63

Assume I have an object:

var obj = {
  foo:"bar",
  fizz:"buzz"
};

I need to access a property of that object dynamically like so:

var objSetter = function(prop,val){
  obj[prop] = val;
}

No problems there, except for that prop needs to be case insensitive in case the property name is passed into the function as, say, Foo instead of foo.

So how can I point to an object's property by name without regard to case? I would like to avoid iterating the entire object if possible.

  • 5
    You can't. The language is case sensitive. Think about obj = {foo: true, Foo: false} – user123444555621 Sep 18 '12 at 20:24
  • Always keep your actual property names as all lower-case (or upper), and then convert when querying. – Pointy Sep 18 '12 at 20:25
  • if you expect "foo" instead of "Foo", you may convert prop to lower before using it. – Claudio Redi Sep 18 '12 at 20:25
  • 1
    Look at JavaScript proxy objects to implement was is effectively a means of changing a wildcard getter: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Zach Smith Sep 26 '17 at 8:42
  • Do NOT do this. Stop providing mechanisms to allow sloppy development. Keys are case sensitive. If you allow someone else to use a key with different case then you are allowing them to create crappy code that is difficult to maintain, not to mention slower since you have to run special code to allow the keys to match when they should not. – Intervalia Aug 16 '19 at 20:35

11 Answers 11

24

Compare all the properties of obj with prop.

var objSetter = function(prop,val){
  prop = (prop + "").toLowerCase();
  for(var p in obj){
     if(obj.hasOwnProperty(p) && prop == (p+ "").toLowerCase()){
           obj[p] = val;
           break;
      }
   }
}
  • 2
    Thanks. This will certainly work, but I am hoping to avoid iterating over entire objects. I will edit my post to make that more clear. Thanks again. – Matt Cashatt Sep 18 '12 at 20:33
  • Thanks Shusl, looks like an iteration is my only option. Also, can you please tell me what the + "" is for? Is this just for string conversion? – Matt Cashatt Sep 18 '12 at 20:38
  • 1
    Making sure that toLowerCase is being applied on string. Eg. (1 + "") will convert 1 to "1". – Anoop Sep 18 '12 at 20:47
  • 14
    There is no need to coerce p to string, ECMA-262 specifies Object properties as strings, any user agent or host that was non–compliant would have serious problems. There is also no need for break, you should use return. – RobG Sep 18 '12 at 21:05
  • 1
    I tried this on an object with over 1 million keys and it is intolerably slow. A better approach would be to use a proxy object (developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/…). Or just add keys to the dictionary as upper case to begin with if your use-case allows that – Zach Smith Sep 26 '17 at 8:38
21

Try this:

var myObject = { "mIxeDCaSEKeY": "value" };

var searchKey = 'mixedCaseKey';
myObject[Object.keys(myObject).find(key => key.toLowerCase() === searchKey.toLowerCase())];

You can alternatively already provide the searchKey in lowercase.

If you want it as a function:

/**
  * @param {Object} object
  * @param {string} key
  * @return {any} value
 */
function getParameterCaseInsensitive(object, key) {
  return object[Object.keys(object)
    .find(k => k.toLowerCase() === key.toLowerCase())
  ];
}

If the object can't be found, then it'll return undefined, just like normal.

If you need to support older browsers, then you can use filter instead:

function getParameterCaseInsensitive(object, key) {
  return object[Object.keys(object).filter(function(k) {
    return k.toLowerCase() === key.toLowerCase();
  })[0]];
}

I suggest using the polyfills for Object.keys() and Array.filter() if you need even older support.

9

For this, I prefer using the prototype over a standalone function just for ease of use and expressiveness. I just don't like funneling objects into functions if I don't have to.

Also, while the accepted answer works, I wanted a more comprehensive solution for both getting and setting that would behave as much like the native dot notation or bracket notation as possible.

With that in mind, I created a couple prototype functions for setting/getting an object property without regard to case. You have to remember to be VERY responsible when adding to the Object prototype. Especially when using JQuery and other libraries. Object.defineProperty() with enumerable set to false was used specifically to avoid conflict with JQuery. I also didn't bother naming the functions anything that indicates they are case-insensitive, but you certainly could. I like shorter names.

Here's the getter:

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "getProp", {
    value: function (prop) {
        var key,self = this;
        for (key in self) {
            if (key.toLowerCase() == prop.toLowerCase()) {
                return self[key];
            }
        }
    },
    //this keeps jquery happy
    enumerable: false
});

Here's the setter:

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "setProp", {
    value: function (prop, val) {
        var key,self = this;
        var found = false;
        if (Object.keys(self).length > 0) {
            for (key in self) {
                if (key.toLowerCase() == prop.toLowerCase()) {
                    //set existing property
                    found = true;                        
                    self[key] = val;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        if (!found) {
            //if the property was not found, create it
            self[prop] = val;
        }  

        return val;
    },
    //this keeps jquery happy
    enumerable: false
});

Now that we've created those functions, our code is super clean and concise and just works.

Case-insensitive getting:

var obj = {foo: 'bar', camelCase: 'humpy'}

obj.getProp("FOO");          //returns 'bar'
obj.getProp("fOO");          //returns 'bar'
obj.getProp("CAMELCASE");    //returns 'humpy' 
obj.getProp("CamelCase");    //returns 'humpy'

Case-insensitive setting:

var obj = {foo: 'bar', camelCase: 'humpy'}

obj.setProp('CAmelCasE', 'super humpy');     //sets prop 'camelCase' to 'super humpy'
obj.setProp('newProp', 'newval');      //creates prop 'newProp' and sets val to 'newval'  
obj.setProp('NewProp', 'anotherval');  //sets prop 'newProp' to 'anotherval'
6

Yet another variation on those already presented which pushes the iteration down into the Underscore/Lodash findKey function:

var _ = require('underscore');
var getProp = function (obj, name) {
    var realName = _.findKey(obj, function (value, key) {
        return key.toLowerCase() === name.toLowerCase();
    });
    return obj[realName];
};

For example:

var obj = { aa: 1, bB: 2, Cc: 3, DD: 4 };
getProp(obj, 'aa'); // 1
getProp(obj, 'AA'); // 1
getProp(obj, 'bb'); // 2
getProp(obj, 'BB'); // 2
getProp(obj, 'cc'); // 3
getProp(obj, 'CC'); // 3
getProp(obj, 'dd'); // 4
getProp(obj, 'DD'); // 4
getProp(obj, 'EE'); // undefined
  • How does the underscore library implement this? I.e. I'm looking for a way that doesn't involve a linear search of some object's keys – Zach Smith Sep 26 '17 at 8:40
  • 2
    @ZachSmith It's O(n); see here. – Rusty Shackleford Sep 26 '17 at 17:23
3

You could do this in order to "normalize" prop

 var normalizedProp = prop.toLowerCase();
 obj[normalizedProp] = val;
  • 1
    Thanks. I see how to cast prop to lowercase, but what if I can't guarantee that the actual property name will be all lowercase? Maybe I am missing something? – Matt Cashatt Sep 18 '12 at 20:32
  • 1
    @MatthewPatrickCashatt You're not missing anything: there is nothing to miss -- because there is nothing in the language to help here :) – user166390 Sep 18 '12 at 20:39
  • 2
    Reason for the down vote: This doesn't answer the question as it assumes, like @RobG's answer, that property is lowercase. – Matt Goodwin Oct 16 '15 at 17:09
1

why would we do it that complicated when we simply can make it all lower case:

    var your_object = { 
"chickago" : 'hi' ,
 "detroit" : 'word', 
 "atlanta" : 'get r dun',     
GetName: function (status) {
        return this[status].name;
    } };

to call it: your_object.GetName(your_var.toLowerCase());

  • 4
    This assumes that you have control over the object creation and that the keys in the object are lower case – velop Dec 14 '18 at 11:23
1

It seems to me like a good candidate for Proxy with traps to convert string keys to either upper case or lower case and behaving like a regular object. This works with either notation: dots or braquets

Here is the code:

'use strict';

function noCasePropObj(obj)
{
	var handler =
	{
		get: function(target, key)
			{
				//console.log("key: " + key.toString());
				if (typeof key == "string")
				{
					var uKey = key.toUpperCase();

					if ((key != uKey) && (key in target))
						return target[key];
					return target[uKey];
				}
				return target[key];
			},
		set: function(target, key, value)
			{
				if (typeof key == "string")
				{
					var uKey = key.toUpperCase();

					if ((key != uKey) && (key in target))
						target[key] = value;
					target[uKey] = value;
				}
				else
					target[key] = value;
			},
		deleteProperty: function(target, key)
			{
				if (typeof key == "string")
				{
					var uKey = key.toUpperCase();

					if ((key != uKey) && (key in target))
						delete target[key];
					if (uKey in target)
						delete target[uKey];
				}
				else
					delete target[key];
			},
	};
	function checkAtomic(value)
	{
		if (typeof value == "object")
			return new noCasePropObj(value); // recursive call only for Objects
		return value;
	}

	var newObj;

	if (typeof obj == "object")
	{
		newObj = new Proxy({}, handler);
        // traverse the Original object converting string keys to upper case
		for (var key in obj)
		{
			if (typeof key == "string")
			{
				var objKey = key.toUpperCase();

				if (!(key in newObj))
					newObj[objKey] = checkAtomic(obj[key]);
			}
		}
	}
	else if (Array.isArray(obj))
	{
        // in an array of objects convert to upper case string keys within each row
		newObj = new Array();
		for (var i = 0; i < obj.length; i++)
			newObj[i] = checkAtomic(obj[i]);
	}
	return newObj; // object with upper cased keys
}

// Use Sample:
var b = {Name: "Enrique", last: "Alamo", AdDrEsS: {Street: "1233 Main Street", CITY: "Somewhere", zip: 33333}};
console.log("Original: " + JSON.stringify(b));  // Original: {"Name":"Enrique","last":"Alamo","AdDrEsS":{"Street":"1233 Main Street","CITY":"Somewhere","zip":33333}}
var t = noCasePropObj(b);
console.log(JSON.stringify(t)); // {"NAME":"Enrique","LAST":"Alamo","ADDRESS":{"STREET":"1233 Main Street","CITY":"Somewhere","ZIP":33333}}
console.log('.NaMe:' + t.NaMe); // .NaMe:Enrique
console.log('["naME"]:' + t["naME"]); // ["naME"]:Enrique
console.log('.ADDreSS["CitY"]:' + t.ADDreSS["CitY"]); // .ADDreSS["CitY"]:Somewhere
console.log('check:' + JSON.stringify(Object.getOwnPropertyNames(t))); // check:["NAME","LAST","ADDRESS"]
console.log('check2:' + JSON.stringify(Object.getOwnPropertyNames(t['AddresS']))); // check2:["STREET","CITY","ZIP"]

0

There is no need for any iteration. Since prop might not be a string, it should be coerced to a string first where appropriate since that's what objects do natively. A simple getter function is:

function objGetter(prop) {
  return obj[String(prop).toLowerCase()];
}

If there is a requirement is to restring access to own properties:

function objGetter(prop) {
  prop = String(prop).toLowerCase();

  if (obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
    return obj.prop;
  }
}

and a setter:

function objSetter(prop, val) {
  obj[String(prop).toLowerCase()] = val;
}
  • 2
    This assumes all properties on the source object are lower-case. – Chris Haines Sep 18 '15 at 6:44
  • Agree with @Hainesy, this assumes case, which is contrary to what the question was getting at. – Matt Goodwin Oct 16 '15 at 17:05
  • @MattGoodwin—you seem to have missed the setter, which creates the property with a lower case name. – RobG Oct 16 '15 at 23:38
  • @RobG My issue with this answer is that given an object with indeterminately cased property names, your solution would not retrieve the value unless the properties themselves were initially created using your methods or the properties happened to be lowercase. What I believe the questioner was asking for was a way to access object properties when the case of said properties is not known ahead of time. – Matt Goodwin Oct 19 '15 at 15:23
0

Heres a very simple code to do this Assuming that data is the array of objects like

data=[{"A":"bc","B":"nn"}]

var data=data.reduce(function(prev, curr) {
    var cc = curr; // current value
    var K = Object.keys(cc); // get all keys
    var n = {};
    for (var i = 0; i < K.length; i++) {
        var key = K[i];//get hte key

        n[key.toLowerCase()] = cc[key] // convert to lowercase and assign 
    }
    prev.push(n) // push to array
    return prev;
}, [])

Output will be

data=[{"a":"bc","b":"nn"}]
0

You might only need to do case-insensitive matching (usually expensive because of object iteration) IF a case-sensitive match (cheap and quick) fails.

Say you have:

var your_object = { "Chicago" : 'hi' , "deTroiT" : 'word' , "atlanta" : 'get r dun' } ;

And you have, for whatever reason, the_value, Detroit:

if( your_object.hasOwnProperty( the_value ) ) 
  { 
    // do what you need to do here
  } 
else  
  { // since the case-sensitive match did not succeed, 
    //   ... Now try a the more-expensive case-insensitive matching

    for( let lvs_prop in your_object ) 
      { if( the_value.toLowerCase()  == lvs_prop.toLowerCase() ) 
          { 

            // do what you need to do here

            break ;
          } ;
      } 
  } ;
0

Another simple way:

function getVal(obj, prop){
var val;
  prop = (prop + "").toLowerCase();
  for(var p in obj){
     if(obj.hasOwnProperty(p) && prop == (p+ "").toLowerCase()){
           val = obj[p]
           break;
      }
   }
   return val;
}

Use it like this:

var obj = {
  foo:"bar",
  fizz:"buzz"
};
    getVal(obj,"FoO") -> returns "bar"

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