I'm trying to build two functions using PyCrypto that accept two parameters: the message and the key, and then encrypt/decrypt the message.

I found several links on the web to help me out, but each one of them has flaws:

This one at codekoala uses os.urandom, which is discouraged by PyCrypto.

Moreover, the key I give to the function is not guaranteed to have the exact length expected. What can I do to make that happen ?

Also, there are several modes, which one is recommended? I don't know what to use :/

Finally, what exactly is the IV? Can I provide a different IV for encrypting and decrypting, or will this return in a different result?

Here's what I've done so far:

from Crypto import Random
from Crypto.Cipher import AES
import base64

BLOCK_SIZE=32

def encrypt(message, passphrase):
    # passphrase MUST be 16, 24 or 32 bytes long, how can I do that ?
    IV = Random.new().read(BLOCK_SIZE)
    aes = AES.new(passphrase, AES.MODE_CFB, IV)
    return base64.b64encode(aes.encrypt(message))

def decrypt(encrypted, passphrase):
    IV = Random.new().read(BLOCK_SIZE)
    aes = AES.new(passphrase, AES.MODE_CFB, IV)
    return aes.decrypt(base64.b64decode(encrypted))
up vote 105 down vote accepted

Here is my implementation and works for me with some fixes and enhances the alignment of the key and secret phrase with 32 bytes and iv to 16 bytes:

import base64
import hashlib
from Crypto import Random
from Crypto.Cipher import AES

class AESCipher(object):

    def __init__(self, key): 
        self.bs = 32
        self.key = hashlib.sha256(key.encode()).digest()

    def encrypt(self, raw):
        raw = self._pad(raw)
        iv = Random.new().read(AES.block_size)
        cipher = AES.new(self.key, AES.MODE_CBC, iv)
        return base64.b64encode(iv + cipher.encrypt(raw))

    def decrypt(self, enc):
        enc = base64.b64decode(enc)
        iv = enc[:AES.block_size]
        cipher = AES.new(self.key, AES.MODE_CBC, iv)
        return self._unpad(cipher.decrypt(enc[AES.block_size:])).decode('utf-8')

    def _pad(self, s):
        return s + (self.bs - len(s) % self.bs) * chr(self.bs - len(s) % self.bs)

    @staticmethod
    def _unpad(s):
        return s[:-ord(s[len(s)-1:])]
  • 11
    I know this has been up for a while but I think this response may spread some confusion. This function uses a block_size of 32 byte (256 byte) to pad input data but AES uses 128 bit block size. In AES256 the key is 256 bit, but not the block size. – Tannin Dec 24 '15 at 13:29
  • 7
    to put it another way, "self.bs" should be removed and replaced by "AES.block_size" – Alexis May 27 '17 at 14:24
  • Why are you hashing the key? If you're expecting that this is something like a password, then you shouldn't be using SHA256; better to use a key derivation function, like PBKDF2, which PyCrypto provides. – tweaksp Jun 20 '17 at 18:43
  • 2
    @Chris - SHA256 gives out a 32-byte hash - a perfect-sized key for AES256. Generation/derivation of a key is assumed to be random/secure and should be out of the encryption/decryption code's scope - hashing is just a guarantee that the key is usable with the selected cipher. – zwer Jun 20 '17 at 20:35
  • 1
    in _pad self.bs access is needed and in _unpad doesn't need – mnothic Jul 5 '17 at 13:56

You may need the following two functions to pad(when do encryption) and unpad(when do decryption) when the length of input is not a multiple of BLOCK_SIZE.

BS = 16
pad = lambda s: s + (BS - len(s) % BS) * chr(BS - len(s) % BS) 
unpad = lambda s : s[:-ord(s[len(s)-1:])]

So you're asking the length of key? You can use the md5sum of the key rather than use it directly.

More, according to my little experience of using PyCrypto, the IV is used to mix up the output of a encryption when input is same, so the IV is chosen as a random string, and use it as part of the encryption output, and then use it to decrypt the message.

And here's my implementation, hope it will be useful for you:

import base64
from Crypto.Cipher import AES
from Crypto import Random

class AESCipher:
    def __init__( self, key ):
        self.key = key

    def encrypt( self, raw ):
        raw = pad(raw)
        iv = Random.new().read( AES.block_size )
        cipher = AES.new( self.key, AES.MODE_CBC, iv )
        return base64.b64encode( iv + cipher.encrypt( raw ) ) 

    def decrypt( self, enc ):
        enc = base64.b64decode(enc)
        iv = enc[:16]
        cipher = AES.new(self.key, AES.MODE_CBC, iv )
        return unpad(cipher.decrypt( enc[16:] ))
  • 1
    What happens if you have an input that is exactly a multiple of BLOCK_SIZE? I think that the unpad function would get a little confused... – Kjir Oct 21 '13 at 10:43
  • 2
    @Kjir, then a sequence of value chr(BS) in length BLOCK_SIZE will be appended to the origin data. – Marcus Oct 22 '13 at 4:14
  • 1
    @Marcus the pad function is broken (at least in Py3), replace with s[:-ord(s[len(s)-1:])] for it to work across versions. – Torxed Feb 24 '14 at 11:06
  • 2
    @Torxed pad function is avail in CryptoUtil.Padding.pad() with pycryptodome (pycrypto followup) – comte Apr 11 '17 at 15:46
  • 2
    Why not just have a character constant as the padding char? – Inaimathi Apr 25 '17 at 14:48

You can get a passphrase out of an arbitrary password by using a cryptographic hash function (NOT Python's builtin hash) like SHA-1 or SHA-256. Python includes support for both in its standard library:

import hashlib

hashlib.sha1("this is my awesome password").digest() # => a 20 byte string
hashlib.sha256("another awesome password").digest() # => a 32 byte string

You can truncate a cryptographic hash value just by using [:16] or [:24] and it will retain its security up to the length you specify.

For someone who would like to use urlsafe_b64encode and urlsafe_b64decode, here are the version that're working for me (after spending some time with the unicode issue)

BS = 16
key = hashlib.md5(settings.SECRET_KEY).hexdigest()[:BS]
pad = lambda s: s + (BS - len(s) % BS) * chr(BS - len(s) % BS)
unpad = lambda s : s[:-ord(s[len(s)-1:])]

class AESCipher:
    def __init__(self, key):
        self.key = key

    def encrypt(self, raw):
        raw = pad(raw)
        iv = Random.new().read(AES.block_size)
        cipher = AES.new(self.key, AES.MODE_CBC, iv)
        return base64.urlsafe_b64encode(iv + cipher.encrypt(raw)) 

    def decrypt(self, enc):
        enc = base64.urlsafe_b64decode(enc.encode('utf-8'))
        iv = enc[:BS]
        cipher = AES.new(self.key, AES.MODE_CBC, iv)
        return unpad(cipher.decrypt(enc[BS:]))
  • This code will break if BS=32 – Alec Matusis Oct 7 '15 at 19:59

Let me address your question about "modes." AES256 is a kind of block cipher. It takes as input a 32-byte key and a 16-byte string, called the block and outputs a block. We use AES in a mode of operation in order to encrypt. The solutions above suggest using CBC, which is one example. Another is called CTR, and it's somewhat easier to use:

from Crypto.Cipher import AES
from Crypto.Util import Counter
from Crypto import Random

# AES supports multiple key sizes: 16 (AES128), 24 (AES192), or 32 (AES256).
key_bytes = 32

# Takes as input a 32-byte key and an arbitrary-length plaintext and returns a
# pair (iv, ciphtertext). "iv" stands for initialization vector.
def encrypt(key, plaintext):
    assert len(key) == key_bytes

    # Choose a random, 16-byte IV.
    iv = Random.new().read(AES.block_size)

    # Convert the IV to a Python integer.
    iv_int = int(binascii.hexlify(iv), 16) 

    # Create a new Counter object with IV = iv_int.
    ctr = Counter.new(AES.block_size * 8, initial_value=iv_int)

    # Create AES-CTR cipher.
    aes = AES.new(key, AES.MODE_CTR, counter=ctr)

    # Encrypt and return IV and ciphertext.
    ciphertext = aes.encrypt(plaintext)
    return (iv, ciphertext)

# Takes as input a 32-byte key, a 16-byte IV, and a ciphertext, and outputs the
# corresponding plaintext.
def decrypt(key, iv, ciphertext):
    assert len(key) == key_bytes

    # Initialize counter for decryption. iv should be the same as the output of
    # encrypt().
    iv_int = int(iv.encode('hex'), 16) 
    ctr = Counter.new(AES.block_size * 8, initial_value=iv_int)

    # Create AES-CTR cipher.
    aes = AES.new(key, AES.MODE_CTR, counter=ctr)

    # Decrypt and return the plaintext.
    plaintext = aes.decrypt(ciphertext)
    return plaintext

(iv, ciphertext) = encrypt(key, 'hella')
print decrypt(key, iv, ciphertext)

This is often referred to as AES-CTR. I would advise caution in using AES-CBC with PyCrypto. The reason is that it requires you to specify the padding scheme, as exemplified by the other solutions given. In general, if you're not very careful about the padding, there are attacks that completely break encryption!

Now, it's important to note that the key must be a random, 32-byte string; a password does not suffice. Normally, the key is generated like so:

# Nominal way to generate a fresh key. This calls the system's random number
# generator (RNG).
key1 = Random.new().read(key_bytes)

A key may be derived from a password, too:

# It's also possible to derive a key from a password, but it's important that
# the password have high entropy, meaning difficult to predict.
password = "This is a rather weak password."

# For added # security, we add a "salt", which increases the entropy.
#
# In this example, we use the same RNG to produce the salt that we used to
# produce key1.
salt_bytes = 8 
salt = Random.new().read(salt_bytes)

# Stands for "Password-based key derivation function 2"
key2 = PBKDF2(password, salt, key_bytes)

Some solutions above suggest using SHA256 for deriving the key, but this is generally considered bad cryptographic practice. Check out wikipedia for more on modes of operation.

For the benefit of others, here is my decryption implementation which I got to by combining the answers of @Cyril and @Marcus. This assumes that this coming in via HTTP Request with the encryptedText quoted and base64 encoded.

import base64
import urllib2
from Crypto.Cipher import AES


def decrypt(quotedEncodedEncrypted):
    key = 'SecretKey'

    encodedEncrypted = urllib2.unquote(quotedEncodedEncrypted)

    cipher = AES.new(key)
    decrypted = cipher.decrypt(base64.b64decode(encodedEncrypted))[:16]

    for i in range(1, len(base64.b64decode(encodedEncrypted))/16):
        cipher = AES.new(key, AES.MODE_CBC, base64.b64decode(encodedEncrypted)[(i-1)*16:i*16])
        decrypted += cipher.decrypt(base64.b64decode(encodedEncrypted)[i*16:])[:16]

    return decrypted.strip()

It's little late but i think this will be very helpful. No one mention about use scheme like PKCS#7 padding. You can use it instead the previous functions to pad(when do encryption) and unpad(when do decryption).i will provide the full Source Code below.

import base64
import hashlib
from Crypto import Random
from Crypto.Cipher import AES
import pkcs7
class Encryption:

    def __init__(self):
        pass

    def Encrypt(self, PlainText, SecurePassword):
        pw_encode = SecurePassword.encode('utf-8')
        text_encode = PlainText.encode('utf-8')

        key = hashlib.sha256(pw_encode).digest()
        iv = Random.new().read(AES.block_size)

        cipher = AES.new(key, AES.MODE_CBC, iv)
        pad_text = pkcs7.encode(text_encode)
        msg = iv + cipher.encrypt(pad_text)

        EncodeMsg = base64.b64encode(msg)
        return EncodeMsg

    def Decrypt(self, Encrypted, SecurePassword):
        decodbase64 = base64.b64decode(Encrypted.decode("utf-8"))
        pw_encode = SecurePassword.decode('utf-8')

        iv = decodbase64[:AES.block_size]
        key = hashlib.sha256(pw_encode).digest()

        cipher = AES.new(key, AES.MODE_CBC, iv)
        msg = cipher.decrypt(decodbase64[AES.block_size:])
        pad_text = pkcs7.decode(msg)

        decryptedString = pad_text.decode('utf-8')
        return decryptedString

import StringIO
import binascii


def decode(text, k=16):
    nl = len(text)
    val = int(binascii.hexlify(text[-1]), 16)
    if val > k:
        raise ValueError('Input is not padded or padding is corrupt')

    l = nl - val
    return text[:l]


def encode(text, k=16):
    l = len(text)
    output = StringIO.StringIO()
    val = k - (l % k)
    for _ in xrange(val):
        output.write('%02x' % val)
    return text + binascii.unhexlify(output.getvalue())

  • I don't know who downvoted the answer but I'd be curious to know why. Maybe this method is not secure? An explanation would be great. – Cyril N. Nov 19 '16 at 8:03
  • at least i'm not the one who downvote it :) – xXxpRoGrAmmErxXx Nov 19 '16 at 11:47
  • 1
    @CyrilN. This answer suggests that hashing the password with a single invocation of SHA-256 is enough. It isn't. You really should use PBKDF2 or similar for key derivation from a password using a large iteration count. – Artjom B. Mar 3 '17 at 6:19
  • Thank you for the detail @ArtjomB.! – Cyril N. Mar 3 '17 at 8:13
  • I have a key and also iv key with 44 length. How can i use your functions ?! all of algorithms in the internet that i found, has problem with length of my vector key – mahshid.r Sep 29 at 9:10

Another take on this (heavily derived from solutions above) but

  • uses null for padding
  • does not use lambda (never been a fan)
  • tested with python 2.7 and 3.6.5

    #!/usr/bin/python2.7
    # you'll have to adjust for your setup, e.g., #!/usr/bin/python3
    
    
    import base64, re
    from Crypto.Cipher import AES
    from Crypto import Random
    from django.conf import settings
    
    class AESCipher:
        """
          Usage:
          aes = AESCipher( settings.SECRET_KEY[:16], 32)
          encryp_msg = aes.encrypt( 'ppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppp' )
          msg = aes.decrypt( encryp_msg )
          print("'{}'".format(msg))
        """
        def __init__(self, key, blk_sz):
            self.key = key
            self.blk_sz = blk_sz
    
        def encrypt( self, raw ):
            if raw is None or len(raw) == 0:
                raise NameError("No value given to encrypt")
            raw = raw + '\0' * (self.blk_sz - len(raw) % self.blk_sz)
            raw = raw.encode('utf-8')
            iv = Random.new().read( AES.block_size )
            cipher = AES.new( self.key.encode('utf-8'), AES.MODE_CBC, iv )
            return base64.b64encode( iv + cipher.encrypt( raw ) ).decode('utf-8')
    
        def decrypt( self, enc ):
            if enc is None or len(enc) == 0:
                raise NameError("No value given to decrypt")
            enc = base64.b64decode(enc)
            iv = enc[:16]
            cipher = AES.new(self.key.encode('utf-8'), AES.MODE_CBC, iv )
            return re.sub(b'\x00*$', b'', cipher.decrypt( enc[16:])).decode('utf-8')
    
  • This will not work if the input byte[] has trailing nulls because in the decrypt() function you will eat your padding nulls PLUS any trailing nulls. – Buzz Moschetti Dec 31 '17 at 18:48
  • Yes, as I state above, this logic pads with nulls. If the items you want encode/decode might have trailing nulls, better use one of the other solutions here – MIkee Jan 1 at 22:12
from Crypto import Random
from Crypto.Cipher import AES
import base64

BLOCK_SIZE=16
def trans(key):
     return md5.new(key).digest()

def encrypt(message, passphrase):
    passphrase = trans(passphrase)
    IV = Random.new().read(BLOCK_SIZE)
    aes = AES.new(passphrase, AES.MODE_CFB, IV)
    return base64.b64encode(IV + aes.encrypt(message))

def decrypt(encrypted, passphrase):
    passphrase = trans(passphrase)
    encrypted = base64.b64decode(encrypted)
    IV = encrypted[:BLOCK_SIZE]
    aes = AES.new(passphrase, AES.MODE_CFB, IV)
    return aes.decrypt(encrypted[BLOCK_SIZE:])
  • 9
    Please provide not only code but also explain what you are doing and why this is better / what is the difference to existing answers. – Florian Koch Aug 11 '16 at 13:53
  • Replace the md5.new(key).digest() by md5(key).digest(), and it work like a charm ! – A STEFANI May 21 at 16:41

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