23

In the Python console:

>>> a = 0
>>> if a:
...   print "L"
... 
>>> a = 1
>>> if a:
...   print "L"
... 
L
>>> a = 2
>>> if a:
...   print "L"
... 
L

Why does this happen?

3

5 Answers 5

31

In Python, bool is a subclass of int, and False has the value 0; even if values weren't implicitly cast to bool in an if statement (which they are), False == 0 is true.

1
  • 2
    0 == False is true but not completely relevant, None == False is false, but if None: is still evaluated as a falsy value (along with empty mapping etc.) Sep 29, 2017 at 12:23
15

0 is a falsy value in python

Falsy values: from (2.7) documentation:

zero of any numeric type, for example, 0, 0L, 0.0, 0j.

8

Whatever is inside an if clause implicitly has bool called on it. So,

if 1:
   ...

is really:

if bool(1):
   ...

and bool calls __nonzero__1 which says whether the object is True or False

Demo:

class foo(object):
    def __init__(self,val):
        self.val = val
    def __nonzero__(self):
        print "here"
        return bool(self.val)

a = foo(1)
bool(a)  #prints "here"
if a:    #prints "here"
    print "L"  #prints "L" since bool(1) is True.

1__bool__ on python3.x

2
  • As a side note, I believe that __nonzero__ is changed to __bool__ in py3k.
    – mgilson
    Sep 19, 2012 at 15:28
  • I see it the other way around, true corresponds to 1, and is a subclass of int
    – wonderwhy
    Aug 14, 2014 at 15:27
0

I think it just judges by 0 or not 0:

>>> if 0:
    print 'aa'

>>> if not 0:
    print 'aa'


aa
>>> 
2
  • What is this meant to show? You print the same output for both conditions and don't explain anything Sep 29, 2017 at 12:18
  • 1
    @Chris_Rands there's no print if if 0
    – Marslo
    Jul 10, 2018 at 6:18
0

First of all, everything in python is an object. Therefore, your 0 is also an object, specifically, a built-in object.

Here are the built-in objects considered as false:

  1. constants defined to be false: None and False.
  2. zero of any numeric type: 0, 0.0, 0j, Decimal(0), Fraction(0, 1)
  3. empty sequences and collections: '', (), [], {}, set(), range(0)

So when you put 0 in an if or while condition, or in a Boolean operation, it is tested for truth value.

# call the __bool__ method of 0
>>> print((0).__bool__())
False

# 
>>> if not 0:
...     print('if not 0 is evaluated as True')
'if not 0 is evaluated as True'

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