32

Is there any way in c# .NET 2.0! to combine multiple Predicates?

Let's say I have the following code.

List<string> names = new List<string>();
names.Add("Jacob");
names.Add("Emma");
names.Add("Michael");
names.Add("Isabella");
names.Add("Ethan");
names.Add("Emily");

List<string> filteredNames = names.FindAll(StartsWithE);

static bool StartsWithE(string s)
{
    if (s.StartsWith("E"))
    {
        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        return false;
    }
}

This gives me:

Emma
Ethan
Emily

So this is pretty cool stuff, but I know want to be able to filter using multiple predicates.

So I want to be able to say something like this:

List<string> filteredNames = names.FindAll(StartsWithE OR StartsWithI);

In order to get:

Emma
Isabella
Ethan
Emily

How can I achieve this? Currently I am just filtering the complete list twice and combining the results afterwards. But unfortunately this is quite inefficent and even more importantly I lose the original sort order, which is not acceptable in my situation.

I also need to be able to iterate over any number of filters/predicates as there can be quite a lot.

Again it needs to be a .NET 2.0 solution unfortunately I can't use a newer version of the framework

Thanks a lot.

60

How about:

public static Predicate<T> Or<T>(params Predicate<T>[] predicates)
{
    return delegate (T item)
    {
        foreach (Predicate<T> predicate in predicates)
        {
            if (predicate(item))
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    };
}

And for completeness:

public static Predicate<T> And<T>(params Predicate<T>[] predicates)
{
    return delegate (T item)
    {
        foreach (Predicate<T> predicate in predicates)
        {
            if (!predicate(item))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    };
}

Then call it with:

List<string> filteredNames = names.FindAll(Helpers.Or(StartsWithE, StartsWithI));

Another alternative would be to use multicast delegates and then split them using GetInvocationList(), then do the same thing. Then you could do:

List<string> filteredNames = names.FindAll(Helpers.Or(StartsWithE+StartsWithI));

I'm not a huge fan of the latter approach though - it feels like a bit of an abuse of multicasting.

  • Very Handy. Needed multiple predicates for a filter on ICollectionView. – pStan Sep 17 '14 at 4:11
  • The whole function can be shortened to return item => predicates.All(predicate => predicate(item)); – NibblyPig Oct 9 '14 at 14:25
  • @SLC: Sure - if you're using LINQ. Note that the question required .NET 2.0. (They might have been able to use lambda expressions, but we didn't know which version of VS the OP was using.) – Jon Skeet Oct 9 '14 at 14:45
30

I guess you could write something like this:

Func<string, bool> predicate1 = s => s.StartsWith("E");
Func<string, bool> predicate2 = s => s.StartsWith("I");
Func<string, bool> combinedOr = s => (predicate1(s) || predicate2(s));
Func<string, bool> combinedAnd = s => (predicate1(s) && predicate2(s));

... and so on.

  • Nice solution :) – Alexander Derck Dec 18 '15 at 7:56
  • don't you need to invoke the predicate Funcs in the combined Funcs? – Glen Thomas Dec 21 '18 at 10:27
5

I just recently came up with a solution similar to this problem, which could be also helpful. I expanded the FindAll method for lists, allowing me to stack predicates in lists as I needed:

public static class ExtensionMethods
{
    public static List<T> FindAll<T> (this List<T> list, List<Predicate<T>> predicates)
    {
        List<T> L = new List<T> ();
        foreach (T item in list)
        {
            bool pass = true;
            foreach (Predicate<T> p in predicates)
            {
                if (!(p (item)))
                {
                    pass = false;
                    break;
                }
            }
            if (pass) L.Add (item);
        }
        return L;
    }
}

It returns a list with only the items matching all given predicates. Of course it can easily be altered to OR all predicates instead of AND. But with that alone one can assemble quite a good variety of logical combinations.

Usage:

{
    List<Predicate<int>> P = new List<Predicate<int>> ();
    P.Add (j => j > 100);
    P.Add (j => j % 5 == 0 || j % 7 == 0);
    P.Add (j => j < 1000);

    List<int> L = new List<int> () { 0, 1, 2, ... 999, 1000 }
    List<int> result = L.FindAll (P);

    // result will contain: 105, 110, 112, 115, 119, 120, ... 994, 995 
}
  • Your code has a bug. The first break still results in the item getting added to the list...even though a predicate has returned false. – Myles J Nov 8 '18 at 11:55
  • @MylesJ - You are right, it is fixed now. Thanks for notifying me! – Battle Nov 8 '18 at 14:34
1

In .NET 2.0, there are anonymous delegates which you can use there:

List<string> filteredNames = names.FindAll(
   delegate(string s) { return StartsWithE(s) OR StartsWithI(s); }
);

In fact, you can use it to replace your functions as well:

List<string> filteredNames = names.FindAll(
   delegate(string s) { return s.StartsWith("E") || s.StartsWith("I"); }
);
0

You could create a third predicate that internally ORs the results together. I think you could do this on the fly using a lambda expression. Something like this(this is not a lambda expression as I'm not too good with that snytax):

static bool StartsWithEorI(string s)
{
    return StartsWithE(s) || StartsWithI(s);
}
  • Sure I could but like in this example there is huge number of combinations. not even thinking about combining three filters... Also again unfortunately I can use ONLY .NET 2.0 – eric Aug 8 '09 at 7:26
  • Ah that is unfortunate. I'm sure if you had anonymous delegates or lambda expressions, it would give you that "on the fly" combining power you want. – AaronLS Aug 8 '09 at 7:30
0

You could wrap the predicate method into a class and have the constructor accept an array of strings to test for:

class StartsWithPredicate
{
    private string[] _startStrings;
    public StartsWithPredicate(params string[] startStrings)
    {
        _startStrings = startStrings;
    }
    public bool StartsWith(string s)
    {
        foreach (var test in _startStrings)
        {
            if (s.StartsWith(test))
            {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
}

Then you can make a call like this:

List<string> filtered = names.FindAll((new StartsWithPredicate("E", "I")).StartsWith);

That way you can test for any combination of input strings without needing to extend the code base with new variations of the StartsWith method.

0

Having used this pattern extensively with the above 'params' array method, I was intrigued by recently learning about the Multicast delegate. Since delegates inherently support a list (or multicast), you can skip the params[] pattern and just supply a single delegate to your Test() function. You will need to call GetInvokationList on the supplied Predicate<>. See this: Multicast delegate of type Func (with return value)?

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