25

I have such list in Python: [1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0]. Can I convert it to integer like as I've typed 0b10000000 (i.e. convert to 128)? I need also to convert sequences like [1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0] to integers (here it will return 0b1100000010000000, i.e. 259). Length of list is always a multiple of 8, if it is necessary.

7
  • This might help you: stackoverflow.com/questions/2576712/… – Markus Unterwaditzer Sep 17 '12 at 14:26
  • Where are these lists coming from? Are they originally character input? – Steven Rumbalski Sep 17 '12 at 14:32
  • 1
    They are calculated from integers. If you want I can post code here. – ghostmansd Sep 17 '12 at 14:35
  • @ghostmansd: I just wanted to make sure they weren't originally characters. That would have changed which answer was fastest. – Steven Rumbalski Sep 17 '12 at 14:40
  • @ghostmansd: What is the average length of your bitlist? At 64 bits the string version performs the best (on my computer). – Steven Rumbalski Sep 17 '12 at 15:11
53

You can use bitshifting:

out = 0
for bit in bitlist:
    out = (out << 1) | bit

This easily beats the "int cast" method proposed by A. R. S., or the modified cast with lookup proposed by Steven Rumbalski:

>>> def intcaststr(bitlist):
...     return int("".join(str(i) for i in bitlist), 2)
... 
>>> def intcastlookup(bitlist):
...     return int(''.join('01'[i] for i in bitlist), 2)
... 
>>> def shifting(bitlist):
...     out = 0
...     for bit in bitlist:
...         out = (out << 1) | bit
...     return out
... 
>>> timeit.timeit('convert([1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0])', 'from __main__ import intcaststr as convert', number=100000)
0.5659139156341553
>>> timeit.timeit('convert([1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0])', 'from __main__ import intcastlookup as convert', number=100000)
0.4642159938812256
>>> timeit.timeit('convert([1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0])', 'from __main__ import shifting as convert', number=100000)
0.1406559944152832
10
  • BTW, could you suggest the way to convert integer from 0b10000000 to 0b000001 without having to create list of bits? – ghostmansd Sep 17 '12 at 14:33
  • 3
    @ghostmansd: Use .format() string formatting: '0b{0:08b}'.format(integer) will format an integer to a 0-padded 8-character string with leading 0b. – Martijn Pieters Sep 17 '12 at 14:39
  • Yea that "int cast" method is what immediately sprung to my mind (seemed like a nice clean solution if you aren't too concerned with efficiency). But yes, this is clearly faster. – arshajii Sep 17 '12 at 14:39
  • Here's a much faster string version: int(''.join('01'[i] for i in bitlist), 2). Still not as fast as bitshifting. – Steven Rumbalski Sep 17 '12 at 14:44
  • @StevenRumbalski: Added it in the list of timings. – Martijn Pieters Sep 17 '12 at 14:46
15

...or using the bitstring module

>>> from bitstring import BitArray
>>> bitlist=[1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0]
>>> b = BitArray(bitlist)
>>> b.uint
128
2
  • I could use bitstring or bitarray modules before, but this time I can't. I need a solution which doesn't require additional packages. Thanks, however! – ghostmansd Sep 17 '12 at 14:35
  • 1
    you didn't state that in the question, so I thought I'd add a bitstring-solution as an alternative to Martijns excellent answer :-) – Fredrik Pihl Sep 17 '12 at 14:41
7

I came across a method that slightly outperforms Martijn Pieters solution, though his solution is prettier of course. I am actually a bit surprised by the results, but anyway...

import timeit

bit_list = [1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0]

def mult_and_add(bit_list):
    output = 0
    for bit in bit_list:
        output = output * 2 + bit
    return output

def shifting(bitlist):
     out = 0
     for bit in bitlist:
         out = (out << 1) | bit
     return out

n = 1000000

t1 = timeit.timeit('convert(bit_list)', 'from __main__ import mult_and_add as convert, bit_list', number=n)
print "mult and add method time is : {} ".format(t1)
t2 = timeit.timeit('convert(bit_list)', 'from __main__ import shifting as convert, bit_list', number=n)
print "shifting method time is : {} ".format(t2)

Result:

mult and add method time is : 1.69138722958 
shifting method time is : 1.94066818592 
3
  • Slightly surprising result, yes. I'd guess that multiplication by two is exactly the same as shifting by one, but it could be due to that an OR operation is slower than a XOR operation. Addition can be simplified to XOR in your case since you won't have a carry, because of the bit shift. – Zut Nov 2 '13 at 22:48
  • It would be very interesting to know why this could possibly be. Obviously at the processor hardware level, the shifting pattern is certainly correct and well known for decades. However possible special code optimizations which are not apply to shifting, and are to multiplication and addition, which allow the processors pre-execution and branching prediction to work better, or it unrolls the loop or does something. There is an explanation and in part it means python's bitwise operation support of or and shifting is not very good. – Gregory Morse Jul 12 '20 at 16:58
  • Oh so by the way in Python 3.7.7, this is still true... Python 3.7.7 (default, Mar 23 2020, 23:19:08) [MSC v.1916 64 bit (AMD64)] IPython 7.13.0 -- An enhanced Interactive Python. %timeit mult_and_add(bit_list) 957 ns ± 3.76 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each) %timeit shifting(bit_list) 1.33 µs ± 11.5 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each) – Gregory Morse Jul 12 '20 at 17:03
6

Try this one-liner:

int("".join(str(i) for i in my_list), 2)

If you're concerned with speed/efficiency, take a look at Martijn Pieters' solution.

2
  • Here's a much faster string version: int(''.join('01'[i] for i in bitlist), 2). Still not as fast as bitshifting. – Steven Rumbalski Sep 17 '12 at 14:39
  • @ghostmansd. At 64 bits the string version starts to perform faster (on my computer). – Steven Rumbalski Sep 17 '12 at 15:12
3

how about this:

out = sum([b<<i for i, b in enumerate(my_list)])

or in reverse order:

out = sum([b<<i for i, b in enumerate(my_list[::-1])])

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