' && i > 0 && src[i - 1] == '<');
    }



    public static string EscapeString(string src)
    {
        System.Text.StringBuilder sb = new System.Text.StringBuilder();

        int start = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < src.Length; i++)
            if (NeedEscape(src, i))
            {
                sb.Append(src, start, i - start);
                switch (src[i])
                {
                    case '\b': sb.Append("\\b"); break;
                    case '\f': sb.Append("\\f"); break;
                    case '\n': sb.Append("\\n"); break;
                    case '\r': sb.Append("\\r"); break;
                    case '\t': sb.Append("\\t"); break;
                    case '\"': sb.Append("\\\""); break;
                    case '\\': sb.Append("\\\\"); break;
                    case '/': sb.Append("\\/"); break;
                    default:
                        sb.Append("\\u");
                        sb.Append(((int)src[i]).ToString("x04"));
                        break;
                }
                start = i + 1;
            }
        sb.Append(src, start, src.Length - start);
        return sb.ToString();
    }
}
3

What about System.Web.Helpers.Json.Encode(...) (see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.web.helpers.json.encode(v=vs.111).aspx)?

2
String.Format("X", c);

That just outputs: X

Try this instead:

string t = ((int)c).ToString("X");

sb.Append("\\u" + t.PadLeft(4, '0'));
2

I nice one-liner, used JsonConvert as others have but added substring to remove the added quotes and backslash.

 var escapedJsonString = JsonConvert.ToString(JsonString).Substring(1, JsonString.Length - 2);
0

There's a Json library at Codeplex

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.