112

What's the most efficient way to determine if a table is empty (that is, currently contains neither array-style values nor dict-style values)?

Currently, I'm using next():

if not next(myTable) then
    -- Table is empty
end

Is there a more efficient way?

Note: The # operator does not suffice here, as it only operates on the array-style values in the table - thus #{test=2} is indistinguishable from #{} because both return 0. Also note that checking if the table variable is nil does not suffice as I am not looking for nil values, but rather tables with 0 entries (i.e. {}).

135

Your code is efficient but wrong. (Consider {[false]=0}.) The correct code is

if next(myTable) == nil then
   -- myTable is empty
end

For maximum efficiency you'll want to bind next to a local variable, e.g.,

...
local next = next 
...
... if next(...) ...
  • 1
    Good point on the technical correctness; in the particular cases I've been utilizing the original code, false wouldn't be an expected key so the if not worked fine, but I'll probably make a habit of comparing to nil instead in the future, just as a good habit. And yes, I've been binding common utility functions to local vars for speed. Thanks for the input though. – Amber Aug 10 '09 at 1:41
  • 1
    I find it hard to agree with wrongness when the code works as intended – R.D. Alkire Sep 11 '16 at 16:26
  • 3
    Why do we gain speed by doing local next? – Moberg Oct 2 '16 at 20:22
  • 2
    @Moberg This is due to how LUA handles its namespace. The very dumbed down version, is it will first climb up the local tables, so if there is a local next in the current block, it will use that, then climb up to the next block, and repeat. Once out of locals, it will only then use the Global Namespace. This is a dumbed down version of it, but in the end, it definitely means the difference in regards to program speed. – ATaco Nov 29 '16 at 4:45
  • @Moberg the less dumbed down version, in the context of lua 5.2 & 5.3, is that non locals are either upvals or _ENV lookups. An upval has to go through an extra layer of indirection, whereas an _ENV lookup is a table lookup. Whereas a local is a register in the VM – Demur Rumed Jul 28 '17 at 0:30
1

One possibility would be to count the number of elements, by using the metatable "newindex" key. When assigning something not nil, increment the counter (the counter could live in the metatable as well) and when assigning nil, decrement the counter.

Testing for empty table would be to test the counter with 0.

Here's a pointer to metatable documentation

I do like your solution though, and I honestly can't assume that my solution is faster overall.

  • 5
    The original question is not about counting just "array" entries. – lhf Aug 10 '09 at 2:48
  • 3
    0x6's suggestion isn't specific to array-style entries (newindex works for both numerical and non-numerical indices). However, the main issue would be detecting when nil is assigned, since __newindex does not trigger if the key already exists in the table. – Amber Aug 10 '09 at 3:09
  • 3
    For this trick to work, the metatable would have to implement both __index and __newindex, storing the actual data in a shadow table and keeping the real table empty so that __index will be invoked at all. Thinking out loud, I suspect that the raised cost of every single lookup can't be worth it. – RBerteig Aug 10 '09 at 6:32
0

This is probably what you wanted:

function table.empty (self)
    for _, _ in pairs(self) do
        return false
    end
    return true
end

a = { }
print(table.empty(a))
a["hi"] = 2
print(table.empty(a))
a["hi"] = nil
print(table.empty(a))

Output:

true
false
true
  • 10
    next() is more efficient (and more concise) than looping over pairs(). – Amber Apr 11 '12 at 22:39
  • 7
    In fact, looping over pairs() is essentially just using the next() technique, but with more overhead. – dubiousjim Jun 1 '12 at 19:29
  • 7
    Also, writing into the standard table library is not recommended. – Ti Strga Apr 17 '14 at 22:53
-1

I know this is old, and I could be misunderstanding you somehow, but it you just want the table to be empty, that is, unless you are just checking if it is and you don't actually want or need it to be empty, you can clear it by simply recreating it, unless I'm mistaken. this can be done with the below syntax.

yourtablename = {} -- this seems to work for me when I need to clear a table.
  • 4
    That's not the question. – Yu Hao May 4 '16 at 15:51
-1

better to avoid the evaluation of __eq if overloaded.

if rawequal(next(myTable), nil) then
   -- myTable is empty
end

or

if type(next(myTable)) == "nil" then
   -- myTable is empty
end
  • Please try to properly format your code – Jaswant Singh Dec 3 '18 at 17:48
-1

try serpent, work for me

serpent = require 'serpent'

function vtext(value)
  return serpent.block(value, {comment=false})
end

myTable = {}

if type(myTable) == 'table' and vtext(myTable) == '{}' then
   -- myTable is empty
end
-1

How about this ?

if endmyTable[1] == nil then
  -- myTable is empty
end
  • This won't work on a table that as strings as index's – SamzSakerz Aug 2 at 0:01
-5

Try using #. It returns all the instances that are in a table. If there aren't instances in a table,then it returns 0

if #myTable==0 then
print('There is no instance in this table')
end
  • 1
    The asker says that # won't suffice here, and gives reasons why; could you explain why this gets around those reasons? – ameed Jan 4 '17 at 2:33
  • well...i don't know.I am new in this so the only way i know is using # – arthurgps2 Jan 5 '17 at 19:51

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