67

Using a bash only script, how can you provide a bash progress indicator?

For example, when I run a command from bash - while that command is executing - let the user know that something is still happening.

4

12 Answers 12

86

In this example using SCP, I'm demonstrating how to grab the process id (pid) and then do something while that process is running.

This displays a simple spinnng icon.

/usr/bin/scp me@website.com:file somewhere 2>/dev/null &
pid=$! # Process Id of the previous running command

spin[0]="-"
spin[1]="\\"
spin[2]="|"
spin[3]="/"

echo -n "[copying] ${spin[0]}"
while [ kill -0 $pid ]
do
  for i in "${spin[@]}"
  do
        echo -ne "\b$i"
        sleep 0.1
  done
done

William Pursell's solution

/usr/bin/scp me@website.com:file somewhere 2>/dev/null &
pid=$! # Process Id of the previous running command

spin='-\|/'

i=0
while kill -0 $pid 2>/dev/null
do
  i=$(( (i+1) %4 ))
  printf "\r${spin:$i:1}"
  sleep .1
done
11
  • 1
    +1 This is really good: A third of the LOC other solutions use. Sep 19 '12 at 15:52
  • 3
    You need to run scp in the background, or it completes before the rest of this script runs. (Backgrounding is also required for $! to have any meaning).
    – chepner
    Sep 19 '12 at 16:03
  • 7
    It's much simpler to do: s='-\|/'; i=0; while kill -0 $pid; do i=$(( (i+1) %4 )); printf "\r${s:$i:1}"; sleep .1; done Sep 19 '12 at 16:04
  • @chepner Good point, I just missed off the &. @WilliamPursell Yes, though not sure how clear that is!
    – Pez Cuckow
    Sep 19 '12 at 16:06
  • 3
    while [ kill -0 $pid ] causes line 102: [: -0: binary operator expected error for me. I have to use while kill -0 $pid; instead! Aug 22 '15 at 12:34
27

If you have a way to estimate percentage done, such as the current number of files processed and total number, you can make a simple linear progress meter with a little math and assumptions about screen width.

count=0
total=34
pstr="[=======================================================================]"

while [ $count -lt $total ]; do
  sleep 0.5 # this is work
  count=$(( $count + 1 ))
  pd=$(( $count * 73 / $total ))
  printf "\r%3d.%1d%% %.${pd}s" $(( $count * 100 / $total )) $(( ($count * 1000 / $total) % 10 )) $pstr
done

Or instead of a linear meter you could estimate time remaining. It's about as accurate as other similar things.

count=0
total=34
start=`date +%s`

while [ $count -lt $total ]; do
  sleep 0.5 # this is work
  cur=`date +%s`
  count=$(( $count + 1 ))
  pd=$(( $count * 73 / $total ))
  runtime=$(( $cur-$start ))
  estremain=$(( ($runtime * $total / $count)-$runtime ))
  printf "\r%d.%d%% complete ($count of $total) - est %d:%0.2d remaining\e[K" $(( $count*100/$total )) $(( ($count*1000/$total)%10)) $(( $estremain/60 )) $(( $estremain%60 ))
done
printf "\ndone\n"
4
  • 1
    How can I estimate the files that are still to copy? You mean take a count of the current files at the start and then every loop count how many are on the remote system? (genuinely interested rather than saying you're wrong)
    – Pez Cuckow
    Sep 20 '12 at 10:57
  • It depends completely on your task. For instance, if you're using scp to copy a bunch of files, you could call it separately for each file rather than using *. Or as you suggest you could check on the remote system for the number of files or file sizes, although that could be fairly expensive to do.
    – evil otto
    Sep 20 '12 at 17:24
  • @evil otto. Thank you very much. Kindly where in the previous code we should call the command that we need to watch it is progress?
    – goro
    Aug 24 '15 at 15:36
  • @goro - in my example the command that is doing work is "sleep 0.5", so that would be your scp command.
    – evil otto
    Aug 24 '15 at 21:10
25

Referred from here is a nice spinner function (with slight modification), will help your cursor to stay in original position also.

spinner()
{
    local pid=$!
    local delay=0.75
    local spinstr='|/-\'
    while [ "$(ps a | awk '{print $1}' | grep $pid)" ]; do
        local temp=${spinstr#?}
        printf " [%c]  " "$spinstr"
        local spinstr=$temp${spinstr%"$temp"}
        sleep $delay
        printf "\b\b\b\b\b\b"
    done
    printf "    \b\b\b\b"
}

with usage:

(a_long_running_task) &
spinner
6
  • 1
    How would one be able to add a custom message after the "spinner"?
    – Jonathan
    Sep 2 '16 at 20:41
  • @xcy7e웃 : I extended this in answer stackoverflow.com/a/50699733/1184842
    – jan
    Jun 5 '18 at 12:08
  • 1
    @xcy7e what if you want to get a string output from the a_long_running_task, how would you handle that use-case?
    – qodeninja
    Sep 26 '19 at 22:24
  • @qodeninja I recommend you open a new thread with your question as this one has been closed.
    – Jonathan
    Sep 27 '19 at 1:21
  • @xcy7e yeah no. I'm already traumatized with adding questions to this site. and this slight clarifitation doesnt warrant a new question.
    – qodeninja
    Sep 27 '19 at 19:32
18

This is a pretty easy technique:
(just replace sleep 20 with whatever command you want to indicate is running)

#!/bin/bash

sleep 20 & PID=$! #simulate a long process

echo "THIS MAY TAKE A WHILE, PLEASE BE PATIENT WHILE ______ IS RUNNING..."
printf "["
# While process is running...
while kill -0 $PID 2> /dev/null; do 
    printf  "▓"
    sleep 1
done
printf "] done!"

The output looks like this:

> THIS MAY TAKE A WHILE, PLEASE BE PATIENT WHILE ______ IS RUNNING...
> [▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓▓] done!

It adds a (high density dotted) every second until the process is complete.

2
  • 1
    how do you use this within a function?
    – qodeninja
    Feb 16 '18 at 19:45
  • 4
    You could start the process, get the PID, then pass it into a function that contains the code between the echo and the done!
    – cosbor11
    Feb 17 '18 at 19:04
8

Here a simple one-liner, that I use:

while true; do for X in '-' '/' '|' '\'; do echo -en "\b$X"; sleep 0.1; done; done 
1
  • 1
    Example usage: echo doing something that takes ten seconds...; sleep 10 & while [ "$(ps a | awk '{print $1}' | grep $!)" ] ; do for X in '-' '/' '|' '\'; do echo -en "\b$X"; sleep 0.1; done; done
    – fipsbox
    Dec 22 '15 at 13:36
7

Aside from the classical spinner, you can use this progress bar

It achieves subcharacter precision by using half block characters

enter image description here

Code included on the link.

6

Here's my attempt. I'm new to bash scripts so some of this code may be terrible :)

Example Output:

In Progress Done

The Code:

progressBarWidth=20

# Function to draw progress bar
progressBar () {

  # Calculate number of fill/empty slots in the bar
  progress=$(echo "$progressBarWidth/$taskCount*$tasksDone" | bc -l)  
  fill=$(printf "%.0f\n" $progress)
  if [ $fill -gt $progressBarWidth ]; then
    fill=$progressBarWidth
  fi
  empty=$(($fill-$progressBarWidth))

  # Percentage Calculation
  percent=$(echo "100/$taskCount*$tasksDone" | bc -l)
  percent=$(printf "%0.2f\n" $percent)
  if [ $(echo "$percent>100" | bc) -gt 0 ]; then
    percent="100.00"
  fi

  # Output to screen
  printf "\r["
  printf "%${fill}s" '' | tr ' ' ▉
  printf "%${empty}s" '' | tr ' ' ░
  printf "] $percent%% - $text "
}



## Collect task count
taskCount=33
tasksDone=0

while [ $tasksDone -le $taskCount ]; do

  # Do your task
  (( tasksDone += 1 ))

  # Add some friendly output
  text=$(echo "somefile-$tasksDone.dat")

  # Draw the progress bar
  progressBar $taskCount $taskDone $text

  sleep 0.01
done

echo

You can see the source here: https://gist.github.com/F1LT3R/fa7f102b08a514f2c535

5

Here is an example of an 'activity indicator,' for an internet connection speed test via the linux 'speedtest-cli' command:

printf '\n\tInternet speed test:  '

# http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12498304/using-bash-to-display-a-progress-working-indicator

spin[0]="-"
spin[1]="\\"
spin[2]="|"
spin[3]="/"

# http://stackoverflow.com/questions/20165057/executing-bash-loop-while-command-is-running

speedtest > .st.txt &           ## & : continue running script
pid=$!                          ## PID of last command

# If this script is killed, kill 'speedtest':
trap "kill $pid 2> /dev/null" EXIT

# While 'speedtest' is running:
while kill -0 $pid 2> /dev/null; do
for i in "${spin[@]}"
do
    echo -ne "\b$i"
    sleep 0.1
done
done

# Disable the trap on a normal exit:
trap - EXIT

printf "\n\t           "
grep Download: .st.txt
printf "\t             "
grep Upload: .st.txt
echo ''
rm -f st.txt

Update - example:

animated GIF

2

https://github.com/extensionsapp/progre.sh

Create 82 percent progress: progreSh 82

enter image description here

1

I extended the answer of checksum in his answer by displaying a variable info message after the spinner:

#!/usr/bin/env bash 
function spinner() {
    local info="$1"
    local pid=$!
    local delay=0.75
    local spinstr='|/-\'
    while kill -0 $pid 2> /dev/null; do
        local temp=${spinstr#?}
        printf " [%c]  $info" "$spinstr"
        local spinstr=$temp${spinstr%"$temp"}
        sleep $delay
        local reset="\b\b\b\b\b\b"
        for ((i=1; i<=$(echo $info | wc -c); i++)); do
            reset+="\b"
        done
        printf $reset
    done
    printf "    \b\b\b\b"
}

# usage:
(a_long_running_task) &
spinner "performing long running task..."

I don't like that if the stdout output with a spinner is redirected to a file, less shows ^H for each backspace instead of avoiding them in a file output at all. Is that possible with an easy spinner like this one?

0

@DavidD's comments on Pez Cuckows answer, this is an example of how you can capture the output of the progress bar in a script and still see the spinner on the screen:

#!/usr/bin/env bash 

#############################################################################
###########################################################################
###
### Modified/Rewritten by A.M.Danischewski (c) 2015 v1.1
### Issues: If you find any issues emai1 me at my <first name> dot 
###         <my last name> at gmail dot com.  
###
### Based on scripts posted by Pez Cuckow, William Pursell at:  
### http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12498304/using-bash-to-display-\
###      a-progress-working-indicator
###
### This program runs a program passed in and outputs a timing of the 
### command and it exec's a new fd for stdout so you can assign a 
### variable the output of what was being run. 
### 
### This is a very new rough draft but could be expanded. 
### 
### This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
### it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
### the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
### (at your option) any later version.
###
### This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
### but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
### MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
### GNU General Public License for more details.
###
### You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
### along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.
###########################################################################
#############################################################################

declare    CMD="${1}"
shift      ## Clip the first value of the $@, the rest are the options. 
declare    CMD_OPTIONS="$@"
declare    CMD_OUTPUT=""
declare    TMP_OUTPUT="/tmp/_${0##*/}_$$_$(date +%Y%m%d%H%M%S%N)" 
declare -r SPIN_DELAY="0.1"
declare -i PID=

function usage() {
cat <<EOF

Description: ${0##*/}

This program runs a program passed in and outputs a timing of the 
command and it exec's a new fd for stdout so you can assign a variable 
the output of what was being run. 

Usage: ${0##*/} <command> [command options]

 E.g.  
    >$ ${0##*/} sleep 5 \&\& echo "hello" \| figlet
     Running: sleep 5 && echo hello | figlet, PID 2587:/

     real   0m5.003s
     user   0m0.000s
     sys    0m0.002s
      _          _ _       
     | |__   ___| | | ___  
     | '_ \ / _ \ | |/ _ \ 
     | | | |  __/ | | (_) |
     |_| |_|\___|_|_|\___/ 

     Done..
    >$ var=\$(${0##*/} sleep 5 \&\& echo hi)
     Running: sleep 5 && echo hi, PID 32229:-
     real   0m5.003s
     user   0m0.000s
     sys    0m0.001s
     Done..
     >$ echo \$var
     hi

EOF
} 

function spin_wait() { 
 local -a spin 
 spin[0]="-"
 spin[1]="\\"
 spin[2]="|"
 spin[3]="/"
 echo -en "Running: ${CMD} ${CMD_OPTIONS}, PID ${PID}: " >&3
 while kill -0 ${PID} 2>/dev/random; do
   for i in "${spin[@]}"; do
     echo -ne "\b$i" >&3
     sleep ${SPIN_DELAY}
   done
 done
} 

function run_cmd() { 
 exec 3>$(tty)
 eval "time ${CMD} ${CMD_OPTIONS}" 2>>"${TMP_OUTPUT}" | tee "${TMP_OUTPUT}" & 
 PID=$! # Set global PID to process id of the command we just ran. 
 spin_wait
 echo -en "\n$(< "${TMP_OUTPUT}")\n" >&3 
 echo -en "Done..\n" >&3
 rm "${TMP_OUTPUT}"
 exec 3>&-
} 

if [[ -z "${CMD}" || "${CMD}" =~ ^-. ]]; then 
 usage | more && exit 0 
else 
 run_cmd  
fi 

exit 0 
0

Psychedelic progress bar for bash scripting. Call by command line as './progressbar x y' where 'x' is a time in seconds and 'y' is a message to display. The inner function progressbar() works standalone as well and takes 'x' as a percentage and 'y' as a message.

#!/bin/bash

if [ "$#" -eq 0 ]; then echo "x is \"time in seconds\" and z is \"message\""; echo "Usage: progressbar x z"; exit; fi
progressbar() {
        local loca=$1; local loca2=$2;
        declare -a bgcolors; declare -a fgcolors;
        for i in {40..46} {100..106}; do
                bgcolors+=("$i")
        done
        for i in {30..36} {90..96}; do
                fgcolors+=("$i")
        done
        local u=$(( 50 - loca ));
        local y; local t;
        local z; z=$(printf '%*s' "$u");
        local w=$(( loca * 2 ));
        local bouncer=".oO°Oo.";
        for ((i=0;i<loca;i++)); do
                t="${bouncer:((i%${#bouncer})):1}"
                bgcolor="\\E[${bgcolors[RANDOM % 14]}m \\033[m"
                y+="$bgcolor";
        done
        fgcolor="\\E[${fgcolors[RANDOM % 14]}m"
        echo -ne " $fgcolor$t$y$z$fgcolor$t \\E[96m(\\E[36m$w%\\E[96m)\\E[92m $fgcolor$loca2\\033[m\r"
};
timeprogress() {
        local loca="$1"; local loca2="$2";
        loca=$(bc -l <<< scale=2\;"$loca/50")
        for i in {1..50}; do
                progressbar "$i" "$loca2";
                sleep "$loca";
        done
        echo -e "\n"
};
timeprogress "$1" "$2"
3
  • Please don't hard-code terminal-specific control codes - make friends with tput instead. May 19 '16 at 21:28
  • I redid the script using tput as you suggest. The speed was terribly reduced. Not a good suggestion.
    – nexace
    May 22 '16 at 17:23
  • Sorry, I still see control codes, and no tput usage. I'd be very surprised if it was noticeably slower to call it a handful of times (to initialise suitable variables), but it would possibly be noticeable if one were to invoke it anew every time the control code were needed. May 29 '16 at 23:02

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