94

I want to fire off a function every 0.5 seconds and be able to start and stop and reset the timer. I'm not too knowledgeable of how Python threads work and am having difficulties with the python timer.

However, I keep getting RuntimeError: threads can only be started once when I execute threading.timer.start() twice. Is there a work around for this? I tried applying threading.timer.cancel() before each start.

Pseudo code:

t=threading.timer(0.5,function)
while True:
    t.cancel()
    t.start()

12 Answers 12

111

The best way is to start the timer thread once. Inside your timer thread you'd code the following

class MyThread(Thread):
    def __init__(self, event):
        Thread.__init__(self)
        self.stopped = event

    def run(self):
        while not self.stopped.wait(0.5):
            print("my thread")
            # call a function

In the code that started the timer, you can then set the stopped event to stop the timer.

stopFlag = Event()
thread = MyThread(stopFlag)
thread.start()
# this will stop the timer
stopFlag.set()
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Then it will finish it's sleep and stop afterwards. There is no way to forcibly suspend a thread in python. This is a design decision made by the python developers. However the net result will be the same. You thread will still run (sleep) for a short while, but it will not perform your function. – Hans Then Sep 15 '12 at 8:12
  • 13
    Well, actually, if you want to be able to stop the timer thread immediately, just use a threading.Event and wait instead of sleep. Then, to wake it up, just set the event. You don't even need the self.stopped then because you just check the event flag. – nneonneo Sep 15 '12 at 8:55
  • 3
    The event would be used strictly to interrupt the timer thread. Normally, the event.wait would just timeout and act like a sleep, but if you wanted to stop (or otherwise interrupt the thread) you'd set the thread's event and it would wake up immediately. – nneonneo Sep 15 '12 at 9:20
  • 2
    I have updated my answer to use event.wait(). Thanks for the suggestions. – Hans Then Aug 6 '13 at 9:28
  • 1
    just a question, how can I restart the thread after that? calling thread.start() gives me threads can only be started once – Motassem MK Feb 8 '17 at 22:13
32

From Equivalent of setInterval in python:

import threading

def setInterval(interval):
    def decorator(function):
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            stopped = threading.Event()

            def loop(): # executed in another thread
                while not stopped.wait(interval): # until stopped
                    function(*args, **kwargs)

            t = threading.Thread(target=loop)
            t.daemon = True # stop if the program exits
            t.start()
            return stopped
        return wrapper
    return decorator

Usage:

@setInterval(.5)
def function():
    "..."

stop = function() # start timer, the first call is in .5 seconds
stop.set() # stop the loop
stop = function() # start new timer
# ...
stop.set() 

Or here's the same functionality but as a standalone function instead of a decorator:

cancel_future_calls = call_repeatedly(60, print, "Hello, World")
# ...
cancel_future_calls() 

Here's how to do it without using threads.

| improve this answer | |
  • how would you change the interval when using a decorator? say i want to change .5s at runtime to 1 second or whatever? – lightxx Aug 29 '13 at 12:54
  • @lightxx: just use @setInterval(1). – jfs Aug 29 '13 at 13:14
  • hm. so either I'm a bit slow or you misunderstood me. I meant at runtime. I know i can change the decorator in the source code any time. what, for example, i had three functions, each decorated with a @setInterval(n). now at runtime i want to change the interval of function 2 but leave functions 1 and 3 alone. – lightxx Aug 30 '13 at 4:39
  • @lightxx: you could use different interface e.g., stop = repeat(every=second, call=your_function); ...; stop(). – jfs Aug 31 '13 at 4:29
  • 1
    @lightxx: here's a non-decorator stop = call_repeatedly(interval, your_function); ...; stop() implementation – jfs Mar 19 '14 at 9:39
30

Using timer threads-

from threading import Timer,Thread,Event


class perpetualTimer():

   def __init__(self,t,hFunction):
      self.t=t
      self.hFunction = hFunction
      self.thread = Timer(self.t,self.handle_function)

   def handle_function(self):
      self.hFunction()
      self.thread = Timer(self.t,self.handle_function)
      self.thread.start()

   def start(self):
      self.thread.start()

   def cancel(self):
      self.thread.cancel()

def printer():
    print 'ipsem lorem'

t = perpetualTimer(5,printer)
t.start()

this can be stopped by t.cancel()

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    I believe this code has a bug in the cancel method. When this is called, the thread is either 1) not running or 2) running. In 1) we are waiting to run the function, so cancel will work fine. in 2) we are currently running, so cancel will have no effect on the current execution. furthermore, the current execution reschedules itself so it will not have an effect in future etiher. – Rich Episcopo Dec 22 '16 at 0:28
  • 1
    This code creates a new thread every time the timer runs down. This is a colossal waste as compared to the accepted answer. – Adrian W Sep 8 '18 at 18:48
  • This solution should be avoided, for the reason mentioned above: it creates a new thread every time – Pynchia Mar 4 at 10:27
17

Improving a little on Hans Then's answer, we can just subclass the Timer function. The following becomes our entire "repeat timer" code, and it can be used as a drop-in replacement for threading.Timer with all the same arguments:

from threading import Timer

class RepeatTimer(Timer):
    def run(self):
        while not self.finished.wait(self.interval):
            self.function(*self.args, **self.kwargs)

Usage example:

def dummyfn(msg="foo"):
    print(msg)

timer = RepeatTimer(1, dummyfn)
timer.start()
time.sleep(5)
timer.cancel()

produces the following output:

foo
foo
foo
foo

and

timer = RepeatTimer(1, dummyfn, args=("bar",))
timer.start()
time.sleep(5)
timer.cancel()

produces

bar
bar
bar
bar
| improve this answer | |
  • Will this approach allow me to start/cancel/start/cancel the timer thread? – Paul Knopf Apr 3 '18 at 12:40
  • 1
    No. While this approach allows you to do anything you would with an ordinary Timer, you can't do that with an ordinary Timer. Since start/cancel is related to the underlying thread, if you try to .start() a thread which has previously been .cancel()'ed then you will get an exception, RuntimeError: threads can only be started once. – right2clicky Apr 5 '18 at 3:46
  • Really elegant solution! Odd that they didn't just include a class that does this. – Roger Dahl Sep 15 '19 at 18:15
  • this solution is very impressive, but I struggled to understand how it was designed from simply reading the Python3 threading Timer interface documentation. The answer appears to build on knowing the implementation by going into the threading.py module itself. – Adam.at.Epsilon Jun 15 at 8:40
13

In the interest of providing a correct answer using Timer as the OP requested, I'll improve upon swapnil jariwala's answer:

from threading import Timer


class InfiniteTimer():
    """A Timer class that does not stop, unless you want it to."""

    def __init__(self, seconds, target):
        self._should_continue = False
        self.is_running = False
        self.seconds = seconds
        self.target = target
        self.thread = None

    def _handle_target(self):
        self.is_running = True
        self.target()
        self.is_running = False
        self._start_timer()

    def _start_timer(self):
        if self._should_continue: # Code could have been running when cancel was called.
            self.thread = Timer(self.seconds, self._handle_target)
            self.thread.start()

    def start(self):
        if not self._should_continue and not self.is_running:
            self._should_continue = True
            self._start_timer()
        else:
            print("Timer already started or running, please wait if you're restarting.")

    def cancel(self):
        if self.thread is not None:
            self._should_continue = False # Just in case thread is running and cancel fails.
            self.thread.cancel()
        else:
            print("Timer never started or failed to initialize.")


def tick():
    print('ipsem lorem')

# Example Usage
t = InfiniteTimer(0.5, tick)
t.start()
| improve this answer | |
2

I had to do this for a project. What I ended up doing was start a separate thread for the function

t = threading.Thread(target =heartbeat, args=(worker,))
t.start()

****heartbeat is my function, worker is one of my arguments****

inside of my heartbeat function:

def heartbeat(worker):

    while True:
        time.sleep(5)
        #all of my code

So when I start the thread the function will repeatedly wait 5 seconds, run all of my code, and do that indefinitely. If you want to kill the process just kill the thread.

| improve this answer | |
2

I have changed some code in swapnil-jariwala code to make a little console clock.

from threading import Timer, Thread, Event
from datetime import datetime

class PT():

    def __init__(self, t, hFunction):
        self.t = t
        self.hFunction = hFunction
        self.thread = Timer(self.t, self.handle_function)

    def handle_function(self):
        self.hFunction()
        self.thread = Timer(self.t, self.handle_function)
        self.thread.start()

    def start(self):
        self.thread.start()

def printer():
    tempo = datetime.today()
    h,m,s = tempo.hour, tempo.minute, tempo.second
    print(f"{h}:{m}:{s}")


t = PT(1, printer)
t.start()

OUTPUT

>>> 11:39:11
11:39:12
11:39:13
11:39:14
11:39:15
11:39:16
...

Timer with a tkinter Graphic interface

This code puts the clock timer in a little window with tkinter

from threading import Timer, Thread, Event
from datetime import datetime
import tkinter as tk

app = tk.Tk()
lab = tk.Label(app, text="Timer will start in a sec")
lab.pack()


class perpetualTimer():

    def __init__(self, t, hFunction):
        self.t = t
        self.hFunction = hFunction
        self.thread = Timer(self.t, self.handle_function)

    def handle_function(self):
        self.hFunction()
        self.thread = Timer(self.t, self.handle_function)
        self.thread.start()

    def start(self):
        self.thread.start()

    def cancel(self):
        self.thread.cancel()


def printer():
    tempo = datetime.today()
    clock = "{}:{}:{}".format(tempo.hour, tempo.minute, tempo.second)
    try:
        lab['text'] = clock
    except RuntimeError:
        exit()


t = perpetualTimer(1, printer)
t.start()
app.mainloop()

An example of flashcards game (sort of)

from threading import Timer, Thread, Event
from datetime import datetime


class perpetualTimer():

    def __init__(self, t, hFunction):
        self.t = t
        self.hFunction = hFunction
        self.thread = Timer(self.t, self.handle_function)

    def handle_function(self):
        self.hFunction()
        self.thread = Timer(self.t, self.handle_function)
        self.thread.start()

    def start(self):
        self.thread.start()

    def cancel(self):
        self.thread.cancel()


x = datetime.today()
start = x.second


def printer():
    global questions, counter, start
    x = datetime.today()
    tempo = x.second
    if tempo - 3 > start:
        show_ans()
    #print("\n{}:{}:{}".format(tempo.hour, tempo.minute, tempo.second), end="")
    print()
    print("-" + questions[counter])
    counter += 1
    if counter == len(answers):
        counter = 0


def show_ans():
    global answers, c2
    print("It is {}".format(answers[c2]))
    c2 += 1
    if c2 == len(answers):
        c2 = 0


questions = ["What is the capital of Italy?",
             "What is the capital of France?",
             "What is the capital of England?",
             "What is the capital of Spain?"]

answers = "Rome", "Paris", "London", "Madrid"

counter = 0
c2 = 0
print("Get ready to answer")
t = perpetualTimer(3, printer)
t.start()

output:

Get ready to answer
>>> 
-What is the capital of Italy?
It is Rome

-What is the capital of France?
It is Paris

-What is the capital of England?
...
| improve this answer | |
  • if hFunction is blocking wouldn't this add some delay to subsequent starting times? Maybe you could swap the lines round so that handle_function starts timer first and then calls hFunction? – Moustache May 29 '18 at 12:01
1

I have implemented a class that works as a timer.

I leave the link here in case anyone needs it: https://github.com/ivanhalencp/python/tree/master/xTimer

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference. – Karl Richter Jun 28 '17 at 17:36
1
from threading import Timer
def TaskManager():
    #do stuff
    t = Timer( 1, TaskManager )
    t.start()

TaskManager()

Here is small sample, it will help beter understanding how it runs. function taskManager() at the end create delayed function call to it self.

Try to change "dalay" variable and you will able to see difference

from threading import Timer, _sleep

# ------------------------------------------
DATA = []
dalay = 0.25 # sec
counter = 0
allow_run = True
FIFO = True

def taskManager():

    global counter, DATA, delay, allow_run
    counter += 1

    if len(DATA) > 0:
        if FIFO:
            print("["+str(counter)+"] new data: ["+str(DATA.pop(0))+"]")
        else:
            print("["+str(counter)+"] new data: ["+str(DATA.pop())+"]")

    else:
        print("["+str(counter)+"] no data")

    if allow_run:
        #delayed method/function call to it self
        t = Timer( dalay, taskManager )
        t.start()

    else:
        print(" END task-manager: disabled")

# ------------------------------------------
def main():

    DATA.append("data from main(): 0")
    _sleep(2)
    DATA.append("data from main(): 1")
    _sleep(2)


# ------------------------------------------
print(" START task-manager:")
taskManager()

_sleep(2)
DATA.append("first data")

_sleep(2)
DATA.append("second data")

print(" START main():")
main()
print(" END main():")

_sleep(2)
DATA.append("last data")

allow_run = False
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    can you also tell a little more as to why this works? – minocha Jun 20 '16 at 19:12
  • your example was a little confusing, the first codeblock was all you needed to say. – Partack Dec 11 '19 at 21:31
0

I like right2clicky's answer, especially in that it doesn't require a Thread to be torn down and a new one created every time the Timer ticks. In addition, it's an easy override to create a class with a timer callback that gets called periodically. That's my normal use case:

class MyClass(RepeatTimer):
    def __init__(self, period):
        super().__init__(period, self.on_timer)

    def on_timer(self):
        print("Tick")


if __name__ == "__main__":
    mc = MyClass(1)
    mc.start()
    time.sleep(5)
    mc.cancel()
| improve this answer | |
0

This is an alternate implementation using function instead of class. Inspired by @Andrew Wilkins above.

Because wait is more accurate than sleep ( it takes function runtime into account ):

import threading

PING_ON = threading.Event()

def ping():
  while not PING_ON.wait(1):
    print("my thread %s" % str(threading.current_thread().ident))

t = threading.Thread(target=ping)
t.start()

sleep(5)
PING_ON.set()
| improve this answer | |
0

I have come up with another solution with SingleTon class. Please tell me if any memory leakage is here.

import time,threading

class Singleton:
  __instance = None
  sleepTime = 1
  executeThread = False

  def __init__(self):
     if Singleton.__instance != None:
        raise Exception("This class is a singleton!")
     else:
        Singleton.__instance = self

  @staticmethod
  def getInstance():
     if Singleton.__instance == None:
        Singleton()
     return Singleton.__instance


  def startThread(self):
     self.executeThread = True
     self.threadNew = threading.Thread(target=self.foo_target)
     self.threadNew.start()
     print('doing other things...')


  def stopThread(self):
     print("Killing Thread ")
     self.executeThread = False
     self.threadNew.join()
     print(self.threadNew)


  def foo(self):
     print("Hello in " + str(self.sleepTime) + " seconds")


  def foo_target(self):
     while self.executeThread:
        self.foo()
        print(self.threadNew)
        time.sleep(self.sleepTime)

        if not self.executeThread:
           break


sClass = Singleton()
sClass.startThread()
time.sleep(5)
sClass.getInstance().stopThread()

sClass.getInstance().sleepTime = 2
sClass.startThread()
| improve this answer | |

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