533

How to update value for a specific key in a dictionary Dictionary<string, int>?

2
  • I have a complex type stored as value in dictionary. When I want to change a property of an stored value, I get CS1612. Therefore I must take a way around: var v = dict[c]; v.dprop = c.sprop; dict[c] = v; – peter70 Nov 16 '18 at 15:03
  • @peter70, only with the structs, it is because structs are returned by value, so "updating" them would update only temporary, local copy of it. – greenoldman Nov 28 '20 at 6:24
874

Just point to the dictionary at given key and assign a new value:

myDictionary[myKey] = myNewValue;
9
  • So this simple method seems also to be a better substitute for the well known ".Add" and ".TryGetValue" method without the necessity to change the value. (?) At least, if it doesn't matter to overwrite keys, for example in a situation where it is not excluded that keys are written more than once in a loop. Or does somebody see any disadvantages? Especially because .Add has the ptifall for beginners that if the if-wrapper or TryGetValue is forgotten, it can work fine in tests and with other test data where the .Add is called twice for the same key it will throw an exception. – Philm Jan 14 '17 at 9:52
  • 4
    the interesting point of this operation is that, it UPSERT (key, value) into dictionary. brilliant! – Soren Jan 16 '17 at 7:51
  • 1
    As Pini stated, this should be the answer to the question. due the right thing and change it. – Leo Gurdian Mar 17 '17 at 18:53
  • 1
    @Philm, one huge disadvantage is, this approach is treated as modifying entire dictionary, in other words it is not just an update. – greenoldman Sep 27 '20 at 7:50
  • @greenoldman Are you sure? Why is this modifying the "entire dictionary"? Do you have a reference to what you're talking about? Surely this is an operator on the dictionary, and calling a method does exactly the same thing... – nevelis Nov 27 '20 at 19:00
201

It's possible by accessing the key as index

for example:

Dictionary<string, int> dictionary = new Dictionary<string, int>();
dictionary["test"] = 1;
dictionary["test"] += 1;
Console.WriteLine (dictionary["test"]); // will print 2
4
  • 13
    If there is no item "test" in the List, then list["test"] = list["test"] + 1; will raise KeyNotFoundException! The pure assignment of a non existing indexer will work. list["test"] = 1; – Steven Spyrka May 26 '15 at 9:38
  • Can you also use list["test"]++;? – aufty Jan 8 '16 at 18:02
  • 17
    dont call a dictionary list, call it dogs or cats or dict – Peter Mar 17 '16 at 9:35
  • 1
    @aufty you can write ++dictionary["test"]; or dictionary["test"]++; but only if there is an entry in the dictionary with the key value "test" — example: if(dictionary.ContainsKey("test")) ++dictionary["test"]; else dictionary["test"] = 1; // create entry with key "test" – gerryLowry May 20 '18 at 0:29
53

You can follow this approach:

void addOrUpdate(Dictionary<int, int> dic, int key, int newValue)
{
    int val;
    if (dic.TryGetValue(key, out val))
    {
        // yay, value exists!
        dic[key] = val + newValue;
    }
    else
    {
        // darn, lets add the value
        dic.Add(key, newValue);
    }
}

The edge you get here is that you check and get the value of corresponding key in just 1 access to the dictionary. If you use ContainsKey to check the existance and update the value using dic[key] = val + newValue; then you are accessing the dictionary twice.

7
  • 4
    Instead of dic.Add(key, newValue); you can use use dic[key] = newvalue;. – Macke Apr 13 '15 at 4:15
  • 1
    What happens if you do "dic[key] = value" and "key" doesn't exist? – matteopuc Aug 3 '15 at 11:41
  • 2
    @superpuccio you get a KeyNotFoundException – ntroncos Sep 21 '15 at 23:52
  • 11
    @ntroncos not true, it will add that key to the dictionary with the value provided. += will not work on a non-existing key though, since it is just syntactic sugar for dic[key] = value + dic[key]. – lastas Dec 18 '15 at 14:26
  • 2
    This should be the answer to the question as it regards updating the dictionary not just adding to it. – The Lonely Coder Dec 16 '16 at 9:41
15

Use LINQ: Access to dictionary for the key and change the value

Dictionary<string, int> dict = new Dictionary<string, int>();
dict = dict.ToDictionary(kvp => kvp.Key, kvp => kvp.Value + 1);
4
  • I don't even understand how this works but it's amazing – hexagonest Aug 26 '15 at 10:55
  • 4
    Creating another dictionary doesn't make sense to me for such simple thing. Check ccalboni's answer. – RollerCosta Feb 9 '17 at 7:49
  • 1
    i think it is a good answer. it doesn't require you to know each key string – Joseph Wu Apr 10 '17 at 23:15
  • 1
    Second line (LINQ statement) will create copy of whole dictionary each time. Not a good idea. – shaeed Sep 7 '20 at 7:06
9

Here is a way to update by an index much like foo[x] = 9 where x is a key and 9 is the value

var views = new Dictionary<string, bool>();

foreach (var g in grantMasks)
{
    string m = g.ToString();
    for (int i = 0; i <= m.Length; i++)
    {
        views[views.ElementAt(i).Key] = m[i].Equals('1') ? true : false;
    }
}
2
  • 14
    the m[i].Equals('1') already evaluates to a bool, so adding ? true : false is not necessary – Wessel van der Linden Apr 23 '14 at 11:26
  • I dont know how efficient is this logic, but I like the For loop idea. :) – Shri Nov 4 '14 at 14:37
1

This may work for you:

Scenario 1: primitive types

string keyToMatchInDict = "x";
int newValToAdd = 1;
Dictionary<string,int> dictToUpdate = new Dictionary<string,int>{"x",1};

if(!dictToUpdate.ContainsKey(keyToMatchInDict))
   dictToUpdate.Add(keyToMatchInDict ,newValToAdd );
else
   dictToUpdate[keyToMatchInDict] = newValToAdd; //or you can do operations such as ...dictToUpdate[keyToMatchInDict] += newValToAdd;

Scenario 2: The approach I used for a List as Value

int keyToMatch = 1;
AnyObject objInValueListToAdd = new AnyObject("something for the Ctor")
Dictionary<int,List<AnyObject> dictToUpdate = new Dictionary<int,List<AnyObject>(); //imagine this dict got initialized before with valid Keys and Values...

if(!dictToUpdate.ContainsKey(keyToMatch))
   dictToUpdate.Add(keyToMatch,new List<AnyObject>{objInValueListToAdd});
else
   dictToUpdate[keyToMatch] = objInValueListToAdd;

Hope it's useful for someone in need of help.

1
  1. update - modify existent only. To avoid side effect of indexer use:

    int val;
    if (dic.TryGetValue(key, out val))
    {
        // key exist
        dic[key] = val;
    }
    
  2. update or (add new if value doesn't exist in dic)

    dic[key] = val;
    

    for instance:

    d["Two"] = 2; // adds to dictionary because "two" not already present
    d["Two"] = 22; // updates dictionary because "two" is now present
    
0

This extension method allows a match predicate delegate as the dictionary key selector, and a separate delegate to perform the dictionary value replacement, so it's completely open as to the type of key/value pair being used:

public static void UpdateAll<TKey, TValue>(this IDictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary, Func<TKey, TValue, bool> matchPredicate, Func<TValue, TValue> updatePredicate)
{
  var keys = dictionary.Keys.Where(k => matchPredicate(k, dictionary[k])).ToList();
  foreach (var key in keys)
  {
    dictionary[key] = updatePredicate(dictionary[key]);
  }
}

Example usage:

    Dictionary<int, string> dict = new Dictionary<int, string>();
    dict.Add(1, "One");
    dict.Add(2, "Two");
    dict.Add(3, "Three");

    //Before
    foreach(var kvp in dict){
      Console.WriteLine(kvp.Value);
    }

    dict.UpdateAll(
        matchPredicate: (k, v) => k >= 2, //Update any dictionary value where the key is >= 2
        updatePredicate: (v) => v = v + " is greater than One"
      );

    //After
    foreach(var kvp in dict){
      Console.WriteLine(kvp.Value);
    }

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.