44

I have looked in the standard library and on StackOverflow, and have not found a similar question. So, is there a way to do the following without rolling my own function? Bonus points if someone writes a beautiful function if there is no built in way.

def stringPercentToFloat(stringPercent)
    # ???
    return floatPercent

p1 = "99%"
p2 = "99.5%"
print stringPercentToFloat(p1)
print stringPercentToFloat(p2)

>>>> 0.99
>>>> 0.995
4
  • Whence arises the issue? Sep 14, 2012 at 22:18
  • I have a log with percent CPU usage, and percent memory usage, so it would be helpful to have this function so I can do sorting on the log entries.
    – Wulfram
    Sep 14, 2012 at 22:21
  • "...without rolling my own function? Bonus points if someone writes a beautiful function." Are those conflicting requirements?
    – hiwaylon
    Sep 14, 2012 at 22:30
  • Yeah, that is a conflicting requirement. I have changed it to make it a little more clear. Thanks.
    – Wulfram
    Sep 14, 2012 at 22:35

6 Answers 6

85

Use strip('%') , as:

In [9]: "99.5%".strip('%')
Out[9]: '99.5'               #convert this to float using float() and divide by 100


In [10]: def p2f(x):
    return float(x.strip('%'))/100
   ....: 

In [12]: p2f("99%")
Out[12]: 0.98999999999999999

In [13]: p2f("99.5%")
Out[13]: 0.995
2
  • The accepted answer does not take locales into account. Most of the time the decimal point is a period (.), but in other countries it may be a comma (,), so the conversion will fail.
    – krema
    Jun 16, 2020 at 18:59
  • 2
    @krema Well, it's out of scope for this question. It makes no sense to mention locale.atof every time float is being used for conversion. Jun 17, 2020 at 4:47
19
float(stringPercent.strip('%')) / 100.0
10

Simply replace the % by e-2 before parsing to float :

float("99.5%".replace('%', 'e-2'))

It's safer since the result will still be correct if there's no % used.

1
  • 3
    very elegant solution, nice
    – AFoeee
    Dec 29, 2021 at 18:22
4

I wrote the following method that should always return the output to the exact same accuracy as the input, with no floating point errors such as in the other answers.

def percent_to_float(s):
    s = str(float(s.rstrip("%")))
    i = s.find(".")
    if i == -1:
        return int(s) / 100
    if s.startswith("-"):
        return -percent_to_float(s.lstrip("-"))
    s = s.replace(".", "")
    i -= 2
    if i < 0:
        return float("." + "0" * abs(i) + s)
    else:
        return float(s[:i] + "." + s[i:])

Explanation

  1. Strip the "%" from the end.
  2. If percent has no ".", simply return it divided by 100.
  3. If percent is negative, strip the "-" and re-call function, then convert the result back to a negative and return it.
  4. Remove the decimal place.
  5. Decrement i (the index the decimal place was at) by 2, because we want to shift the decimal place 2 spaces to the left.
  6. If i is negative, then we need to pad with zeros.
    • Example: Suppose the input is "1.33%". To be able to shift the decimal place 2 spaces to the left, we would need to pad with a zero.
  7. Convert to a float.

Test case (Try it online):

from unittest.case import TestCase

class ParsePercentCase(TestCase):
    tests = {
        "150%"              : 1.5,
        "100%"              : 1,
        "99%"               : 0.99,
        "99.999%"           : 0.99999,
        "99.5%"             : 0.995,
        "95%"               : 0.95,
        "90%"               : 0.9,
        "50%"               : 0.5,
        "66.666%"           : 0.66666,
        "42%"               : 0.42,
        "20.5%"             : 0.205,
        "20%"               : 0.2,
        "10%"               : 0.1,
        "3.141592653589793%": 0.03141592653589793,
        "1%"                : 0.01,
        "0.1%"              : 0.001,
        "0.01%"             : 0.0001,
        "0%"                : 0,
    }
    tests = sorted(tests.items(), key=lambda x: -x[1])

    def test_parse_percent(self):
        for percent_str, expected in self.tests:
            parsed = percent_to_float(percent_str)
            self.assertEqual(expected, parsed, percent_str)

    def test_parse_percent_negative(self):
        negative_tests = [("-" + s, -f) for s, f in self.tests]
        for percent_str, expected in negative_tests:
            parsed = percent_to_float(percent_str)
            self.assertEqual(expected, parsed, percent_str)
8
  • 1
    You went to a lot of work for nothing, there are no floating point errors in the other answers that yours doesn't have too. See stackoverflow.com/questions/588004/… Mar 7, 2018 at 4:54
  • Well for instance in Ashwini's answer you can see that his one-liner method called like p2f("99%") returns 0.98999999999999999, whereas if you try running the test case in my answer you would see that the same input string of "99%" will give you the expected output of 0.99. Could you give an example of an input string to my method that would cause a floating point error?
    – Hat
    Mar 7, 2018 at 8:19
  • Read the link I gave you. It's a matter of how it's printed, not the actual value. With Ashwini's answer I get 0.99 output on both Python 2.7.1 and 3.6.3. Yours returns 0 on 2.7.1 because of integer division. Mar 7, 2018 at 12:35
  • For example, '%0.20f' % parse_percent('99%') returns '0.98999999999999999112' Mar 7, 2018 at 12:41
  • Well I wrote my method for Python 3, and I wrote it because none of the other answers to this question, while succinct, satisfied my requirement of consistently returning a float value without floating point errors.
    – Hat
    Mar 8, 2018 at 4:49
2

Based on the answer from @WKPlus this solution takes into account the locales where the decimal point is either a point . or a comma ,

float("-3,5%".replace(',','.')[:-1]) / 100
1

Another way: float(stringPercent[:-1]) / 100

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.