38

Is there any way to have a subquery return multiple columns in oracle db? (I know this specific sql will result in an error, but it sums up what I want pretty well)

select
    a.x,
    ( select b.y, b.z from b where b.v = a.v),
from a

I want a result like this:

a.x | b.y | b.z
---------------
1   | 2   | 3

I know it is possible to solve this problem through joins, but that is not what I am asking for.

My Question is simply if there is any way, to get two or more values out of a subquery? Maybe some workaround using dual? So that there is NO actual join, but a new subquery for each row?

EDIT: This is a principle question. You can solve all these problems using join, I know. You do not need subqueries like this at all (not even for one column). But they are there. So can I use them in that way or is it simply impossible?

4
  • 2
    Why don't you want to use joins?
    – podiluska
    Sep 18, 2012 at 8:07
  • Can you not use a join on b.v = a.v and then you can easily get your fields.
    – skyfoot
    Sep 18, 2012 at 8:08
  • I know it is not efficient but you could repeat the subquery per column you want in the output?
    – jpsfer
    Sep 18, 2012 at 8:09
  • 1
    It's a performance thing, why I came to think about this, quite often subqueries are faster (at least when loading just a few records) depending on how the optimizer goes about things. Especially with user defined functions... BUT I'm asking a principle question (Also if you use joins, you do not need subqueries like this at all, and they are there, so why not get more than one value).
    – John Smith
    Sep 18, 2012 at 8:13

7 Answers 7

24

A Subquery in the Select clause, as in your case, is also known as a Scalar Subquery, which means that it's a form of expression. Meaning that it can only return one value.

I'm afraid you can't return multiple columns from a single Scalar Subquery, no.

Here's more about Oracle Scalar Subqueries:

http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14200/expressions010.htm#i1033549

23

It's incorrect, but you can try this instead:

select
    a.x,
    ( select b.y from b where b.v = a.v) as by,
    ( select b.z from b where b.v = a.v) as bz
from a

you can also use subquery in join

 select
        a.x,
        b.y,
        b.z
    from a
    left join (select y,z from b where ... ) b on b.v = a.v

or

   select
        a.x,
        b.y,
        b.z
    from a
    left join b on b.v = a.v
5
  • 1
    Simplified, no need for derived table there. Sep 18, 2012 at 10:23
  • 1
    Yes, of course, but when OP wants to add more conditions to subquery?
    – Robert
    Sep 18, 2012 at 10:28
  • Then, you can append those conditions at the ON clause. Sep 18, 2012 at 10:30
  • Yes he can, but I leave query with subquery, maybe for OP it will useful.
    – Robert
    Sep 18, 2012 at 10:31
  • Yes, it could be useful for others too (remove the second join though, after the parenthesis) Sep 18, 2012 at 10:33
8

Here are two methods to get more than 1 column in a scalar subquery (or inline subquery) and querying the lookup table only once. This is a bit convoluted but can be the very efficient in some special cases.

  1. You can use concatenation to get several columns at once:

    SELECT x, 
           regexp_substr(yz, '[^^]+', 1, 1) y,
           regexp_substr(yz, '[^^]+', 1, 2) z
      FROM (SELECT a.x,
                   (SELECT b.y || '^' || b.z yz
                      FROM b
                     WHERE b.v = a.v)
                      yz
              FROM a)
    

    You would need to make sure that no column in the list contain the separator character.

  2. You could also use SQL objects:

    CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE b_obj AS OBJECT (y number, z number);
    
    SELECT x, 
           v.yz.y y,
           v.yz.z z
      FROM (SELECT a.x,
                   (SELECT b_obj(y, z) yz
                      FROM b
                     WHERE b.v = a.v)
                      yz
              FROM a) v
    
1
  • 1
    warning : concatenation do not work with null values !
    – fred727
    Mar 4, 2020 at 14:29
3

Can't you use JOIN like this one?

SELECT
a.x , b.y, b.z 
FROM a 
LEFT OUTER JOIN b ON b.v = a.v

(I don't know Oracle Syntax. So I wrote SQL syntax)

2
  • 1
    Perhaps you should use a Left outer join. Sep 18, 2012 at 8:12
  • 2
    For this specific problem I can use join, maybe for all problems like this. I am not asking for a solution to the problem, but if there is a way to do it with subqueries.
    – John Smith
    Sep 18, 2012 at 8:14
2

In Oracle query

select a.x
            ,(select b.y || ',' || b.z
                from   b
                where  b.v = a.v
                and    rownum = 1) as multple_columns
from   a

can be transformed to:

select a.x, b1.y, b1.z
from   a, b b1
where  b1.rowid = (
       select b.rowid
       from   b
       where  b.v = a.v
       and    rownum = 1
)

Is useful when we want to prevent duplication for table A. Similarly, we can increase the number of tables:

.... where (b1.rowid,c1.rowid) = (select b.rowid,c.rowid ....
2

you can use cross apply:

select
    a.x,
    bb.y,
    bb.z
from
    a
    cross apply
    (   select b.y, b.z
        from b
        where b.v = a.v
    ) bb

If there will be no row from b to mach row from a then cross apply wont return row. If you need such a rows then use outer apply

If you need to find only one specific row for each of row from a, try:

    cross apply
    (   select top 1 b.y, b.z
        from b
        where b.v = a.v
        order by b.order
    ) bb
1
  • late to the party but this is nothing else than an inner join they just added this for compatibility reasons.
    – Epicycle
    Feb 24 at 18:23
1

View this web: http://www.w3resource.com/sql/subqueries/multiplee-row-column-subqueries.php

Use example

select ord_num, agent_code, ord_date, ord_amount  
from orders  
where(agent_code, ord_amount) IN  
(SELECT agent_code, MIN(ord_amount)  
FROM orders   
GROUP BY agent_code);    

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