344

How can I print version number for the current Python installation in the output?

435

Try

import sys
print(sys.version)

This prints the full version information string. If you only want the python version number, then Bastien Léonard's solution is the best. You might want to examine the full string and see if you need it or portions of it.

145
import platform
print(platform.python_version())
45

Try

python --version 

or

python -V

This will return a current python version in terminal.

  • 2
    Nice and simple! I would recommend the latter method because older version of Python do not support the "--version" flag. Plus, the less typing for me, the better. – Steve Gelman Nov 14 '14 at 14:33
  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer! – Frode Akselsen Sep 18 '17 at 22:28
  • 10
    No it should not be the answer, because Thomas specifically asked "...in the output?". He wasn't asking how to discover which version he had installed, he was asking how to include that information into a 'print' statement. – Crossfit_and_Beer Dec 5 '17 at 14:33
  • Note that python -v (lower-case) results in verbose output, which isn't what you want. – Roger Lipscombe Dec 13 '17 at 11:56
43
import platform
print(platform.python_version())

or

import sys
print("The Python version is %s.%s.%s" % sys.version_info[:3])

Edit: I had totally missed the platform.python_version() method.

25
import sys  

expanded version

sys.version_info  
sys.version_info(major=3, minor=2, micro=2, releaselevel='final', serial=0)

specific

maj_ver = sys.version_info.major  
repr(maj_ver) 
'3'  

or

print(sys.version_info.major)
'3'

or

version = ".".join(map(str, sys.version_info[:3]))
print(version)
'3.2.2'
-5
import sys
print sys.version

This is a version of the answer Thomas Owens gave, which is compatible with python 2.7.12. Many people are still learning python via the earlier versions as is recommended in the book Learn Python the Hard Way. Python 2.7.12 is particularly finicky as to what it will accept in order to print out the desired result in terminal. This is the only way I currently know of to achieve the desired output with this version.

  • 1
    What information does this add over the existing answers? More specifically, print(sys.version) still works in Python2 – cricket_007 Aug 18 '18 at 21:25
  • It is a python 2.7.12 specific answer which will give users of said version headaches when they try to learn from sites like sebastianraschka.com/Articles/2014_python_2_3_key_diff.html# – derek brown Aug 18 '18 at 21:30
  • I just opened a 2.7.12 interpreter and the other answers including print(sys.version) work absolutely fine, probably fine in 2.7.10 and higher too... Besides that, LPTHW has been updated for Python3, which should be used now for learning, and in some circles is actually discouraged for general learning purposes – cricket_007 Aug 18 '18 at 21:33
  • Additionally, the print syntax error resolution is just a search away – cricket_007 Aug 18 '18 at 21:36
  • 1
    Personally I prefer to set everything to vars explicitly and I never just print anything with print always set to a variable so you can debug again python is versitile so your wrong derek is not wrong and wrapping print() in python 2 can cause some issues in the way its printed as in you cant abridge two strings while wrapped () because it will print as a list if im not mistaken so being mindful of that is important. However, using () with printcan make your scriots portable to python 2 and 3. – Grant Zukel Aug 18 '18 at 22:09

protected by cricket_007 Aug 18 '18 at 21:28

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