146

I have a data.frame in which certain variables contain a text string. I wish to count the number of occurrences of a given character in each individual string.

Example:

q.data<-data.frame(number=1:3, string=c("greatgreat", "magic", "not"))

I wish to create a new column for q.data with the number of occurence of "a" in string (ie. c(2,1,0)).

The only convoluted approach I have managed is:

string.counter<-function(strings, pattern){  
  counts<-NULL
  for(i in 1:length(strings)){
    counts[i]<-length(attr(gregexpr(pattern,strings[i])[[1]], "match.length")[attr(gregexpr(pattern,strings[i])[[1]], "match.length")>0])
  }
return(counts)
}

string.counter(strings=q.data$string, pattern="a")

 number     string number.of.a
1      1 greatgreat           2
2      2      magic           1
3      3        not           0

14 Answers 14

185

The stringr package provides the str_count function which seems to do what you're interested in

# Load your example data
q.data<-data.frame(number=1:3, string=c("greatgreat", "magic", "not"), stringsAsFactors = F)
library(stringr)

# Count the number of 'a's in each element of string
q.data$number.of.a <- str_count(q.data$string, "a")
q.data
#  number     string number.of.a
#1      1 greatgreat           2
#2      2      magic           1
#3      3        not           0
6
  • 1
    Yours was much faster although it does need an as.character() around the main argument to succeed with the problem posed.
    – IRTFM
    Sep 14, 2012 at 20:09
  • 1
    @DWin - That's true but I avoided that issue by adding stringsAsFactors = FALSE when defining the data frame.
    – Dason
    Sep 14, 2012 at 20:10
  • Sorry I was unclear. I was actually responding to tim riffe and telling him that his function threw an error with the problem posed. He may have used your redefinition of the problem but he didn't say so.
    – IRTFM
    Sep 14, 2012 at 20:14
  • yeah, I also did, stringsAsFactors=TRUE on my comp, but didn't mention this
    – tim riffe
    Sep 14, 2012 at 20:31
  • Searching for a string in a factor will work i.e. str_count(d$factor_column,'A') but not vice-versa
    – Nitro
    Sep 27, 2017 at 19:24
82

If you don't want to leave base R, here's a fairly succinct and expressive possibility:

x <- q.data$string
lengths(regmatches(x, gregexpr("a", x)))
# [1] 2 1 0
6
  • 3
    OK -- maybe that will only feel expressive once you've used the regmatches and gregexpr together a few times, but that combo is powerful enough that I thought it deserved a plug. Sep 14, 2012 at 15:48
  • I don't think you need the regmatches bit. The function gregexpr returns a list with the indices of the matched occurrences for each element of x.
    – savagent
    Aug 26, 2014 at 3:27
  • @savagent -- Would you mind sharing the code you'd use to compute the number of matches in each string? Aug 26, 2014 at 4:07
  • 1
    Sorry, I forgot about the -1. It only works if each line has at least one match, sapply(gregexpr("g", q.data$string), length).
    – savagent
    Aug 26, 2014 at 4:42
  • @savagent -- Yup. That was pretty much my thought process as well ;) Aug 26, 2014 at 5:17
22
nchar(as.character(q.data$string)) -nchar( gsub("a", "", q.data$string))
[1] 2 1 0

Notice that I coerce the factor variable to character, before passing to nchar. The regex functions appear to do that internally.

Here's benchmark results (with a scaled up size of the test to 3000 rows)

 q.data<-q.data[rep(1:NROW(q.data), 1000),]
 str(q.data)
'data.frame':   3000 obs. of  3 variables:
 $ number     : int  1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 ...
 $ string     : Factor w/ 3 levels "greatgreat","magic",..: 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 ...
 $ number.of.a: int  2 1 0 2 1 0 2 1 0 2 ...

 benchmark( Dason = { q.data$number.of.a <- str_count(as.character(q.data$string), "a") },
 Tim = {resT <- sapply(as.character(q.data$string), function(x, letter = "a"){
                            sum(unlist(strsplit(x, split = "")) == letter) }) }, 

 DWin = {resW <- nchar(as.character(q.data$string)) -nchar( gsub("a", "", q.data$string))},
 Josh = {x <- sapply(regmatches(q.data$string, gregexpr("g",q.data$string )), length)}, replications=100)
#-----------------------
   test replications elapsed  relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
1 Dason          100   4.173  9.959427     2.985    1.204          0         0
3  DWin          100   0.419  1.000000     0.417    0.003          0         0
4  Josh          100  18.635 44.474940    17.883    0.827          0         0
2   Tim          100   3.705  8.842482     3.646    0.072          0         0
1
  • 4
    This is the fastest solution in the answers but is made ~30% faster on your benchmark by passing the optional fixed=TRUE to gsub. There are also cases where fixed=TRUE would be required (i.e., when the character you want to count could be interpreted as a regex assertion such as .).
    – C8H10N4O2
    Jan 16, 2018 at 16:15
13

Another good option, using charToRaw:

sum(charToRaw("abc.d.aa") == charToRaw('.'))
12

The stringi package provides the functions stri_count and stri_count_fixed which are very fast.

stringi::stri_count(q.data$string, fixed = "a")
# [1] 2 1 0

benchmark

Compared to the fastest approach from @42-'s answer and to the equivalent function from the stringr package for a vector with 30.000 elements.

library(microbenchmark)

benchmark <- microbenchmark(
  stringi = stringi::stri_count(test.data$string, fixed = "a"),
  baseR = nchar(test.data$string) - nchar(gsub("a", "", test.data$string, fixed = TRUE)),
  stringr = str_count(test.data$string, "a")
)

autoplot(benchmark)

data

q.data <- data.frame(number=1:3, string=c("greatgreat", "magic", "not"), stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
test.data <- q.data[rep(1:NROW(q.data), 10000),]

enter image description here

8

A variation of https://stackoverflow.com/a/12430764/589165 is

> nchar(gsub("[^a]", "", q.data$string))
[1] 2 1 0
2

I'm sure someone can do better, but this works:

sapply(as.character(q.data$string), function(x, letter = "a"){
  sum(unlist(strsplit(x, split = "")) == letter)
})
greatgreat      magic        not 
     2          1          0 

or in a function:

countLetter <- function(charvec, letter){
  sapply(charvec, function(x, letter){
    sum(unlist(strsplit(x, split = "")) == letter)
  }, letter = letter)
}
countLetter(as.character(q.data$string),"a")
1
  • I seem to get an error with the first one ... and the second one... (was trying to benchmark all of these.)
    – IRTFM
    Sep 14, 2012 at 20:04
1

You could just use string division

require(roperators)
my_strings <- c('apple', banana', 'pear', 'melon')
my_strings %s/% 'a'

Which will give you 1, 3, 1, 0. You can also use string division with regular expressions and whole words.

0

The question below has been moved here, but it seems this page doesn't directly answer to Farah El's question. How to find number 1s in 101 in R

So, I'll write an answer here, just in case.

library(magrittr)
n %>% # n is a number you'd like to inspect
  as.character() %>%
  str_count(pattern = "1")

https://stackoverflow.com/users/8931457/farah-el

0

Yet another base R option could be:

lengths(lapply(q.data$string, grepRaw, pattern = "a", all = TRUE, fixed = TRUE))

[1] 2 1 0
0

The next expression does the job and also works for symbols, not only letters.

The expression works as follows:

1: it uses lapply on the columns of the dataframe q.data to iterate over the rows of the column 2 ("lapply(q.data[,2],"),

2: it apply to each row of the column 2 a function "function(x){sum('a' == strsplit(as.character(x), '')[[1]])}". The function takes each row value of column 2 (x), convert to character (in case it is a factor for example), and it does the split of the string on every character ("strsplit(as.character(x), '')"). As a result we have a a vector with each character of the string value for each row of the column 2.

3: Each vector value of the vector is compared with the desired character to be counted, in this case "a" (" 'a' == "). This operation will return a vector of True and False values "c(True,False,True,....)", being True when the value in the vector matches the desired character to be counted.

4: The total times the character 'a' appears in the row is calculated as the sum of all the 'True' values in the vector "sum(....)".

5: Then it is applied the "unlist" function to unpack the result of the "lapply" function and assign it to a new column in the dataframe ("q.data$number.of.a<-unlist(....")

q.data$number.of.a<-unlist(lapply(q.data[,2],function(x){sum('a' == strsplit(as.character(x), '')[[1]])}))

>q.data

#  number     string     number.of.a
#1   greatgreat         2
#2      magic           1
#3      not             0
2
  • 1
    Your answer would be a lot better with an exaplanation of what it does, especially for new users as it's not exactly a simple expression.
    – Khaine775
    Apr 7, 2020 at 7:09
  • Thanks @Khaine775 for your comment and my apologies for the lack of description of the post. I have edited the post and added some comments for better description of how it works.
    – bacnqn
    Apr 7, 2020 at 15:46
0

Another base R answer, not so good as those by @IRTFM and @Finn (or as those using stringi/stringr), but better than the others:

sapply(strsplit(q.data$string, split=""), function(x) sum(x %in% "a"))

q.data<-data.frame(number=1:3, string=c("greatgreat", "magic", "not"))
q.data<-q.data[rep(1:NROW(q.data), 3000),]
library(rbenchmark)
library(stringr)
library(stringi)

benchmark( Dason = {str_count(q.data$string, "a") },
           Tim = {sapply(q.data$string, function(x, letter = "a"){sum(unlist(strsplit(x, split = "")) == letter) }) },
           DWin = {nchar(q.data$string) -nchar( gsub("a", "", q.data$string, fixed=TRUE))}, 
           Markus = {stringi::stri_count(q.data$string, fixed = "a")},
           Finn={nchar(gsub("[^a]", "", q.data$string))},
           tmmfmnk={lengths(lapply(q.data$string, grepRaw, pattern = "a", all = TRUE, fixed = TRUE))},
           Josh1 = {sapply(regmatches(q.data$string, gregexpr("g",q.data$string )), length)}, 
           Josh2 = {lengths(regmatches(q.data$string, gregexpr("g",q.data$string )))}, 
           Iago = {sapply(strsplit(q.data$string, split=""), function(x) sum(x %in% "a"))}, 
           replications =100, order = "elapsed")

     test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
4  Markus          100   0.076    1.000     0.076    0.000          0         0
3    DWin          100   0.277    3.645     0.277    0.000          0         0
1   Dason          100   0.290    3.816     0.291    0.000          0         0
5    Finn          100   1.057   13.908     1.057    0.000          0         0
9    Iago          100   3.214   42.289     3.215    0.000          0         0
2     Tim          100   6.000   78.947     6.002    0.000          0         0
6 tmmfmnk          100   6.345   83.487     5.760    0.003          0         0
8   Josh2          100  12.542  165.026    12.545    0.000          0         0
7   Josh1          100  13.288  174.842    13.268    0.028          0         0
-1

The easiest and the cleanest way IMHO is :

q.data$number.of.a <- lengths(gregexpr('a', q.data$string))

#  number     string number.of.a`
#1      1 greatgreat           2`
#2      2      magic           1`
#3      3        not           0`
2
  • 2
    How is that done? For me, lengths(gregexpr('a', q.data$string)) returns 2 1 1, not 2 1 0. Aug 9, 2019 at 18:06
  • Unfortunately we need some post-processing of gregexpr for elements which don't contain the target character May 5, 2022 at 21:51
-2
s <- "aababacababaaathhhhhslsls jsjsjjsaa ghhaalll"
p <- "a"
s2 <- gsub(p,"",s)
numOcc <- nchar(s) - nchar(s2)

May not be the efficient one but solve my purpose.

0

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