248

This URL returns JSON:

{
  query: {
    count: 1,
    created: "2015-12-09T17:12:09Z",
    lang: "en-US",
    diagnostics: {},
    ...
  }
}

I tried this, and it didn't work:

responseObj = readJsonFromUrl('http://query.yahooapis.com/v1/publ...');
var count = responseObj.query.count;

console.log(count) // should be 1

How can I get a JavaScript object from this URL's JSON response?

2
  • 1
    What you have is a URL that returns a response containing a JSON string. Are you asking how to request something from a URL? Because that would depend a lot on the language or tool that you're using. Be more specific.
    – jonvuri
    Commented Sep 17, 2012 at 13:37
  • 1
    This question is confusing. Don't you get the JSON object by using the URL you mentioned? What do you mean by getting the JSON object from a URL? please clarify.
    – Steven
    Commented Sep 17, 2012 at 13:37

12 Answers 12

233

You can use jQuery .getJSON() function:

$.getJSON('http://query.yahooapis.com/v1/public/yql?q=select%20%2a%20from%20yahoo.finance.quotes%20WHERE%20symbol%3D%27WRC%27&format=json&diagnostics=true&env=store://datatables.org/alltableswithkeys&callback', function(data) {
    // JSON result in `data` variable
});

If you don't want to use jQuery you should look at this answer for pure JS solution.

2
  • 18
    Minor point but might be clearer if it stated 'The JSON is in the data variable' Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 14:18
  • 3
    The pure JavaScript example you point to is for JSONP, which won't work with the question.
    – SArcher
    Commented Feb 27, 2018 at 2:54
195

If you want to do it in plain javascript, you can define a function like this:

var getJSON = function(url, callback) {
    var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
    xhr.open('GET', url, true);
    xhr.responseType = 'json';
    xhr.onload = function() {
      var status = xhr.status;
      if (status === 200) {
        callback(null, xhr.response);
      } else {
        callback(status, xhr.response);
      }
    };
    xhr.send();
};

And use it like this:

getJSON('http://query.yahooapis.com/v1/public/yql?q=select%20%2a%20from%20yahoo.finance.quotes%20WHERE%20symbol%3D%27WRC%27&format=json&diagnostics=true&env=store://datatables.org/alltableswithkeys&callback',
function(err, data) {
  if (err !== null) {
    alert('Something went wrong: ' + err);
  } else {
    alert('Your query count: ' + data.query.count);
  }
});

Note that data is an object, so you can access its attributes without having to parse it.

6
  • why use .onload = function() { when you can use .onreadystatechange = function() { if (xhr.readState === 4) { I mean sure, it's shorter but you're sacrificing a great deal of support for saving a couple of characters. This is not code-golf
    – Downgoat
    Commented Jul 13, 2016 at 0:59
  • 5
    It's not only shorter, but it also seems to be a tad more reliable according to this post. And caniuse.com says it's supported by everything except IE8, so as long as you don't need to support IE8, I don't see why you wouldn't use onload. Commented Jul 14, 2016 at 10:43
  • @MikeySkullivan I wanted to know one thing, why is that i am getting responseText and responseXML as undefined though the response status = 200?
    – hrushi
    Commented Nov 13, 2016 at 18:06
  • 1
    @hrushi If they are undefined, you're accessing them in a wrong way or in the wrong context. Remember, you have to use xhr.responseText and xhr.responseXML and they are only available within the getJSON function definition block, not outside it. Commented Nov 15, 2016 at 11:56
  • 2
    @MitchellD Are you using Node.js? Then take a look over here. But next time try googling for the error first, the link I posted is the first result that comes up when I type the error into Google. Commented Jun 11, 2018 at 12:41
153

With Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge, and Webview you can natively use the fetch API which makes this a lot easier, and much more terse.

If you need support for IE or older browsers, you can also use the fetch polyfill.

let url = 'https://example.com';

fetch(url)
.then(res => res.json())
.then(out =>
  console.log('Checkout this JSON! ', out))
.catch(err => console.log(err));

MDN: Fetch API

Even though Node.js does not have this method built-in, you can use node-fetch which allows for the exact same implementation.

6
  • 8
    Ugh.. this doesn't even compile in IE11. Why is IE such junk?
    – dano
    Commented Aug 9, 2017 at 22:03
  • 5
    You can always use the github/fetch polyfill to overcome this issue.
    – DBrown
    Commented Aug 10, 2017 at 2:49
  • @dano it's the arrow functions. Use regular functions or Babel to transpile
    – Phil
    Commented Oct 10, 2019 at 5:46
  • 1
    @Phil thanks for pointing out ES6. The biggest issue with IE11 is that fetch is not a supported API: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Fetch_API It should also be known that the fetch polyfill needed for IE11 is purely ES5 (due to lack of support), so there is no actual need for ES6 transpilation unless you absolutely need it otherwise. If the only reason to add it is to support the fetch idiom (if the polyfill even supports it), using babel-polyfill is a better option. Best of luck!
    – DBrown
    Commented Oct 12, 2019 at 21:52
  • Firefox 104: Uncaught SyntaxError: expected expression, got keyword 'throw'
    – ar2015
    Commented Sep 6, 2022 at 19:44
46

ES8(2017) try

obj = await (await fetch(url)).json();

async function load() {
    let url = 'https://my-json-server.typicode.com/typicode/demo/db';
    let obj = await (await fetch(url)).json();
    console.log(obj);
}

load();

you can handle errors by try-catch

async function load() {
    let url = 'http://query.yahooapis.com/v1/publ...';
    let obj = null;
    
    try {
        obj = await (await fetch(url)).json();
    } catch(e) {
        console.log('error');
    }
    
    console.log(obj);
}

load();

1
  • 4
    This looks really nice. How is this compared to other methods? Commented Nov 26, 2020 at 11:48
9

Define a function like:

fetchRestaurants(callback) {
    fetch(`http://www.restaurants.com`)
       .then(response => response.json())
       .then(json => callback(null, json.restaurants))
       .catch(error => callback(error, null))
}

Then use it like this:

fetchRestaurants((error, restaurants) => {
    if (error) 
        console.log(error)
    else 
        console.log(restaurants[0])

});
4
  • 1
    Given that there are many existing answers, please mention what about this answer makes it worth adding to the discussion. Usage of fetch has been mentioned in several existing answers. Commented Oct 6, 2019 at 10:40
  • 3
    This is the only relevant answer in 2020. It is simply a fetch which needs a callback for when an asynchronous event is completed. Easy and elegant Commented Feb 10, 2020 at 13:23
  • why isn't fetch awaited in this case? I am confused, I keep seeing examples where it is awaited and being called plainly
    – Pynchia
    Commented Jun 14, 2020 at 14:06
  • Short and it works! Commented Oct 21, 2023 at 17:33
8

Axios is a promise based HTTP client for the browser and node.js.

It offers automatic transforms for JSON data and it's the official recommendation from the Vue.js team when migrating from the 1.0 version which included a REST client by default.

Performing a GET request

// Make a request for a user with a given ID
axios.get('http://query.yahooapis.com/v1/publ...')
  .then(function (response) {
    console.log(response);
  })
  .catch(function (error) {
    console.log(error);
  });

Or even just axios(url) is enough as a GET request is the default.

6

async function fetchDataAsync(url) {
    const response = await fetch(url);
    console.log(await response.json());
}

fetchDataAsync('paste URL');

3
  • 1
    Please describe something about your answer. Commented Aug 23, 2019 at 6:32
  • 2
    Given that there are many existing answers, please mention what about this answer makes it worth adding to the discussion. Usage of fetch has been mentioned in several existing answers. Usage of await/async with fetch, was described in Kamil's answer. Commented Oct 6, 2019 at 10:42
  • Best answer. Concise and worked for me.
    – ar2015
    Commented Sep 6, 2022 at 19:51
3
            async function Fetching()
            {
                const response = await fetch('https://business-api-account.github.io/API.json');
                const jsonData = await response.json();
                console.log(jsonData);
            }

            Fetching();

When fetching a file it is required to use an awaited asynchronous method call. The file content must be extracted asynchronously and awaited because the fetch() method is returning the response in with a promise, meaning that the response is promised, not guaranteed. By awaiting the call, the program will wait in the point where the method call is performed until the promise is returned, and not continue the execution if the promise was not received yet, with the file content or not.

2

as @DanAlboteanu answer in this page and some error corection of that javascript my suggested code is:

fetchRestaurants((error, data) => {
    if (error)
        console.log(error); 
    else
        console.log(data)

});

and fetchRestaurants method is(please replace your json url with {your url of json data}):

function fetchRestaurants(callback) {
    fetch("{your url of json data}")
       .then(response => response.json())
       .then(json => callback(null, json))
       .catch(error => callback(error, null))
}
0
//Resolved
const fetchPromise1 = fetch(url);
    fetchPromise1.then(response => {
      console.log(response);
    });


//Pending
const fetchPromise = fetch(url);
console.log(fetchPromise);
2
  • 2
    this is code only answer! add some explanation to the post Commented Aug 23, 2019 at 16:09
  • 2
    Given that there are many existing answers, please mention what about this answer makes it worth adding to the discussion. Usage of fetch has been mentioned in several existing answers. Commented Oct 6, 2019 at 10:41
0

this morning, i also had the same doubt and now its cleared i had just used JSON with 'open-weather-map'(https://openweathermap.org/) api and got data from the URL in the index.html file, the code looks like this:-

 //got location
 var x = document.getElementById("demo");
      if (navigator.geolocation) {
        navigator.geolocation.getCurrentPosition(weatherdata);
      } else { 
        x.innerHTML = "Geolocation is not supported by this browser.";
      }
    //fetch openweather map url with api key
    function weatherdata(position) {
//put corrdinates to get weather data of that location
      fetch('https://api.openweathermap.org/data/2.5/weather?lat='+position.coords.latitude+'&lon='+position.coords.longitude+'&appid=b2c336bb5abf01acc0bbb8947211fbc6')
      .then(response => response.json())
      .then(data => {
      console.log(data);
      document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = 
      '<br>wind speed:-'+data.wind.speed + 
      '<br>humidity :-'+data.main.humidity + 
      '<br>temprature :-'+data.main.temp  
      });
    }
  <div id="demo"></div>

i had give api key openly because i had free subscription, just have a free subscriptions in beginning. you can find some good free api's and keys at "rapidapi.com"

-1

You can access JSON data by using fetch() in JavaScript

Update url parameter of fetch() with your url.

fetch(url)
    .then(function(response){
        return response.json();
    })
    .then(function(data){
        console.log(data);
    })

Hope It helps, it worked perfectly for me.

1
  • 3
    This appears to be a duplicate of DBrown's answer. Please don't add duplicate answers. If there is something unique about this answer, then mention DBrown's answer, and explain what is different about yours. Commented Oct 6, 2019 at 10:35

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