37

In SEO terms...

Is it best to put the scheme on the parent containing all the links?

<nav itemscope="itemscope" itemtype="http://www.schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
    <a href="#">Link 1</a>
    <a href="#">Link 2</a>
    <a href="#">Link 3</a>
</nav>

...or should each link be considered as it's own element?

<nav>
    <span itemscope="itemscope" itemtype="http://www.schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
        <a itemprop="url" href="#">
            <span itemprop="name">Link 1</span>
        </a>
    </span>
    <span itemscope="itemscope" itemtype="http://www.schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
        <a itemprop="url" href="#">
            <span itemprop="name">Link 2</span>
        </a>
    </span>
    <span itemscope="itemscope" itemtype="http://www.schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
        <a itemprop="url" href="#">
            <span itemprop="name">Link 3</span>
        </a>
    </span>
</nav>
22

If SiteNavigationElement is meant for the whole navigation (i.e., a navigation link list), your first example is correct.

If SiteNavigationElement is meant for a single navigation entry (i.e., a link in the navigation link list), your second example is correct.

I think Schema.org doesn’t unambiguously define which variant is meant, as they only say:

A navigation element of the page.

However, the parent type WebPageElement is defined as:

A web page element, like a table or an image

Also, all the other child types (like Table or WPFooter) seem to be used for the whole thing, and not specific parts of the thing.

So this seems to suggest that the whole navigation should be marked up, and not each single link:

<nav itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
<ul>
  <li><a href="/link-1">Link 1</a></li> <!-- don’t use the 'url' or 'name' property here! -->
  <li><a href="/link-2">Link 2</a></li>
</ul>
</nav>

In this case, all the properties belong to the whole navigation, so that means the url property would specify a URL for this navigation (and not the URLs of the links in this navigation!).

  • 3
    So According your answer this Microdata just introduce menu to serach engine...Not structure of menu! – user3307827 Mar 10 '14 at 22:42
  • @chharvey: Yes. It might make sense in non-HTML contexts or special cases, but for a typical Web page, I wouldn’t use WebPageElement and its sub-types like SiteNavigationElement. – unor Feb 14 '16 at 13:26
  • If there is a body tag with microdata: <body id="app-layout" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/WebPage"> Do i have to add itemprop to navigation? and if yes ,then what would be the value of itemprop in navigation? – alex Oct 20 '16 at 13:13
  • @alex: If you want to provide a SiteNavigationElement item, you could use the hasPart property: WebPage hasPart SiteNavigationElement. But unless you have a specific reason, I would recommend not to provide SiteNavigationElement at all. – unor Oct 20 '16 at 21:11
  • 2
    @alex: It’s usually not useful. See the link in my comment above. Or this answer, or this one. I also created an issue for Schema.org. – unor Oct 21 '16 at 14:18
12

According to Search Engine Land, it's supposed to look like this:

<ul itemscope itemtype="http://www.schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
    <li itemprop="name">
        <a itemprop="url" href="#">Link 1</a>
    </li>
    <li itemprop="name">
        <a itemprop="url" href="#">Link 2</a>
    </li>
    <li itemprop="name">
        <a itemprop="url" href="#">Travel Resources</a>
    </li>
</ul>
  • 1
    2 downvotes with no explanation of what is incorrect about this answer? – John R Perry Dec 1 '15 at 7:33
  • I didn't down vote but I did find name and url ambiguous. Does this represent what the actual value should be or simply a place holder showing the viewer where related information is supposed to appear. – Chef_Code Jun 15 '16 at 17:18
  • 1
    url identifies the URL and name identifies the name (i.e. Link 2). So no, they aren't placeholders. – John R Perry Jun 15 '16 at 23:11
  • 1
    The problem is that url and name are singleton properties of SiteNavigationElement. This markup has three of each which makes them ambiguous. Which single name and url should search engines should use? – David Harkness Sep 27 '17 at 19:01
  • 1
    This is the structure that Google Structured data tools recognizes and accepts. – IXN Oct 26 '17 at 10:54
8

First answer is correct but I'd mix both for (HTML5-)semantic:

<nav itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
    <ul>
        <li>
            <a itemprop="url" href="http://example.com/">
                <span itemprop="name">Link 1</span>
            </a>
        </li>
    </ul>
</nav>
  • 4
    Doing this results in a list of URLs and names, all in same group without any relation between a single URL and a name. I think there should be some way to indicate that each list element is a single entity which has one URL and a name. – Oiva Eskola Mar 12 '15 at 11:21
  • 1
    Generally you're right, of course. But as we are talking about a navigation I am assuming that the links all sort of belong together, don't they? – Stephan Weinhold Mar 25 '15 at 13:49
4
<nav role="navigation">

    <ul role="menubar" aria-activedescendant="">

        <li role="presentation" itemscope itemtype="https://schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
            <a href="" role="menuitem" tabindex="-1" itemprop="url">
                <span itemprop="name">Link 1</span>
            </a>
        </li>   

    </ul>

</nav>
2

schema.org/SiteNavigationElement extends WebPageElement and can be used to mark-up links, which would often make good contextual links. You can use this schema for your page menu.

<nav role="navigation" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
<ul>
    <li>
        <a href="https://yoursite.com/" title="Link to Home" itemprop="url">
            <span itemprop="name">Home</span>
        </a>
    </li>
    <li>
        <a href="https://yoursite.com/sample-page" title="Link to sample page" itemprop="url">
            <span itemprop="name">sample page</span>
        </a>
    </li>
</ul>

1

Consider the following code snippet adapted from the page source of habd.as:

<nav itemscope itemtype="https://schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
  <meta itemprop="name" content="Main Menu">
  <a itemprop="url" class="active" href="/">habd.as</a>
  <a itemprop="url" href="/code/">Code</a>
  <a itemprop="url" href="/post/">Posts</a>
  <a itemprop="url" href="/site/">Sites</a>
  <a itemprop="url" href="/talk/">Talks</a>
</nav>
<nav itemscope itemtype="https://schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
  <meta itemprop="name" content="Utility Menu">
  <a itemprop="url" href="/about/">About</a>
  <a itemprop="url" href="/contact/">Contact</a>
</nav>

When there are multiple navigations as shown above, use of SiteNavigationElement to group navigation items affords the use of name such that the grouping itself may be labeled. Labels for individual items within the groups can be obtained using the content of the links themselves.

Therefore, your first example is more correct despite assertions to the contrary.

0

I think the most elegent solution would be to use the hasPart property.

<nav itemscope="itemscope" itemtype="http://www.schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
  <a itemprop="hasPart" href="/link1.html">Link 1</a>
  <a itemprop="hasPart" href="/link2.html">Link 2</a>
  <a itemprop="hasPart" href="/link3.html">Link 3</a>
</nav>

Using Google's Structure Data Testing Tool informs that these links are part of the SiteNavigationElement and that Google should follow the links to those items:

Google's Structured Data Testing Tool's result

-1

OP's original question contained a good example of code. none of the answers do though ...

It seems everyone threw in a somewhat random answer ... You can test your schema microdata code using the following official google tool search.google.com/structured-data/testing-tool.

If you run the proposed answers in this tool you will notice that none give you the expected result: a list of SiteNavigationElement with a name & url

Some might argue that a whole menu might be considered a "navigation element" but I think it makes more sense for this denomination to designate a single navigation link. Plus if we use the SiteNavigationElement as a marker for the whole menu we have no way of associating names with URLs in the html.

To achieve this, you need to have each link be encapsulated by an itemscope property and they all need to have their own name and url itemprop (these are singleton as mentioned by @David Harkness, so they have to appear only once per itemprop)

<nav>
    <ul>
        <li  itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
            <a itemprop="url" href="http://example.com/link-1">
                <span itemprop="name">Link 1</span>
            </a>
        </li>
        <li  itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/SiteNavigationElement">
            <a itemprop="url" href="http://example.com/link-2">
                <span itemprop="name">Link 2</span>
            </a>
        </li>
    </ul>
</nav>

The code above will yeld two different navigation elements, each with a name and an URL.

Note: the itemprop="url" attribute uses the anchor's href attribute as value

  • Try that on yandex and see if you get something like this. – Josh Habdas Jan 13 at 19:52
  • I get a different result, but it still makes sense. I can't find any info as to what tools use the Yandex schema.org reader engine. I assume that the one Google provides is the obvious choice but maybe focusing on the Yandex one would make more sense for some reason? Any advice on that? – Mathieu VIALES Jan 14 at 9:53
  • My best advice would be to chose the method with the most common usage until specs are revised to be made unambiguous (or deprecated). To me it makes the most sense to name site navigations given the navigation a bodies already contain text nodes to name the nav links. I did try and look for a Baidu tool but I'm not proficient in Chinese. I feel like ARIA will play a role in all of this in the future. – Josh Habdas Jan 14 at 10:05

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