1

using only bitwise operators (|, &, ~, ^, >>, <<), is it possible to replace the != below?

// ...
if(a != b){
    // Some code
}
/// ...

this is mainly out of self interest, since I saw how to do it with == but not !=.

6
  • a and b are uints? or strings?
    – duedl0r
    Sep 21, 2012 at 23:30
  • how does bitwise operation make sense with strings?
    – nothrow
    Sep 21, 2012 at 23:32
  • not bitwise, but still worth mentioning? if(a<b || a>b)
    – ajax333221
    Sep 21, 2012 at 23:36
  • @ajax333221 Incidentally, your solution is not entirely correct for floating point numbers; NaN is neither less than nor greater than any other value.
    – willglynn
    Sep 21, 2012 at 23:39
  • @willglynn and I suspect it is neither equal (note: at least that is the case in JavaScript)
    – ajax333221
    Sep 21, 2012 at 23:51

6 Answers 6

8
if(a ^ b) {
    //some code
}

should work.

You can also use your preferred method for == and add ^ 0xFFFFFFFF behind it (with the right amount of Fs to match the length of the datatype). This negates the value (same as ! in front of it).

1
  • 1
    Alternatively one can express (a XOR b) as (((NOT a) AND b) OR (a AND NOT(b))), if XOR is unavailable. Sep 22, 2012 at 0:08
3

a != b means that there is at least one different bit in the bit representations of a and b. The XOR bit operator returns 1 if both input bit operands are different, 0 otherwise.

So, you can apply a XOR operation to a and b and check if the result is not equal to zero.

0

A bitwise version of the '!=' test could look something like:

if((a - b) | (b - a)) {
    /* code... */
}

which ORs the two subtractions. If the two numbers are the same, the result will be 0. However, if they differ (aka, the '!=' operator) then the result will be 1.

Note: The above snippet will only work with integers (and those integers should probably be unsigned).

If you want to simulate the '==' operator, however, check out Fabian Giesen's answer in Replacing "==" with bitwise operators

0

x ^ y isn't always sufficient. Use !!(x ^ y). Values expecting a one bit return value will not work with x ^ y since it leaves a remainder that could be greater than just 1.

0

Yes, using this:

if (a ^ b) { }
0
-2

"~" is equaled to NOT so that should work. example would be "a & ~b".

1
  • 15 & ~0 = 15. You need to think more in binary
    – phuclv
    Feb 3, 2019 at 9:22

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