1

I have a template base class.Lets say.

template<class KeyF>
class Base 
{
  private:
   int member1;
   char member2;
   ....
};

I derived another class from above class.

template<class KeyF>
class Derived : public Base<KeyF>
{
  public:
  void func1() {
    <accessing member1/member2>
  }

  ....
};

Above code doesn't compile in gcc. saying that member1 is not a member of Derived. But it is already derived from a Base Class, then why can't it access its member?

  • 2
    member1 and member2 should be declared as protected or better you should provide protected getters/setters for them. – xaizek Sep 20 '12 at 14:22
  • 2
    xaizek is correct, but also see this question - you need to qualify those accesses with this->. – DCoder Sep 20 '12 at 14:25
3

Members in Base are private. You cannot access private members of class, outside of this class (except friend). Make them protected, or make protected getters.

  • Thanx. It worked. How could I forget it :) – Dharmendra Sep 20 '12 at 14:30
  • Public getters is a poor suggestion, as it breaks encapsulation. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 20 '12 at 14:57
  • @DavidRodríguez-dribeas getters breaks encapsulation? i don't say setters, i say getters. – ForEveR Sep 20 '12 at 15:06
  • 1
    @ForEveR: Yes, they do. They leak to all other code the implementation details of your type. To help in the argument, I must say that I commonly use two terms: property and getter to mean different things. A 'property' is a feature of the object in the domain, while a 'getter' is a function provide access to the internals (i.e. 'size()' in a vector is a property of the type, which might or not be retrieving a member). Properties don't break encapsulation, as they are features of the object, but getters (not properties, but functions that return internals) break encapsulation. [...] – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 20 '12 at 16:02
  • 1
    [...] If the member is protected, then it is a detail of the internal interface between the base and derived types, not a public property in the domain. Making it public increases coupling for the rest of the code. You are leaking details of your implementation to all other code. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 20 '12 at 16:03
1

Did you try protected? Been a bit since I was deep into C++...

  • Thanx to All. It worked. I forgot to use Protected :) – Dharmendra Sep 20 '12 at 14:31
1

You need to prefix base member names with this-> or Base<KeyF>::, or add a using declaration to the class to unhide them. Their names are dependent names, and they are hidden.

  • They're also private, which makes them unreachable in the derived class. – DCoder Sep 20 '12 at 14:28
  • @DCoder: That's a separate problem, though... with a separate error message?! – Kerrek SB Sep 20 '12 at 14:38

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