29

I tried

UPDATE TABLENAME SET COLUMNNAME = REPLACE(COLUMNNAME, '\t', '')

But I don't know how to write the TAB in t-sql

47

The ASCII code for tab is 9; you could try

update tablename set columnname = replace(columnname, char(9), '')
28

For TAB and ENTER

SELECT
    -- TRIM AND REPLACE `TAB` AND `ENTER`
    LTRIM(RTRIM(
        REPLACE(
            REPLACE(
                REPLACE(columnname, CHAR(9), ' '),
            CHAR(13), ' '),
        CHAR(10), ' ')
    ))
14

In the beginning of my TSql sProcs, I often put

   Declare @nl Char(2) = char(13) + char(10)
   Declare @tab Char(1) = char(9)
   etc...

Then you can use those declared variables anywhere in the rest of the proc without loss of clarity...

1
  • Thanks for this, I separated out the CRLF characters and added some more that we were having issues with when casting a varchar to xml: Declare @cr Char(1) = char(13) Declare @lf Char(1) = char(10) Declare @tab Char(1) = char(9) Declare @pound Char(1) = char(163) Declare @uScore Char(1) = char(150) I gave up trying to make this comment pretty, the Markdown Editing guidelines say double space for a new line, but that didn't work! – GarethPN Sep 29 '16 at 15:20
4

You can put a tab character in the string, just press the tab key.

That will work, but it's not very readable.

3

I found the solution:

In T-SQL you do not escape characters, you paste or type them directly into the quotes. It works even for \r\n (carriage return, new line = you press enter)

1
  • 16
    I would advise caution with this. Six months down the line, are you going to remember what all of those blank spaces wrapped in single-quotes are for? – Adrien Aug 7 '09 at 16:24
2

Checkout this function. This will remove every invalid char

-- =============================================
-- Author:      xenoivan
-- Description: clean invalid chars
-- =============================================
CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[fnClean] 
(
    @in NVARCHAR(MAX)
)
RETURNS  NVARCHAR(MAX)
AS
BEGIN
    -- Declare the return variable here
    DECLARE @out NVARCHAR(MAX)

    -- Add the T-SQL statements to compute the return value here
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@in,N'َ','')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,char(9),'')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,char(13),'')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,char(10),'')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'‬','')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'‬','')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'‬‬','')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'‎', '')--its a hidden character
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'‎', '')--ltr code
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'‎', '')--rtl code
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'۰', '0')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'۱', '1')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'۲', '2')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'۳', '3')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'۴', '4')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'۵', '5')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'۶', '6')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'۷', '7')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'۸', '8')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'۹', '9')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'٠', '0')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'١', '1')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'٢', '2')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'٣', '3')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'٤', '4')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'٥', '5')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'٦', '6')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'٧', '7')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'٨', '8')
    SELECT @out = REPLACE(@out,N'٩', '9');

    -- Return the result of the function
    RETURN @out

END
1
  • I would recomend using NCHAR() function. So instead of '' --ltr code you would use NCHAR(8206) --ltr code, or NCHAR(0x200E) --ltr code, which is more verbose and would survive even if you accidentally saved your file in a wrong encoding. – andowero Jun 4 at 8:15
2

One of the comments I tried above was only reading the data and not actually updating the data, I had the best success with the following

UPDATE Tbl
SET Tbl.[ColumnName] = LTRIM(RTRIM(REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(Tbl.[ColumnName], CHAR(9), ' '),CHAR(13), ' '),CHAR(10), ' ')))
FROM [TableName] AS Tbl

I know this is a old question hope this helps someone

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