214

I'm using JAVA 1.6 and Jackson 1.9.9 I've got an enum

public enum Event {
    FORGOT_PASSWORD("forgot password");

    private final String value;

    private Event(final String description) {
        this.value = description;
    }

    @JsonValue
    final String value() {
        return this.value;
    }
}

I've added a @JsonValue, this seems to do the job it serializes the object into:

{"event":"forgot password"}

but when I try to deserialize I get a

Caused by: org.codehaus.jackson.map.JsonMappingException: Can not construct instance of com.globalrelay.gas.appsjson.authportal.Event from String value 'forgot password': value not one of declared Enum instance names

What am I missing here?

12 Answers 12

275

The serializer / deserializer solution pointed out by @xbakesx is an excellent one if you wish to completely decouple your enum class from its JSON representation.

Alternatively, if you prefer a self-contained solution, an implementation based on @JsonCreator and @JsonValue annotations would be more convenient.

So leveraging on the example by @Stanley the following is a complete self-contained solution (Java 6, Jackson 1.9):

public enum DeviceScheduleFormat {

    Weekday,
    EvenOdd,
    Interval;

    private static Map<String, DeviceScheduleFormat> namesMap = new HashMap<String, DeviceScheduleFormat>(3);

    static {
        namesMap.put("weekday", Weekday);
        namesMap.put("even-odd", EvenOdd);
        namesMap.put("interval", Interval);
    }

    @JsonCreator
    public static DeviceScheduleFormat forValue(String value) {
        return namesMap.get(StringUtils.lowerCase(value));
    }

    @JsonValue
    public String toValue() {
        for (Entry<String, DeviceScheduleFormat> entry : namesMap.entrySet()) {
            if (entry.getValue() == this)
                return entry.getKey();
        }

        return null; // or fail
    }
}
  • @Agusti please take a look at my question,what am i missing there stackoverflow.com/questions/30525986/enum-is-not-binding – Prabjot Singh May 29 '15 at 9:30
  • 22
    maybe obvious to some, but note that @ JsonValue is used for serialization and @ JsonCreator for deserialization. If you're not doing both you'll only need one or the other. – acvcu Oct 9 '15 at 20:19
  • 6
    I really dislike this solution for the simple fact that you introduce two sources of truth. The developer will always have to remember to add the name in two places. I much prefer a solution that just does the right thing without decorating the internals of an enum with a map. – mttdbrd Oct 10 '16 at 18:41
  • 2
    @ttdbrd how about this for unifying truths? gist.github.com/Scuilion/036c53fd7fee2de89701a95822c0fb60 – KevinO Sep 21 '17 at 2:10
  • 1
    Instead of static map you can use YourEnum.values() which give Array of YourEnum and iterate on it – Valeriy K. Mar 14 '19 at 7:56
198

Note that as of this commit in June 2015 (Jackson 2.6.2 and above) you can now simply write:

public enum Event {
    @JsonProperty("forgot password")
    FORGOT_PASSWORD;
}
  • 1
    nice solution. It's a shame I'm stuck with 2.6.0 bundled in Dropwizard :-( – Clint Eastwood May 18 '16 at 16:44
  • This will only serialize, not deserialize. – Cavyn VonDeylen Nov 1 '16 at 15:28
  • 1
    Unfortunately this does not return the property when converting your enum to a string. – Nicholas May 31 '17 at 16:02
  • 4
    This feature was deprecated since 2.8. – pqian Oct 10 '17 at 7:27
  • 1
    This solution works for both serialize and deserialize on Enum. Tested in 2.8. – Downhillski Apr 19 '18 at 16:19
87

You should create a static factory method which takes single argument and annotate it with @JsonCreator (available since Jackson 1.2)

@JsonCreator
public static Event forValue(String value) { ... }

Read more about JsonCreator annotation here.

  • 10
    This is the cleanest and most concise solution, the rest are just tons of boilerplate that could (and should!) be avoided at all costs! – Clint Eastwood Jul 1 '14 at 21:07
  • 4
    @JSONValue to serialize and @JSONCreator to deserialize. – Chiranjib Mar 27 '17 at 12:51
  • @JsonCreator public static Event valueOf(int intValue) { ... } to deserialize int to Event enumerator. – Eido95 Oct 3 '18 at 9:08
  • 1
    @ClintEastwood whether the other solutions should be avoided depends on whether you want to separate serialzation/ deserialization concerns from the enum or not. – Asa Nov 15 '18 at 5:18
41

Actual Answer:

The default deserializer for enums uses .name() to deserialize, so it's not using the @JsonValue. So as @OldCurmudgeon pointed out, you'd need to pass in {"event": "FORGOT_PASSWORD"} to match the .name() value.

An other option (assuming you want the write and read json values to be the same)...

More Info:

There is (yet) another way to manage the serialization and deserialization process with Jackson. You can specify these annotations to use your own custom serializer and deserializer:

@JsonSerialize(using = MySerializer.class)
@JsonDeserialize(using = MyDeserializer.class)
public final class MyClass {
    ...
}

Then you have to write MySerializer and MyDeserializer which look like this:

MySerializer

public final class MySerializer extends JsonSerializer<MyClass>
{
    @Override
    public void serialize(final MyClass yourClassHere, final JsonGenerator gen, final SerializerProvider serializer) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException
    {
        // here you'd write data to the stream with gen.write...() methods
    }

}

MyDeserializer

public final class MyDeserializer extends org.codehaus.jackson.map.JsonDeserializer<MyClass>
{
    @Override
    public MyClass deserialize(final JsonParser parser, final DeserializationContext context) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException
    {
        // then you'd do something like parser.getInt() or whatever to pull data off the parser
        return null;
    }

}

Last little bit, particularly for doing this to an enum JsonEnum that serializes with the method getYourValue(), your serializer and deserializer might look like this:

public void serialize(final JsonEnum enumValue, final JsonGenerator gen, final SerializerProvider serializer) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException
{
    gen.writeString(enumValue.getYourValue());
}

public JsonEnum deserialize(final JsonParser parser, final DeserializationContext context) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException
{
    final String jsonValue = parser.getText();
    for (final JsonEnum enumValue : JsonEnum.values())
    {
        if (enumValue.getYourValue().equals(jsonValue))
        {
            return enumValue;
        }
    }
    return null;
}
  • 3
    The usage of custom (de)serializer kills the simplicity (which is using Jackson is worth for, btw), so this is needed in really heavy situations. Use @JsonCreator, as described below, and check this comment – Dmitry Gryazin Oct 13 '14 at 13:37
  • 1
    This soluiton is best for the somewhat crazy problem introduced in the OPs question. The real issue here is that the OP wants to return the structured data in a rendered form. That is, they're returning data that already includes a user friendly string. But in order to turn the rendered form back into an identifier, we need some code that can reverse the transformation. The hacky accepted answer wants to use a map to handle the transformation, but requires more maintenance. With this solution, you can add new enumerated types and then your developers can get on with their jobs. – mttdbrd Apr 11 '17 at 5:00
33

I've found a very nice and concise solution, especially useful when you cannot modify enum classes as it was in my case. Then you should provide a custom ObjectMapper with a certain feature enabled. Those features are available since Jackson 1.6. So you only need to write toString() method in your enum.

public class CustomObjectMapper extends ObjectMapper {
    @PostConstruct
    public void customConfiguration() {
        // Uses Enum.toString() for serialization of an Enum
        this.enable(WRITE_ENUMS_USING_TO_STRING);
        // Uses Enum.toString() for deserialization of an Enum
        this.enable(READ_ENUMS_USING_TO_STRING);
    }
}

There are more enum-related features available, see here:

https://github.com/FasterXML/jackson-databind/wiki/Serialization-Features https://github.com/FasterXML/jackson-databind/wiki/Deserialization-Features

  • 10
    not sure why you need to extend the class. you can enable this feature on an instance of the ObjectMapper. – mttdbrd Oct 10 '16 at 18:54
  • +1 because he pointed me to the [READ|WRITE]_ENUMS_USING_TO_STRING which I can use in Spring application.yml – HelLViS69 Feb 15 '18 at 11:29
6

You can customize the deserialization for any attribute.

Declare your deserialize class using the annotationJsonDeserialize (import com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.annotation.JsonDeserialize) for the attribute that will be processed. If this is an Enum:

@JsonDeserialize(using = MyEnumDeserialize.class)
private MyEnum myEnum;

This way your class will be used to deserialize the attribute. This is a full example:

public class MyEnumDeserialize extends JsonDeserializer<MyEnum> {

    @Override
    public MyEnum deserialize(JsonParser jsonParser, DeserializationContext deserializationContext) throws IOException {
        JsonNode node = jsonParser.getCodec().readTree(jsonParser);
        MyEnum type = null;
        try{
            if(node.get("attr") != null){
                type = MyEnum.get(Long.parseLong(node.get("attr").asText()));
                if (type != null) {
                    return type;
                }
            }
        }catch(Exception e){
            type = null;
        }
        return type;
    }
}
  • Nathaniel Ford, got better ? – Fernando Gomes Jan 27 '16 at 19:14
  • 1
    Yes, this is a much better answer; it provides some context. I would go even further, though, and discuss why adding deserialization in this manner addresses the OP's specific obstacle. – Nathaniel Ford Jan 27 '16 at 19:57
6

Try this.


public enum Event {

   FORGOT_PASSWORD("forgot password");

    private final String value;

    private Event(final String description) {
        this.value = description;
    }

    private Event() {
        this.value = this.name();
    }

    @JsonValue
    final String value() {
        return this.value;
    }
}
5

There are various approaches that you can take to accomplish deserialization of a JSON object to an enum. My favorite style is to make an inner class:

import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonCreator;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonFormat;
import com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonProperty;
import org.hibernate.validator.constraints.NotEmpty;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.function.Function;
import java.util.stream.Collectors;

import static com.fasterxml.jackson.annotation.JsonFormat.Shape.OBJECT;

@JsonFormat(shape = OBJECT)
public enum FinancialAccountSubAccountType {
  MAIN("Main"),
  MAIN_DISCOUNT("Main Discount");

  private final static Map<String, FinancialAccountSubAccountType> ENUM_NAME_MAP;
  static {
    ENUM_NAME_MAP = Arrays.stream(FinancialAccountSubAccountType.values())
      .collect(Collectors.toMap(
        Enum::name,
        Function.identity()));
  }

  private final String displayName;

  FinancialAccountSubAccountType(String displayName) {
    this.displayName = displayName;
  }

  @JsonCreator
  public static FinancialAccountSubAccountType fromJson(Request request) {
    return ENUM_NAME_MAP.get(request.getCode());
  }

  @JsonProperty("name")
  public String getDisplayName() {
    return displayName;
  }

  private static class Request {
    @NotEmpty(message = "Financial account sub-account type code is required")
    private final String code;
    private final String displayName;

    @JsonCreator
    private Request(@JsonProperty("code") String code,
                    @JsonProperty("name") String displayName) {
      this.code = code;
      this.displayName = displayName;
    }

    public String getCode() {
      return code;
    }

    @JsonProperty("name")
    public String getDisplayName() {
      return displayName;
    }
  }
}
4

Here is another example that uses string values instead of a map.

public enum Operator {
    EQUAL(new String[]{"=","==","==="}),
    NOT_EQUAL(new String[]{"!=","<>"}),
    LESS_THAN(new String[]{"<"}),
    LESS_THAN_EQUAL(new String[]{"<="}),
    GREATER_THAN(new String[]{">"}),
    GREATER_THAN_EQUAL(new String[]{">="}),
    EXISTS(new String[]{"not null", "exists"}),
    NOT_EXISTS(new String[]{"is null", "not exists"}),
    MATCH(new String[]{"match"});

    private String[] value;

    Operator(String[] value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    @JsonValue
    public String toStringOperator(){
        return value[0];
    }

    @JsonCreator
    public static Operator fromStringOperator(String stringOperator) {
        if(stringOperator != null) {
            for(Operator operator : Operator.values()) {
                for(String operatorString : operator.value) {
                    if (stringOperator.equalsIgnoreCase(operatorString)) {
                        return operator;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
}
3

In the context of an enum, using @JsonValue now (since 2.0) works for serialization and deserialization.

According to the jackson-annotations javadoc for @JsonValue:

NOTE: when use for Java enums, one additional feature is that value returned by annotated method is also considered to be the value to deserialize from, not just JSON String to serialize as. This is possible since set of Enum values is constant and it is possible to define mapping, but can not be done in general for POJO types; as such, this is not used for POJO deserialization.

So having the Event enum annotated just as above works (for both serialization and deserialization) with jackson 2.0+.

2

Besides using @JsonSerialize @JsonDeserialize, you can also use SerializationFeature and DeserializationFeature (jackson binding) in the object mapper.

Such as DeserializationFeature.READ_UNKNOWN_ENUM_VALUES_USING_DEFAULT_VALUE, which give default enum type if the one provided is not defined in the enum class.

0

The simplest way I found is using @JsonFormat.Shape.OBJECT annotation for the enum.

@JsonFormat(shape = JsonFormat.Shape.OBJECT)
public enum MyEnum{
    ....
}

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