25

Possible Duplicate:
Implied string comparison, 0='', but 1='1'

Executing the following case in javascript, I get 0 equal to '' (an empty string)

var a   =   0;
var b   =   '';//empty string
if(a==b){
    console.log('equal');//this is printed in console
}else{
    console.log('not equal');
}

Could anyone guide that what is the reason behind this?

2
  • (typeof a == typeof b && a == b) to check if they are identical (a === b) to check if they are the same if a and b points to the same object in memory
    – DevWL
    Mar 19 '16 at 23:43
  • use code if(a===b) return correct result May 12 '17 at 9:54
48

Quoting the doc (MDN):

Equal (==)

If the two operands are not of the same type, JavaScript converts the operands then applies strict comparison. If either operand is a number or a boolean, the operands are converted to numbers if possible; else if either operand is a string, the other operand is converted to a string if possible.

As a operand type here is Number, b gets converted to Number as well. And Number('') evaluates to 0.

This can be quite surprising sometimes. Consider this, for example:

console.log(0 == '0');  // true
console.log(0 == '');   // true
console.log('' == '0'); // O'RLY?

... or this:

console.log(false == undefined); // false
console.log(false == null);      // false
console.log(null == undefined);  // fal.... NO WAIT!

...and that's exactly why it's almost always recommended to use === (strict equality) operator instead.

4
  • Thanks for the details shared. type comparison definitely should be the preferred choice. But in our case, we had a challenge that this comparison was taking place in a function receiving values as arguments and user could pass 1 as '1' too which is permissible in javscript. In such a case, if we use type comparison then '1' would not be equal to 1. Due to this, we had to avoid type comparison. Don't know what can be the safest method for this?
    – netemp
    Sep 14 '12 at 10:16
  • 1
    @netemp I'd suggest using parseInt(arg, 10) construct. When arg is a string, it will be parsed into number (and it's more consistent then Number(arg)), and when arg is a number, it'll get back to you unharmed. )
    – raina77ow
    Sep 14 '12 at 10:20
  • Great! Thanks for sharing. Will try this out.
    – netemp
    Sep 14 '12 at 10:24
  • Thankyou. Wasn't aware the type conversion was achieved using Number (which unlike parseInt does not return NaN in the case of '' or ' '). Answer also helped explain this for me, why: '' == 0 && ' ' == 0 // true. Yet: !!' ' == !!0 // false. With the latter the type conversion is done to each argument first (rather than the arguments either side of ==) therefore ' ' evaluates to truthy. Mar 3 '17 at 14:02
6

0, "" (Empty String), false all technically have the same value, when typecasted. If you need to strictly treat them, you can use ===.

It is the same with similar programming languages, like PHP.

var a = 0;
var b = ''; //empty string
if(a == b){
    console.log('equal'); //this is printed in console
}else{
    console.log('not equal');
}

To make a strict comparison:

if(a === b){
    console.log('equal');
}else{
    console.log('not equal'); //this is printed in console
}
9
  • "It is the same with any programming language." Not true. BTW, I am not downvoter.
    – Leri
    Sep 14 '12 at 9:56
  • 1
    0 null "" are all same is a funny statement. And so is It is the same with any programming language. That said, I'd say your answer is correct, but inaccurate. Sep 14 '12 at 9:56
  • 1
    Well, I have updated the answer. Sep 14 '12 at 9:58
  • Also the implication that 0==null & ''==null is not correct
    – Alex K.
    Sep 14 '12 at 9:59
  • 1
    I (the downvoter if I didn't make it clear last time) removed the downvote. Though, you should be more specific about what you typecast it to and I think saying that something is similar to PHP may be offending :) Sep 14 '12 at 10:19
2

== operator in javascript don't compare types so 0=='' === true (because as a number string '' evaluates to 0) or 0==false === true (because bool false evaluates to 0) to compare types to you can use === operator.

Here you'll find useful information about comparison.

1

Javascript automatically converts variables of different types for comparison. That's a common feature in non-strictly typed languages.

If you need to compare variables and check the type, use the === operator.

1

In most programming language(including javascript) ""(string), 0(integer), \x0(null) losely mean the same thing: "empty". What's happening is your javascript engine finds "" == 0 false, due to the == it converts 0 to an integer. Again this is false, so it converts 0 to null which is false, so then it converts 0 to an empty string. (Not sure if this is the correct order of conversion). To make the condition "exact" match(no conversion) use === inplace of ==

1

== does typecasting. Always use ===.

In your example, the empty string of b is being converted to 0. So both a and b are the same.

1

Because empty string represented as number is zero. If you compare apples and oranges you should think of how your particular orange would look if it were an apple.

1

Because of coercion. It is usually a better idea to use === for comparisons in JavaScript.

1

Because == checks value equality so false, 0 and empty strings are equals. Use identity check ===.

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