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When handling pull requests on GitHub, often I want to merge in commits from a branch with no changes. However, I would like to commit something just after the merge. I don't want to git commit --amend because that would change the commit I'm bringing in, so tracking the change gets more complicated.

Is there a way to git commit nothing but a message? The reason is because I might want to mention something in the Pull Request -- a URL pointing to a test case, or mention some other pull request so I can use a commit hook like Closes #123 in addition to the original pull request.

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    Would something like a note serve your need or do you want it to be a commit?
    – Roman
    Commented Sep 18, 2012 at 14:46
  • @R0MANARMY I like the --allow-empty but it might be an abuse; I bet this git note business is probably more correct. I'll need to try it. I wonder if it these notes would show up in the history of a GitHub Pull Request.
    – Dead Pixel
    Commented Sep 29, 2012 at 15:52
  • I think in this case femaref's answer is best since it would let you put the message you want into the merge commit directly.
    – Roman
    Commented Sep 29, 2012 at 16:09

2 Answers 2

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To commit an empty commit, use git commit --allow-empty.

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  • This works like a champ and seems easier than @Femaref's suggestion, thanks!
    – Dead Pixel
    Commented Sep 21, 2012 at 18:02
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You can use git merge --no-commit branch to make the merge but not autocommit. You are now able to tweak the actual commit like if the merge failed, including changing the commit message.

Furthermore, you are able to enter a message by git merge -m "message" branch, which is added to the merge commit.

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    Add --no-ff to explicitly generate a merge commit even if it is a fast forward.
    – Femaref
    Commented Sep 18, 2012 at 15:43

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