147

I want to uppercase just the first character in my string with bash.

foo="bar";

//uppercase first character

echo $foo;

should print "Bar";

13 Answers 13

129
foo="$(tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]' <<< ${foo:0:1})${foo:1}"
  • 2
    Despite being more complex than the best scored answer, this one actually does exactly that: 'uppercase first character in a variable'. Best scored answer does not have that results. Looks like simple answers are upvoted more willingly than the correct ones? – Krzysztof Jabłoński Feb 26 '16 at 15:48
  • 10
    @KrzysztofJabłoński: Actually, the "best scored answer" below will produce the same results as this answer under Bash 4. This answer has the overhead of calling a subshell (another shell), the overhead of calling the 'tr' utility (another process, not Bash), the overhead of using a here-doc/string (temporary file creation) and it uses two substitutions compared to the best scored answer's one. If you absolutely must write legacy code, consider using a function instead of a subshell. – Steve Apr 13 '16 at 23:57
  • 1
    This answer assumes the input is all lower case. This variant has no assumptions: $(tr '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]' <<< ${foo:0:1})$(tr '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]' <<< ${foo:1}) – Itai Hanski Jul 6 '16 at 7:18
  • 4
    @ItaiHanski The OP did not specify what should happen to the remaining characters, only the first. Supposed they wanted to change notQuiteCamel into NotQuiteCamel. Your variant has the side effect or forcing the remaining to lowercase - at the cost of doubling the number of sub shells and tr processes. – Jesse Chisholm Jul 27 '16 at 20:54
  • 3
    @DanieleOrlando, true, but this question has no tags other than bash. – Charles Duffy Mar 10 '17 at 3:48
281

One way with bash (version 4+):

foo=bar
echo "${foo^}"

prints:

Bar
  • 2
    Is there an opposite to this? – CMCDragonkai Dec 16 '15 at 12:06
  • 35
    @CMCDragonkai: To lowercase the first letter, use "${foo,}". To lowercase all the letters, use "${foo,,}". To uppercase all the letters, use "${foo^^}". – Steve Dec 16 '15 at 21:37
  • 1
    I accidentally noticed that ${foo~} and ${foo~~} have the same effect as ${foo^} and ${foo^^}. But I never saw that alternative mentioned anywhere. – mivk Feb 9 at 13:16
  • 4
    this doesn't seem to work on Macs. getting the following error: bad substitution – Toland Hon May 10 at 16:42
  • 1
    @TolandHon: As you've probably already worked out, you'll need to upgrade to version 4.x, or try another solution if that machine can't be upgraded for some reason. – Steve May 14 at 0:20
27

One way with sed:

echo "$(echo "$foo" | sed 's/.*/\u&/')"

Prints:

Bar
  • 9
    doesn't work on MacOS10 Lion sed, sigh, the \u expands to u instead of being an operator. – vwvan Jun 7 '14 at 1:36
  • 2
    @vwvan brew install coreutils gnu-sed and follow the instructions to use the commands without the prefix g. For what it's worth I've never wanted to run the OSX version of these commands since getting the GNU versions. – Dean Aug 26 '14 at 19:01
  • @vwvan: Yes, sorry, you will need GNU sed in this instance – Steve Aug 26 '14 at 22:40
  • 2
    @Dean: FWIW, I've never wanted to run OSX :-) – Steve Aug 26 '14 at 22:41
  • 4
    Just change it to sed 's/./\U&/ and it will work on POSIX sed. – David Conrad May 26 '17 at 15:29
21
$ foo="bar";
$ foo=`echo ${foo:0:1} | tr  '[a-z]' '[A-Z]'`${foo:1}
$ echo $foo
Bar
13

Here is the "native" text tools way:

#!/bin/bash

string="abcd"
first=`echo $string|cut -c1|tr [a-z] [A-Z]`
second=`echo $string|cut -c2-`
echo $first$second
  • finally something that works with a variable and on Mac! Thank you! – OZZIE Jan 20 '17 at 16:02
  • 3
    @DanieleOrlando, not as portable as one might hope. tr [:lower:] [:upper:] is a better choice if it needs to work in language/locales incorporating letters that aren't in the a-z or A-Z ranges. – Charles Duffy Mar 8 '17 at 18:01
8

Using awk only

foo="uNcapItalizedstrIng"
echo $foo | awk '{print toupper(substr($0,0,1))tolower(substr($0,2))}'
4

It can be done in pure bash with bash-3.2 as well:

# First, get the first character.
fl=${foo:0:1}

# Safety check: it must be a letter :).
if [[ ${fl} == [a-z] ]]; then
    # Now, obtain its octal value using printf (builtin).
    ord=$(printf '%o' "'${fl}")

    # Fun fact: [a-z] maps onto 0141..0172. [A-Z] is 0101..0132.
    # We can use decimal '- 40' to get the expected result!
    ord=$(( ord - 40 ))

    # Finally, map the new value back to a character.
    fl=$(printf '%b' '\'${ord})
fi

echo "${fl}${foo:1}"
  • how to define foo? I tried foo = $1 but I only get -bash: foo: command not found – OZZIE Jan 20 '17 at 16:01
  • 1
    @OZZIE, no spaces around the = in assignments. This is something that shellcheck.net will find for you programatically. – Charles Duffy Mar 8 '17 at 18:00
  • I always forget that about shell scripts.. only language where one space (before/after) matters... sigh (python is at least 4 if I remember correctly) – OZZIE Mar 9 '17 at 7:19
  • @OZZIE, it has to matter, because if it didn't matter, you couldn't pass = as an argument to a program (how is it supposed to know if someprogram = is running someprogram, or assigning to a variable named someprogram?) – Charles Duffy Mar 10 '17 at 3:38
1

This works too...

FooBar=baz

echo ${FooBar^^${FooBar:0:1}}

=> Baz
FooBar=baz

echo ${FooBar^^${FooBar:1:1}}

=> bAz
FooBar=baz

echo ${FooBar^^${FooBar:2:2}}

=> baZ

And so on.

Sources:

Inroductions/Tutorials:

0

This one worked for me:

Searching for all *php file in the current directory , and replace the first character of each filename to capital letter:

e.g: test.php => Test.php

for f in *php ; do mv "$f" "$(\sed 's/.*/\u&/' <<< "$f")" ; done
  • 4
    The original question was a string, and made no reference to renaming files. – AndySavage Feb 20 '17 at 18:45
0

for your situation

a='one two three'
a="${a^}"
printf '%s\n' "$a"
# One two three

for every word capitalize first letter

a='one two three'
b=( $a ) # $a without quotes
for word in "${b[@]}"; do
    c+=( "${word^}" )
done
a="${c[*]}"
printf '%s\n' "$a"
# One Two Three
  • foo='one two three'; foo=$(for i in $foo; do echo -n "${i^} "; done) Shorter resolution for every word. foo Now is "One Two Three" – vr286 Dec 16 '18 at 16:11
0

Alternative and clean solution for both Linux and OSX, it can also be used with bash variables

python -c "print(\"abc\".capitalize())"

returns Abc

-1
first-letter-to-lower () {
        str="" 
        space=" " 
        for i in $@
        do
                if [ -z $(echo $i | grep "the\|of\|with" ) ]
                then
                        str=$str"$(echo ${i:0:1} | tr  '[A-Z]' '[a-z]')${i:1}$space" 
                else
                        str=$str${i}$space 
                fi
        done
        echo $str
}
first-letter-to-upper-xc () {
        v-first-letter-to-upper | xclip -selection clipboard
}
first-letter-to-upper () {
        str="" 
        space=" " 
        for i in $@
        do
                if [ -z $(echo $i | grep "the\|of\|with" ) ]
                then
                        str=$str"$(echo ${i:0:1} | tr  '[a-z]' '[A-Z]')${i:1}$space" 
                else
                        str=$str${i}$space 
                fi
        done
        echo $str
}

first-letter-to-lower-xc(){ v-first-letter-to-lower | xclip -selection clipboard }

-7

What if the first character is not a letter (but a tab, a space, and a escaped double quote)? We'd better test it until we find a letter! So:

S='  \"ó foo bar\"'
N=0
until [[ ${S:$N:1} =~ [[:alpha:]] ]]; do N=$[$N+1]; done
#F=`echo ${S:$N:1} | tr [:lower:] [:upper:]`
#F=`echo ${S:$N:1} | sed -E -e 's/./\u&/'` #other option
F=`echo ${S:$N:1}
F=`echo ${F} #pure Bash solution to "upper"
echo "$F"${S:(($N+1))} #without garbage
echo '='${S:0:(($N))}"$F"${S:(($N+1))}'=' #garbage preserved

Foo bar
= \"Foo bar=
  • 6
    Please write cleaner code! you're lacking quotes all over the place. You're using obsolete syntax (backticks); you're using antiquated syntax ($[...]). You're using lots of useless parentheses. You're assuming that the string consists of characters from the latin alphabet (how about accentuated letters, or letters in other alphabets?). You have a great deal of work to render this snippet usable! (and since you're using regex, you might as well use the regex to find the first letter, instead of a loop). – gniourf_gniourf Mar 8 '17 at 18:05
  • 6
    I think you're wrong. It's the obligatory comment that accompanies the downvote, explaining all the wrong patterns and misconceptions of the answer. Please, learn from your mistakes (and before that, try to understand them) instead of being stubborn. Being a good fellow is also incompatible with spreading bad practices. – gniourf_gniourf Mar 9 '17 at 9:44
  • 1
    Or, if using Bash ≥4, you don't need tr: if [[ $S =~ ^([^[:alpha:]]*)([[:alpha:]].*) ]]; then out=${BASH_REMATCH[1]}${BASH_REMATCH[2]^}; else out=$S; fi; printf '%s\n' "$out" – gniourf_gniourf Mar 9 '17 at 9:51
  • 5
    This code is still badly broken. It's still using backticks instead of modern substitution syntax; it still has unmatched quotes; it still has missing quotes in places where they do in fact matter; etc. Try putting some whitespace-surrounded glob characters into your test data, if you don't believe that those missing quotes make a difference, and fix the issues shellcheck.net finds until this code comes up clean. – Charles Duffy Mar 10 '17 at 3:40
  • 2
    As for the language you quoted from unix.stackexchange.com/questions/68694/…, what you miss is that echo $foo is an example of a situation where the parser expects a list of words; so in your echo ${F}, the contents of F are string-split and glob-expanded. That's similarly true for the echo ${S:$N:1} example and all the rest. See BashPitfalls #14. – Charles Duffy Mar 10 '17 at 3:45

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