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The write system call prototype is:

ssize_t write(int fd, const void *buf, size_t count);

The count parameter is unsigned, and the return value is signed.

The help page says:

On success, the number of bytes written is returned (zero indicates nothing was written). On error, -1 is returned, and errno is set appropriately.

However, it doesn't say what is the limit to the count parameter. It still doesn't say the behavior when count is greater than SSIZE_MAX.

Considering write is a system call that can be used to generic devices/files/whatever, if the device supports write operations bigger than SSIZE_MAX, the returning type can't handle the real number of bytes writen.

Doesn't make sense to me to be able to pass an unsigned number of bytes and get back an signed number of bytes as a result. Why not just pass an signed number?

It feels like the prototype of the write function in sort of error prone, or at least it leaves a possible hole in the path.

Does anyone knows the details about it or where can I find this information?

  • I do not know it myself, but I believe the limit is of size unsigned integer. Which means, you should be able to write 4294967296 bytes at once. The return value in this case would be -1 (and you'd have to check errno to make sure that it's actually an error) – ATaylor Sep 21 '12 at 13:42
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    POSIX says "If the value of nbyte is greater than {SSIZE_MAX}, the result is implementation-defined", so the Linux manpage is lacking -- it should describe this. – Fred Foo Sep 21 '12 at 13:43
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    It's customary to write() with smallish chunks. I'm having difficulty imagining a situation where writing gigabytes with a single syscall would be a good idea. – willglynn Sep 21 '12 at 13:49
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    I don't want to write a big chunck of data. The problem is I'm writing a platform abstraction layer and I need to create a wrapper to this function. I'm using that for sockets. I'd like to understand the problems related to this situation. – Marcus Sep 21 '12 at 13:53
  • @Marcus: For sockets, your limit is probably much much lower than SSIZE_MAX, and tied to the buffer sizes configured on the socket with ioctl and/or setsockopt. – Ben Voigt Sep 21 '12 at 14:05
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I don't think there is a hard limit, it depends on what fd points to. If it's a file on the filesystem for instance, then the file system driver will choke if you exceed the "max file size limit", returning EFBIG error:

EFBIG An attempt was made to write a file that exceeds the implementation- defined maximum file size or the process file size limit.

  • Right, that parameter just gets passed through to the device-specific implementation. – Ben Voigt Sep 21 '12 at 14:03
  • If fd refers to a socket (typically a non-blocking one) one might get ENOMEM . – alk Sep 21 '12 at 14:05
  • I'm not exactly worried about the sockets case. The main point is: If the device supports write operations bigger than SSIZE_MAX, the returning type can't handle the real number of bytes writen. It feels like the prototype of the write function in sort of error prone, or at least it leaves a possible hole in the path. – Marcus Sep 21 '12 at 14:12
  • @Marcus - On what system can you realistically allocate a buffer larger than SSIZE_MAX? I believe available memory is limiting, not the device. – Bo Persson Sep 21 '12 at 17:17
  • @Bo Persson - It is not a matter of being able to do so. The point is the function interface is strange. It says it would return the number of bytes writen, but it can't really do that. There is a big "BUT" in that described as "implementation dependent". However I could not find any information regarding that for the linux implementation. – Marcus Sep 21 '12 at 18:03
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Googled it:

If the value of nbyte is greater than {SSIZE_MAX}, the result is implementation-defined.

Source: http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/write.html

  • I know that is implementation defined (as stated in most of the posts above). However I couldn't find a single place where that behavior is explained for a particular implementation. I believe the "implementation" means a device/filesystem/whatever implementation. Do you know some place where this situation is observed? – Marcus Sep 21 '12 at 15:00
  • Implementation means whoever wrote that function. Likely your compiler provider or OS provider. Check with the docs of the compiler or OS. Since you tagged linux, it's probably GCC with the GNU C library. Unfortunately the docs for it gnu.org/software/libc/manual/html_node/… do not specify the implementation defined behavior (may want to file a bug report on the documentation). Unless you (as many) believe "the code is the documentation", in which case just go look at the code (which is the whole point of open source). – Analog File Sep 21 '12 at 15:10
  • Probably I'll place a bug report. Thanks. – Marcus Sep 21 '12 at 16:55
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I think remember that the system allocate the number of bytes you give to the function. But i'm not sure. Maybe you shall try size_t and ssize_t man pages.

  • I made a mistake, there is in the include folder, but i don't know in wich one it is =S I hope you will find it ! – Simon MILHAU Sep 21 '12 at 13:56
  • Don't worry! Thanks for your help. :D – Marcus Sep 21 '12 at 14:09

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