62

This question already has an answer here:

Function duplicated in R performs duplicate row search. If we want to remove the duplicates, we need just to write df[!duplicated(df),] and duplicates will be removed from data frame.

But how to find the indices of duplicated data? If duplicated returns TRUE on some row, it means, that this is the second occurence of such a row in the data frame and its index can be easily obtained. How to obtain the index of first occurence of this row? Or, in other words, an index with which the duplicated row is identical?

I could make a loop on data.frame, but I think there is a more elegant answer on this question.

marked as duplicate by David Arenburg r May 18 '17 at 14:07

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

86

This returns a logical index vector:

duplicated(df) | duplicated(df[nrow(df):1, ])[nrow(df):1]

Here's an example:

df <- data.frame(a = c(1,2,3,4,1,5,6,4,2,1))

duplicated(df) | duplicated(df[nrow(df):1, ])[nrow(df):1]
#[1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE

which(duplicated(df) | duplicated(df[nrow(df):1, ])[nrow(df):1])
#[1]  1  2  4  5  8  9 10

Update (based on comment):
The complexity of the command can be reduced if fromLast = TRUE is used as function argument. This is easier than creating two reversed vectors.

duplicated(df) | duplicated(df, fromLast = TRUE)

duplicated(df) | duplicated(df, fromLast = TRUE)
#[1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE

How it works?

The function duplicated is applied to both the original data frame and the data frame with reversed order of rows. The output of the latter is reversed again. Note that the first occurrences of duplicated values in the original data are the last occurrences in the reversed version. Afterwards, both vectors are combined using | since a TRUE in at least one of them indicates a duplicated value.

17

If you are using a keyed data.table, then you can use the following elegant syntax

library(data.table)
DT <- data.table(A = rep(1:3, each=4), 
                 B = rep(1:4, each=3), 
                 C = rep(1:2, 6), key = "A,B,C")

DT[unique(DT[duplicated(DT)]),which=T]

To unpack

  • DT[duplicated(DT)] subsets those rows which are duplicates.

  • unique(...) returns only the unique combinations of the duplicated rows. This deals with any cases with more than 1 duplicate (duplicate duplicates eg triplicates etc)

  • DT[..., which = T] merges the duplicate rows with the original, with which=T returning the row number (without which = T it would just return the data).

You could also use

 DT[,count := .N,by = list(A,B,C)][count>1, which=T]
  • in second case, no need to set a key (and by is not less efficient without key). – pommedeterresautee Oct 12 '14 at 13:00
  • 1
    I really like this approach but it seems that the results of DT[duplicated(DT)] does not include the first row that is a duplicate, for example if I have three duplicates for one instance it will only show me two of them. How to see them all? – Herman Toothrot Mar 15 '16 at 16:05

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.