33

Is there a PowerShell command to list all previously loaded variables?

I am running some PowerShell scripts in Visual Studio and would like to list all variables that are available in the current PowerShell session.

I have tried the command:

ls variable:*;

But it returns the following:

System.Management.Automation.PSVariable
System.Management.Automation.PSVariable
System.Management.Automation.PSVariable
System.Management.Automation.PSVariable
System.Management.Automation.PSVariable
System.Management.Automation.PSVariable
System.Management.Automation.PSVariable
System.Management.Automation.PSVariable
System.Management.Automation.PSVariable
System.Management.Automation.PSVariable
5
  • 2
    When you say parameters, what exactly do you mean? All the arguments provided to a script or a function? The arguments used when launching this specific powershell session? Available variables?
    – EBGreen
    Sep 17, 2012 at 19:44
  • ls variable:* should work (works for me at least). What host are you using which gives the bad output?
    – latkin
    Sep 17, 2012 at 20:14
  • Host? I am really new to PS, what is a host?
    – Zooking
    Sep 17, 2012 at 20:16
  • The powershell is executed in a Visual Studio plugin called Sitecore Rocks if that is what you are after.
    – Zooking
    Sep 17, 2012 at 20:23
  • 3
    It looks like the host is just executing .ToString() on these PSVariable objects, which spits out the type name and not the name/value information. In the PowerShell prompt (a host) the formatting engine does the formatting of object to compose a useful string to display to the host. Looks like this host is a few cans short of a full six pack. :-)
    – Keith Hill
    Sep 17, 2012 at 20:45

2 Answers 2

55

ls variable:* should work, or Get-Variable. If these are resulting in bad output, it's due to a poorly-implemented host, not with powershell itself. If you open the standard console host (run powershell.exe), you will see that these work fine.

If you need to work around a bad host, you might have better luck dumping everything to explicit strings:

Get-Variable | Out-String

or

Get-Variable |%{ "Name : {0}`r`nValue: {1}`r`n" -f $_.Name,$_.Value }
2
  • This worked fine, but for some reason it didn't show me the variables I expected to see. Thanks anyway.
    – Zooking
    Sep 18, 2012 at 7:12
  • If what you really want is the Windows environment variables, the ones you get with the "Set" command in a DOS shell, you want to use "dir env:\". PowerShell seems to have its own separate set of environment variables.
    – Menace
    Apr 28, 2015 at 15:57
8

Interestingly, you can just type variable, and that works too!

I figured this out because I was curious as to what ls variable:* was doing. Get-Help ls tells us that it's an alias for PowerShell's Get-ChildItem, which I know will list all of the children of an Object. So, I tried just variable, and voila!

Based on this and this, it seems that what ls variable:* is doing is telling it to do some sort of scope/namespace lookup using the * (all/any) wildcard on the variable list, which, in this case, seems extraneous (ls variable:* == ls variable: == variable).

1
  • You should put Get-ChildItem variable:* == there at the start perhaps. Apr 2, 2019 at 16:50

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