112

Just for curiosity I would like to know how to do this in the code below. I have been searching for an answer but is useless.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
data=np.random.exponential(scale=180, size=10000)
print ('el valor medio de la distribucion exponencial es: ')
print np.average(data)
plt.hist(data,bins=len(data)**0.5,normed=True, cumulative=True, facecolor='red', label='datos tamano paqutes acumulativa', alpha=0.5)
plt.legend()
plt.xlabel('algo')
plt.ylabel('algo')
plt.grid()
plt.show()
2
  • 7
    Spoiler, working on Windows: plt.get_current_fig_manager().window.state('zoomed') then plt.show().
    – Basj
    Sep 26 '18 at 12:18
  • 1
    doesn't work for me
    – Johan
    Sep 14 '20 at 9:40

22 Answers 22

181

I am on a Windows (WIN7), running Python 2.7.5 & Matplotlib 1.3.1.

I was able to maximize Figure windows for TkAgg, QT4Agg, and wxAgg using the following lines:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt

### for 'TkAgg' backend
plt.figure(1)
plt.switch_backend('TkAgg') #TkAgg (instead Qt4Agg)
print '#1 Backend:',plt.get_backend()
plt.plot([1,2,6,4])
mng = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
### works on Ubuntu??? >> did NOT working on windows
# mng.resize(*mng.window.maxsize())
mng.window.state('zoomed') #works fine on Windows!
plt.show() #close the figure to run the next section

### for 'wxAgg' backend
plt.figure(2)
plt.switch_backend('wxAgg')
print '#2 Backend:',plt.get_backend()
plt.plot([1,2,6,4])
mng = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
mng.frame.Maximize(True)
plt.show() #close the figure to run the next section

### for 'Qt4Agg' backend
plt.figure(3)
plt.switch_backend('QT4Agg') #default on my system
print '#3 Backend:',plt.get_backend()
plt.plot([1,2,6,4])
figManager = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
figManager.window.showMaximized()
plt.show()

if you want to maximize multiple figures you can use

for fig in figs:
    mng = fig.canvas.manager
    # ...

Hope this summary of the previous answers (and some additions) combined in a working example (at least for windows) helps. Cheers

8
  • 7
    ### works on Ubuntu??? >> did NOT working on windows mng.resize(*mng.window.maxsize()) #works perfect on linux for me
    – Daniele
    Jun 7 '15 at 16:47
  • 1
    @Daniele, your solution works for me on TkAgg on Ubuntu. Thanks! But it took me a while to parse ;) Maybe get rid of everything before "mng.resize...".
    – BenB
    Oct 4 '15 at 7:09
  • 1
    Is there an easy way to check what backend you are using? kinda used trial end error now. Jun 8 '16 at 21:00
  • 2
    Unfortunately, I tried your code with Qt5Agg, when I type in figManager.window.showMaximized(), the maximized fullscreen window just poped up. The next line: plt.show() just show another window which plots the data in a normal size window. Apr 27 '17 at 3:43
  • 3
    The Tk based solution does not work for me: _tkinter.TclError: bad argument "zoomed": must be normal, iconic, or withdrawn (Ubuntu 16.04).
    – bluenote10
    Jul 3 '18 at 12:22
87

With Qt backend (FigureManagerQT) proper command is:

figManager = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
figManager.window.showMaximized()
6
  • 1
    This still requires plt.show() afterwards. Great answer though, works on windows!
    – lucidbrot
    Sep 24 '18 at 7:39
  • '_tkinter.tkapp' object has bi attribute 'showMaximized'. Always more convinced that Python is a joke more than a language
    – HAL9000
    Sep 11 '19 at 15:46
  • 2
    @HAL9000 First, this is for Qt4, not Tk. Second, you're blaming a language for what is an external package design issue. You can have this kind of issue in any language. Nov 25 '19 at 14:46
  • 6
    I get AttributeError: '_tkinter.tkapp' object has no attribute 'showMaximized' on Windows.
    – Basj
    Nov 9 '20 at 11:48
  • Works with the PyQt5 backend for me.
    – Stefan
    Jan 21 at 17:34
52

This makes the window take up the full screen for me, under Ubuntu 12.04 with the TkAgg backend:

    mng = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
    mng.resize(*mng.window.maxsize())
6
  • 9
    Note that this has weird effects on a multiple monitors setup. The window will use up all monitors, instead of being maximized. Apr 17 '13 at 14:08
  • 4
    This will not create a maximized window (which should snap to the edges of the screen), but create a non-maximized window with the size of a maximized one. Feb 6 '17 at 11:45
  • This successfully maximizes the window in Ubuntu 14.04 too, keeping the top bar with the buttons we all know.
    – Irene
    Jun 12 '17 at 13:25
  • Works on Ubuntu 16.04 and linux mint. python2.7 tested Aug 11 '18 at 22:04
  • @user1202136 Worked fine for me in a 3-monitor setup. Jan 17 '20 at 12:19
44

For me nothing of the above worked. I use the Tk backend on Ubuntu 14.04 which contains matplotlib 1.3.1.

The following code creates a fullscreen plot window which is not the same as maximizing but it serves my purpose nicely:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
mng = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
mng.full_screen_toggle()
plt.show()
6
  • 2
    This was also the solution that worked for me (although it goes to full screen, not maximised window). Running on Redhat Enterprise Linux 6, python 2.7.10, matplotlib 1.4.3. Sep 9 '15 at 8:25
  • 1
    Worked for me within Visual Studio 2015 on Windows 10 x64, python 3.5 except that I could not access the window border to close the figure, as it was above the top screen pixels.
    – lightw8
    Aug 20 '16 at 0:26
  • 2
    For me, this doesn't create a maximized window either, but a fullscreen one. I didn't get any minimize, maximize/restore down and close buttons as normal windows have and I had to right-click on the window on the taskbar to be able to close it. Feb 6 '17 at 11:51
  • 2
    This goes full screen without showing the buttons that every window has. Tried on Ubuntu 14.04.
    – Irene
    Jun 12 '17 at 13:28
  • 1
    Working like a charm on Raspbian (jessie)
    – anatol
    Jul 9 '17 at 22:54
44

I usually use

mng = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
mng.frame.Maximize(True)

before the call to plt.show(), and I get a maximized window. This works for the 'wx' backend only.

EDIT:

for Qt4Agg backend, see kwerenda's answer.

7
  • 76
    Using this, I get mng.frame.Maximize(True) AttributeError: FigureManagerTkAgg instance has no attribute 'frame' in Matplotlib 1.2.0
    – Junuxx
    Dec 7 '12 at 14:01
  • 2
    It works with backend wx, I've updated the post accordingly. Likely the Tk backend you are using doesn't support this feature. Do you have the option to change matplotlib backend to 'wx'?
    – gg349
    Dec 10 '12 at 7:45
  • 13
    error on mac: mng.frame.Maximize(True) AttributeError: 'FigureManagerMac' object has no attribute 'frame'
    – user391339
    Jun 14 '16 at 15:53
  • 10
    Is there a known solution to do this on the MacOSXbackend? The FigureManagerMac seems to have neither the attribute windownor frame.
    – McLawrence
    Feb 18 '18 at 18:23
  • 4
    I have the same issue on Windows
    – RollRoll
    Nov 24 '18 at 20:46
43

This should work (at least with TkAgg):

wm = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
wm.window.state('zoomed')

(adopted from the above and Using Tkinter, is there a way to get the usable screen size without visibly zooming a window?)

5
  • 2
    Yay! This worked for me; it creates a maximized window that snaps to the edges of the screen and has the minimize, maximize/restore down and close buttons as it should. Feb 6 '17 at 11:53
  • 1
    However, you mean that this works with TkAgg, not TkApp, right? Feb 8 '17 at 15:42
  • Good catch (probably a typo)! TkAgg is a backend for Tk.
    – dinvlad
    Feb 16 '17 at 21:51
  • 4
    Just tested this for matplotlib 2 / python 3 . Works under windows! Mar 29 '20 at 16:43
  • Alas, does not work on Debian linux, which doesn't have the 'zoomed' state. Apr 9 at 16:44
12

My best effort so far, supporting different backends:

from platform import system
def plt_maximize():
    # See discussion: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/12439588/how-to-maximize-a-plt-show-window-using-python
    backend = plt.get_backend()
    cfm = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
    if backend == "wxAgg":
        cfm.frame.Maximize(True)
    elif backend == "TkAgg":
        if system() == "Windows":
            cfm.window.state("zoomed")  # This is windows only
        else:
            cfm.resize(*cfm.window.maxsize())
    elif backend == "QT4Agg":
        cfm.window.showMaximized()
    elif callable(getattr(cfm, "full_screen_toggle", None)):
        if not getattr(cfm, "flag_is_max", None):
            cfm.full_screen_toggle()
            cfm.flag_is_max = True
    else:
        raise RuntimeError("plt_maximize() is not implemented for current backend:", backend)
10

I get mng.frame.Maximize(True) AttributeError: FigureManagerTkAgg instance has no attribute 'frame' as well.

Then I looked through the attributes mng has, and I found this:

mng.window.showMaximized()

That worked for me.

So for people who have the same trouble, you may try this.

By the way, my Matplotlib version is 1.3.1.

4
  • Thanks! This solution worked well for me. Running on Redhat Enterprise Linux 6, python 2.7.10, matplotlib 1.4.3. Sep 9 '15 at 8:31
  • I know this will pop up a fullscreen window, but my plots will come up in a separate window when I type plt.show(). Not on this fullscreen window, any suggestion? Apr 27 '17 at 3:45
  • It also works on python 3.6 on Debian and with Qt backend.
    – pbalaga
    Jan 5 '19 at 19:44
  • this does not run on windows 10 64bit with python 3.7
    – George Sp
    Jan 26 '19 at 15:04
10

This is kind of hacky and probably not portable, only use it if you're looking for quick and dirty. If I just set the figure much bigger than the screen, it takes exactly the whole screen.

fig = figure(figsize=(80, 60))

In fact, in Ubuntu 16.04 with Qt4Agg, it maximizes the window (not full-screen) if it's bigger than the screen. (If you have two monitors, it just maximizes it on one of them).

2
  • Works for me! As I'm trying to get the size of the screen. Apr 27 '17 at 3:47
  • In case you use dual monitor, this spreads over both screens which is not practical.
    – Danijel
    Jun 15 at 13:10
9

I found this for full screen mode on Ubuntu

#Show full screen
mng = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
mng.full_screen_toggle()
6

The one solution that worked on Win 10 flawlessly.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

plt.plot(x_data, y_data)

mng = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
mng.window.state("zoomed")
plt.show()
3

Pressing the f key (or ctrl+f in 1.2rc1) when focussed on a plot will fullscreen a plot window. Not quite maximising, but perhaps better.

Other than that, to actually maximize, you will need to use GUI Toolkit specific commands (if they exist for your specific backend).

HTH

1
  • This explains which key I kept accidentally hitting that fullscreened my windows! (And how to undo it.)
    – cxrodgers
    Jul 6 '15 at 18:28
2

In my versions (Python 3.6, Eclipse, Windows 7), snippets given above didn't work, but with hints given by Eclipse/pydev (after typing: mng.), I found:

mng.full_screen_toggle()

It seems that using mng-commands is ok only for local development...

2

Try using 'Figure.set_size_inches' method, with the extra keyword argument forward=True. According to the documentation, this should resize the figure window.

Whether that actually happens will depend on the operating system you are using.

2

Here is a function based on @Pythonio's answer. I encapsulate it into a function that automatically detects which backend is it using and do the corresponding actions.

def plt_set_fullscreen():
    backend = str(plt.get_backend())
    mgr = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
    if backend == 'TkAgg':
        if os.name == 'nt':
            mgr.window.state('zoomed')
        else:
            mgr.resize(*mgr.window.maxsize())
    elif backend == 'wxAgg':
        mgr.frame.Maximize(True)
    elif backend == 'Qt4Agg':
        mgr.window.showMaximized()
2
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
def maximize():
    plot_backend = plt.get_backend()
    mng = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
    if plot_backend == 'TkAgg':
        mng.resize(*mng.window.maxsize())
    elif plot_backend == 'wxAgg':
        mng.frame.Maximize(True)
    elif plot_backend == 'Qt4Agg':
        mng.window.showMaximized()

Then call function maximize() before plt.show()

1
  • Doesn't work with 2 monitors. It simply changes the window site to the screen size (not monitor size), and also doesn't put it on the top-left pixel of the screen. @ch271828n solution worked fine
    – Alex
    May 29 '20 at 11:39
1

Try plt.figure(figsize=(6*3.13,4*3.13)) to make the plot larger.

1

Ok so this is what worked for me. I did the whole showMaximize() option and it does resize your window in proportion to the size of the figure, but it does not expand and 'fit' the canvas. I solved this by:

mng = plt.get_current_fig_manager()                                         
mng.window.showMaximized()
plt.tight_layout()    
plt.savefig('Images/SAVES_PIC_AS_PDF.pdf') 

plt.show()
1

For backend GTK3Agg, use maximize() -- notably with a lower case m:

manager = plt.get_current_fig_manager()
manager.window.maximize()

Tested in Ubuntu 20.04 with Python 3.8.

1

For Tk-based backend (TkAgg), these two options maximize & fullscreen the window:

plt.get_current_fig_manager().window.state('zoomed')
plt.get_current_fig_manager().window.attributes('-fullscreen', True)

When plotting into multiple windows, you need to write this for each window:

data = rasterio.open(filepath)

blue, green, red, nir = data.read()
plt.figure(1)
plt.subplot(121); plt.imshow(blue);
plt.subplot(122); plt.imshow(red);
plt.get_current_fig_manager().window.state('zoomed')

rgb = np.dstack((red, green, blue))
nrg = np.dstack((nir, red, green))
plt.figure(2)
plt.subplot(121); plt.imshow(rgb);
plt.subplot(122); plt.imshow(nrg);
plt.get_current_fig_manager().window.state('zoomed')

plt.show()

Here, both 'figures' are plotted in separate windows. Using a variable such as

figure_manager = plt.get_current_fig_manager()

might not maximize the second window, since the variable still refers to the first window.

0

This doesn't necessarily maximize your window, but it does resize your window in proportion to the size of the figure:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
F = gcf()
Size = F.get_size_inches()
F.set_size_inches(Size[0]*2, Size[1]*2, forward=True)#Set forward to True to resize window along with plot in figure.
plt.show() #or plt.imshow(z_array) if using an animation, where z_array is a matrix or numpy array

This might also help: http://matplotlib.1069221.n5.nabble.com/Resizing-figure-windows-td11424.html

0

The following may work with all the backends, but I tested it only on QT:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import time

plt.switch_backend('QT4Agg') #default on my system
print('Backend: {}'.format(plt.get_backend()))

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_axes([0,0, 1,1])
ax.axis([0,10, 0,10])
ax.plot(5, 5, 'ro')

mng = plt._pylab_helpers.Gcf.figs.get(fig.number, None)

mng.window.showMaximized() #maximize the figure
time.sleep(3)
mng.window.showMinimized() #minimize the figure
time.sleep(3)
mng.window.showNormal() #normal figure
time.sleep(3)
mng.window.hide() #hide the figure
time.sleep(3)
fig.show() #show the previously hidden figure

ax.plot(6,6, 'bo') #just to check that everything is ok
plt.show()

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