118

What is a way to simply wait for all threaded process to finish? For example, let's say I have:

public class DoSomethingInAThread implements Runnable{

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int n=0; n<1000; n++) {
            Thread t = new Thread(new DoSomethingInAThread());
            t.start();
        }
        // wait for all threads' run() methods to complete before continuing
    }

    public void run() {
        // do something here
    }


}

How do I alter this so the main() method pauses at the comment until all threads' run() methods exit? Thanks!

0

14 Answers 14

164

You put all threads in an array, start them all, and then have a loop

for(i = 0; i < threads.length; i++)
  threads[i].join();

Each join will block until the respective thread has completed. Threads may complete in a different order than you joining them, but that's not a problem: when the loop exits, all threads are completed.

9
  • 1
    @Mykola: what exactly is the advantage of using a thread group? Just because the API is there doesn't mean you have to use it... Commented Aug 9, 2009 at 20:35
  • 2
    See: "A thread group represents a set of threads." This is semantic correct for this use-case! And: "A thread is allowed to access information about its own thread group"
    – Martin K.
    Commented Aug 9, 2009 at 20:40
  • 5
    The book “Effective Java” recommends avoiding thread groups (item 73). Commented Aug 9, 2009 at 20:47
  • 2
    The bugs mentioned in Effective Java should have been fixed in Java 6. If newer java versions aren't a restriction, it's better to use Futures to solve thread problems. Martin v. Löwis: You're right. It's not relecant for that problem, but it's nice to get more Information about the running threads from one Object (like the ExecutorService). I think it's nice to use given features to solve a problem; maybe you'll need more flexibility (thread information) in the future. It's also right to mention the old buggy classes in older JDKs.
    – Martin K.
    Commented Aug 9, 2009 at 20:59
  • 6
    ThreadGroup does not implement a group-level join, so why people are pushing ThreadGroup is a little baffling. Are people really using spin locks & querying the group's activeCount? You'd be hard-pressed to convince me that doing so it better in any way when compared to just calling join on all of the threads.
    – carej
    Commented Aug 10, 2009 at 6:05
44

One way would be to make a List of Threads, create and launch each thread, while adding it to the list. Once everything is launched, loop back through the list and call join() on each one. It doesn't matter what order the threads finish executing in, all you need to know is that by the time that second loop finishes executing, every thread will have completed.

A better approach is to use an ExecutorService and its associated methods:

List<Callable> callables = ... // assemble list of Callables here
                               // Like Runnable but can return a value
ExecutorService execSvc = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();
List<Future<?>> results = execSvc.invokeAll(callables);
// Note: You may not care about the return values, in which case don't
//       bother saving them

Using an ExecutorService (and all of the new stuff from Java 5's concurrency utilities) is incredibly flexible, and the above example barely even scratches the surface.

3
  • ThreadGroup is the way to go! With a mutable List you'll get in trouble (synchronisation)
    – Martin K.
    Commented Aug 9, 2009 at 20:35
  • 3
    What? How would you get in trouble? It's only mutable (only readble) by the thread that is doing the launching, so as long as it doesn't modify the list while iterating through it, it's fine. Commented Aug 9, 2009 at 20:38
  • It depends on how you use it. If you'll use the calling class in a thread you'll have problems.
    – Martin K.
    Commented Aug 9, 2009 at 20:43
29
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.Executors;
import java.util.concurrent.Future;

public class DoSomethingInAThread implements Runnable
{
   public static void main(String[] args) throws ExecutionException, InterruptedException
   {
      //limit the number of actual threads
      int poolSize = 10;
      ExecutorService service = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(poolSize);
      List<Future<Runnable>> futures = new ArrayList<Future<Runnable>>();

      for (int n = 0; n < 1000; n++)
      {
         Future f = service.submit(new DoSomethingInAThread());
         futures.add(f);
      }

      // wait for all tasks to complete before continuing
      for (Future<Runnable> f : futures)
      {
         f.get();
      }

      //shut down the executor service so that this thread can exit
      service.shutdownNow();
   }

   public void run()
   {
      // do something here
   }
}
2
  • worked like a charm... i have two sets of threads which should not run simultaneously because of issues on multiple cookies. I used your example to run one set of threads at a time.. thanks for sharing your knowledge...
    – arn-arn
    Commented Apr 8, 2016 at 15:31
  • @Dantalian - In your Runnable class (likely in the run method), you would want to capture any exceptions that occurred and store them locally (or store an error message/condition). In the example, f.get() returns your object that you submitted to the ExecutorService. Your object could have a method for retrieving any exceptions/error conditions. Depending on how you modify the provided example, you might need to cast the object turned by f.get() to your expected type.
    – jt.
    Commented Jun 29, 2016 at 4:41
14

instead of join(), which is an old API, you can use CountDownLatch. I have modified your code as below to fulfil your requirement.

import java.util.concurrent.*;
class DoSomethingInAThread implements Runnable{
    CountDownLatch latch;
    public DoSomethingInAThread(CountDownLatch latch){
        this.latch = latch;
    } 
    public void run() {
        try{
            System.out.println("Do some thing");
            latch.countDown();
        }catch(Exception err){
            err.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

public class CountDownLatchDemo {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try{
            CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(1000);
            for (int n=0; n<1000; n++) {
                Thread t = new Thread(new DoSomethingInAThread(latch));
                t.start();
            }
            latch.await();
            System.out.println("In Main thread after completion of 1000 threads");
        }catch(Exception err){
            err.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

Explanation:

  1. CountDownLatch has been initialized with given count 1000 as per your requirement.

  2. Each worker thread DoSomethingInAThread will decrement the CountDownLatch, which has been passed in constructor.

  3. Main thread CountDownLatchDemo await() till the count has become zero. Once the count has become zero, you will get below line in output.

    In Main thread after completion of 1000 threads
    

More info from oracle documentation page

public void await()
           throws InterruptedException

Causes the current thread to wait until the latch has counted down to zero, unless the thread is interrupted.

Refer to related SE question for other options:

wait until all threads finish their work in java

8

Avoid the Thread class altogether and instead use the higher abstractions provided in java.util.concurrent

The ExecutorService class provides the method invokeAll that seems to do just what you want.

6

Depending on your needs, you may also want to check out the classes CountDownLatch and CyclicBarrier in the java.util.concurrent package. They can be useful if you want your threads to wait for each other, or if you want more fine-grained control over the way your threads execute (e.g., waiting in their internal execution for another thread to set some state). You could also use a CountDownLatch to signal all of your threads to start at the same time, instead of starting them one by one as you iterate through your loop. The standard API docs have an example of this, plus using another CountDownLatch to wait for all threads to complete their execution.

6

Consider using java.util.concurrent.CountDownLatch. Examples in javadocs

3
  • Is a latch for threads, the latch lock works with a countdown. In the run() method of your thread explicitly declare to wait for a CountDownLatch to reach it's countdown to 0. You can use the same CountDownLatch in more than one thread to release them simultaneously. I don't know if it is what you need, just wanted to mention it because it's useful when working in a multithread environment. Commented Nov 17, 2014 at 12:52
  • Maybe you should put that explanation in the body of your answer?
    – Aaron Hall
    Commented Nov 17, 2014 at 14:38
  • The examples in the Javadoc are very descriptive, that's why I didn't add any. docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/…. In the first example, all the Workers threads are releases simultaneously because they wait for the CountdownLatch startSignal to reach zero, which happens in startSignal.countDown(). Then, the mian thread waits until all the workes finish using the instruction doneSignal.await(). doneSignal decrease its value in each worker. Commented Nov 17, 2014 at 19:22
5

As Martin K suggested java.util.concurrent.CountDownLatch seems to be a better solution for this. Just adding an example for the same

     public class CountDownLatchDemo
{

    public static void main (String[] args)
    {
        int noOfThreads = 5;
        // Declare the count down latch based on the number of threads you need
        // to wait on
        final CountDownLatch executionCompleted = new CountDownLatch(noOfThreads);
        for (int i = 0; i < noOfThreads; i++)
        {
            new Thread()
            {

                @Override
                public void run ()
                {

                    System.out.println("I am executed by :" + Thread.currentThread().getName());
                    try
                    {
                        // Dummy sleep
                        Thread.sleep(3000);
                        // One thread has completed its job
                        executionCompleted.countDown();
                    }
                    catch (InterruptedException e)
                    {
                        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                        e.printStackTrace();
                    }
                }

            }.start();
        }

        try
        {
            // Wait till the count down latch opens.In the given case till five
            // times countDown method is invoked
            executionCompleted.await();
            System.out.println("All over");
        }
        catch (InterruptedException e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}
3

If you make a list of the threads, you can loop through them and .join() against each, and your loop will finish when all the threads have. I haven't tried it though.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/lang/Thread.html#join()

1
1

Create the thread object inside the first for loop.

for (int i = 0; i < threads.length; i++) {
     threads[i] = new Thread(new Runnable() {
         public void run() {
             // some code to run in parallel
         }
     });
     threads[i].start();
 }

And then so what everyone here is saying.

for(i = 0; i < threads.length; i++)
  threads[i].join();
0

You can do it with the Object "ThreadGroup" and its parameter activeCount:

2
  • Not sure how you exactly propose to do it. If you propose to poll activeCount in a loop: that's bad, since it's busy-wait (even if you sleep between polls - you then get a tradeoff between business and responsiveness). Commented Aug 9, 2009 at 20:33
  • @Martin v. Löwis: "Join will wait for just a single thread. A better solution might be a java.util.concurrent.CountDownLatch. Simply initialize the latch with the count set to the number of worker threads. Each worker thread should call countDown() just before it exits, and the main thread simply calls await(), which will block until the counter reaches zero. The problem with join() is also that you can't start adding more threads dynamically. The list will explode with a Concurrent Modification." Your solution works fine for the Problem but not for general purpose.
    – Martin K.
    Commented Aug 9, 2009 at 21:12
0

As an alternative to CountDownLatch you can also use CyclicBarrier e.g.

public class ThreadWaitEx {
    static CyclicBarrier barrier = new CyclicBarrier(100, new Runnable(){
        public void run(){
            System.out.println("clean up job after all tasks are done.");
        }
    });
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
            Thread t = new Thread(new MyCallable(barrier));
            t.start();
        }       
    }

}    

class MyCallable implements Runnable{
    private CyclicBarrier b = null;
    public MyCallable(CyclicBarrier b){
        this.b = b;
    }
    @Override
    public void run(){
        try {
            //do something
            System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName()+" is waiting for barrier after completing his job.");
            b.await();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (BrokenBarrierException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }       
}

To use CyclicBarrier in this case barrier.await() should be the last statement i.e. when your thread is done with its job. CyclicBarrier can be used again with its reset() method. To quote javadocs:

A CyclicBarrier supports an optional Runnable command that is run once per barrier point, after the last thread in the party arrives, but before any threads are released. This barrier action is useful for updating shared-state before any of the parties continue.

3
  • I don't think that is is a good example for CyclicBarrier. Why do you use a Thread.sleep() call?
    – Guenther
    Commented Sep 16, 2016 at 16:44
  • @Guenther - yes, I changed the code to suite the requirement. Commented Sep 17, 2016 at 4:34
  • CyclicBarrier is not an alternative to CountDownLatch. When threads must repeatedly count down you should create a CyclicBarrier, otherwise default to CountDownLatch (unless otherwise requiring additional abstraction of Execution, at which point you should look to the higher-level, Services). Commented May 11, 2017 at 1:19
0

The join() was not helpful to me. see this sample in Kotlin:

    val timeInMillis = System.currentTimeMillis()
    ThreadUtils.startNewThread(Runnable {
        for (i in 1..5) {
            val t = Thread(Runnable {
                Thread.sleep(50)
                var a = i
                kotlin.io.println(Thread.currentThread().name + "|" + "a=$a")
                Thread.sleep(200)
                for (j in 1..5) {
                    a *= j
                    Thread.sleep(100)
                    kotlin.io.println(Thread.currentThread().name + "|" + "$a*$j=$a")
                }
                kotlin.io.println(Thread.currentThread().name + "|TaskDurationInMillis = " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - timeInMillis))
            })
            t.start()
        }
    })

The result:

Thread-5|a=5
Thread-1|a=1
Thread-3|a=3
Thread-2|a=2
Thread-4|a=4
Thread-2|2*1=2
Thread-3|3*1=3
Thread-1|1*1=1
Thread-5|5*1=5
Thread-4|4*1=4
Thread-1|2*2=2
Thread-5|10*2=10
Thread-3|6*2=6
Thread-4|8*2=8
Thread-2|4*2=4
Thread-3|18*3=18
Thread-1|6*3=6
Thread-5|30*3=30
Thread-2|12*3=12
Thread-4|24*3=24
Thread-4|96*4=96
Thread-2|48*4=48
Thread-5|120*4=120
Thread-1|24*4=24
Thread-3|72*4=72
Thread-5|600*5=600
Thread-4|480*5=480
Thread-3|360*5=360
Thread-1|120*5=120
Thread-2|240*5=240
Thread-1|TaskDurationInMillis = 765
Thread-3|TaskDurationInMillis = 765
Thread-4|TaskDurationInMillis = 765
Thread-5|TaskDurationInMillis = 765
Thread-2|TaskDurationInMillis = 765

Now let me use the join() for threads:

    val timeInMillis = System.currentTimeMillis()
    ThreadUtils.startNewThread(Runnable {
        for (i in 1..5) {
            val t = Thread(Runnable {
                Thread.sleep(50)
                var a = i
                kotlin.io.println(Thread.currentThread().name + "|" + "a=$a")
                Thread.sleep(200)
                for (j in 1..5) {
                    a *= j
                    Thread.sleep(100)
                    kotlin.io.println(Thread.currentThread().name + "|" + "$a*$j=$a")
                }
                kotlin.io.println(Thread.currentThread().name + "|TaskDurationInMillis = " + (System.currentTimeMillis() - timeInMillis))
            })
            t.start()
            t.join()
        }
    })

And the result:

Thread-1|a=1
Thread-1|1*1=1
Thread-1|2*2=2
Thread-1|6*3=6
Thread-1|24*4=24
Thread-1|120*5=120
Thread-1|TaskDurationInMillis = 815
Thread-2|a=2
Thread-2|2*1=2
Thread-2|4*2=4
Thread-2|12*3=12
Thread-2|48*4=48
Thread-2|240*5=240
Thread-2|TaskDurationInMillis = 1568
Thread-3|a=3
Thread-3|3*1=3
Thread-3|6*2=6
Thread-3|18*3=18
Thread-3|72*4=72
Thread-3|360*5=360
Thread-3|TaskDurationInMillis = 2323
Thread-4|a=4
Thread-4|4*1=4
Thread-4|8*2=8
Thread-4|24*3=24
Thread-4|96*4=96
Thread-4|480*5=480
Thread-4|TaskDurationInMillis = 3078
Thread-5|a=5
Thread-5|5*1=5
Thread-5|10*2=10
Thread-5|30*3=30
Thread-5|120*4=120
Thread-5|600*5=600
Thread-5|TaskDurationInMillis = 3833

As it's clear when we use the join:

  1. The threads are running sequentially.
  2. The first sample takes 765 Milliseconds while the second sample takes 3833 Milliseconds.

Our solution to prevent blocking other threads was creating an ArrayList:

val threads = ArrayList<Thread>()

Now when we want to start a new thread we most add it to the ArrayList:

addThreadToArray(
    ThreadUtils.startNewThread(Runnable {
        ...
    })
)

The addThreadToArray function:

@Synchronized
fun addThreadToArray(th: Thread) {
    threads.add(th)
}

The startNewThread funstion:

fun startNewThread(runnable: Runnable) : Thread {
    val th = Thread(runnable)
    th.isDaemon = false
    th.priority = Thread.MAX_PRIORITY
    th.start()
    return th
}

Check the completion of the threads as below everywhere it's needed:

val notAliveThreads = ArrayList<Thread>()
for (t in threads)
    if (!t.isAlive)
        notAliveThreads.add(t)
threads.removeAll(notAliveThreads)
if (threads.size == 0){
    // The size is 0 -> there is no alive threads.
}
0

The problem with:

for(i = 0; i < threads.length; i++)
  threads[i].join();

...is, that threads[i + 1] never can join before threads[i]. Except the "latch"ed ones, all solutions have this lack.

No one here (yet) mentioned ExecutorCompletionService, it allows to join threads/tasks according to their completion order:

public class ExecutorCompletionService<V> extends Object implements CompletionService<V>

A CompletionService that uses a supplied Executor to execute tasks. This class arranges that submitted tasks are, upon completion, placed on a queue accessible using take. The class is lightweight enough to be suitable for transient use when processing groups of tasks.

Usage Examples.

Suppose you have a set of solvers for a certain problem, each returning a value of some type Result, and would like to run them concurrently, processing the results of each of them that return a non-null value, in some method use(Result r). You could write this as:

void solve(Executor e, Collection<Callable<Result>> solvers) throws InterruptedException, ExecutionException {
  CompletionService<Result> cs = new ExecutorCompletionService<>(e);
  solvers.forEach(cs::submit);
  for (int i = solvers.size(); i > 0; i--) {
    Result r = cs.take().get();
    if (r != null)
      use(r);
  }
}

Suppose instead that you would like to use the first non-null result of the set of tasks, ignoring any that encounter exceptions, and cancelling all other tasks when the first one is ready:

void solve(Executor e, Collection<Callable<Result>> solvers) throws InterruptedException {
  CompletionService<Result> cs = new ExecutorCompletionService<>(e);
  int n = solvers.size();
  List<Future<Result>> futures = new ArrayList<>(n);
  Result result = null;
  try {
    solvers.forEach(solver -> futures.add(cs.submit(solver)));
    for (int i = n; i > 0; i--) {
      try {
        Result r = cs.take().get();
        if (r != null) {
          result = r;
          break;
        }
      } catch (ExecutionException ignore) {}
    }
  } finally {
    futures.forEach(future -> future.cancel(true));
  }

  if (result != null)
    use(result);
}

Since: 1.5 (!)

Assuming use(r) (of Example 1) also asynchronous, we had a big advantage. #

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