20

In my Ruby on Rails Project I use HAML, I need to translate something like this

<div>foo <a>bar</a>.<div>

into HAML. It should look like:

.divclass
  foo
  %a bar
  .     

The period at start is not working because its used by HAML. So how can I use a period as content?

Even with building a span around its not working, again the period is taken as something special.

I think there is an escape mechanism but I can't find it.

  • 4
    In HAML, as with most other languages, things are escaped with a backslash. It should be the first thing you try when moving to a new language. – meagar Sep 20 '12 at 12:57
  • thanks, exactly what I was looking for. – Calmon Sep 20 '12 at 12:59
  • HAML is also well documented: haml.info/docs/yardoc/file.HAML_REFERENCE.html – mwolfetech Sep 20 '12 at 12:59
33

It is escaped with \

like this

\.

See Escaping \ in the HAML reference.

Update: Using HAML's succeed (as in this answer) is a better solution if you need a dot in the end of the sentence (to prevent unnecessary white space).

  • 1
    The problem here is that in his case there will be a white space between the a tag and the dot. Prefer the succeed method from @Jay – Jeremy F. Jun 5 '15 at 14:17
  • Jeremy F. Yes you are right. – khustochka Sep 22 '17 at 15:49
18

A better method:

%p
  This sentence ends with a link which is *just* before a period
  = succeed "." do
    %a{:href => "#"} link
  But the period wasn't included with the link and there was no space before the period.
  • 1
    An explanation of what makes this method better would be good. – Wayne Conrad Aug 2 '18 at 21:10
2

You also have access to the :plain filter, like this:

%p 
  :plain
    .
1

I'm going to add another option using Rails' built-in link_to helper instead of manually creating the link. Then you can simply do

%p
  This sentence ends with a link which is *just* before a period
  #{ link_to "link", "#" }.

Different solutions will work in different places, but I find this to be quite clean, especially if already using link_to or mail_to etc.

  • This is definitely the way. Since we're clearly need interpolation here from the generic point of view. – jibiel May 15 '18 at 9:42

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