3

I am trying to implement Entity Framework in my application and i should be able to commit and rollback the changes manually.

First time when i execute the update statement it updates the table successfully and i am able to rollback the changes. This is correct

But second time when i execute the update statement, it updates the table successfully and also commits the changes. So I am unable to rollback manually. This is wrong

Please let me know why it is happening and how to solve this issue.

The below code is just sample to reproduce my problem.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Data.Common;
using System.Data;

namespace EFTest
{
    public class DBOperations
    {
        NorthwindEntities NorthwindContext;
        DbTransaction transObject;

        public DBOperations()
        {
        }

        public void ConnectDB()
        {
            try
            {
                if (NorthwindContext == null)
                {
                    NorthwindContext = new NorthwindEntities();
                    if (NorthwindContext != null && NorthwindContext.Connection.State != ConnectionState.Open)
                    {
                        NorthwindContext.Connection.Open();
                        transObject = NorthwindContext.Connection.BeginTransaction(IsolationLevel.ReadUncommitted);
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw new Exception("Database Error " + ex.Message);
            }
        }

        public int disconnect()
        {
            if (NorthwindContext != null && transObject != null)
            {
                try
                {
                    transObject.Rollback();
                }
                catch (Exception)
                {
                }
                transObject.Dispose();
                NorthwindContext.Connection.Close();
                NorthwindContext.Dispose();
            }

            return 0;
        }

        public void CommitTransaction()
        {
            if (NorthwindContext != null && transObject != null)
            {
                try
                {
                    transObject.Commit();
                }
                catch (Exception)
                {
                }
            }
        }

        public void RollbackTransaction()
        {
            if (NorthwindContext != null && transObject != null)
            {
                try
                {
                    transObject.Rollback();
                }
                catch (Exception)
                {
                }
            }
        }

        public int UpdateDB()
        {
            int _returnVal = 0;


            try
            {
                NorthwindContext.ExecuteStoreCommand("UPDATE Orders SET OrderDate = GETDATE() WHERE OrderID = '10248'");
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw new Exception("Database Error " + ex.Message);
            }

            return _returnVal;
        }
    }

    public class program
    {
        public program()
        {
            //Establishing the connection.
            DBOperations _DBOperations = new DBOperations();
            _DBOperations.ConnectDB();

            //Update the datebase
            _DBOperations.UpdateDB();                           //Update the database but it doesn't commit the changes.                       

            //Issue Rollback to rollback the transaction.
            _DBOperations.RollbackTransaction();                //Successfully Rollbacks the database changes.


            //Again Update the datebase
            _DBOperations.UpdateDB();                           //Update the database it commits the changes. 

            //Issue Rollback to rollback the transaction.
            _DBOperations.RollbackTransaction();                //Rollback fails.

        }
    }
}
5
  • Use TransactionScope – Gert Arnold Sep 23 '12 at 10:00
  • @GertArnold Yes i thought about it but how to manually commit or rollback using TransactionScope? – ksvimal Sep 24 '12 at 5:05
  • To commit, you only have to Complete() a transaction scope. If you dispose a TS without completing it rolls back. – Gert Arnold Sep 24 '12 at 8:34
  • Question: do you only execute a store command? – Gert Arnold Sep 24 '12 at 8:36
  • @GertArnold No. I am using Context.SaveChanges() also but in one scenario I am using store command just to check whether a particular row is locked in a table. I am new to the EntityframeWork, So I am trying to build best logic. I think it is good have more than one instance of context, may be one context per screen. Is it correct? please correct me if I am wrong. – ksvimal Sep 26 '12 at 5:43
1

With TransactionScope Your DbOperations could look like this:

public class DBOperations : IDisposable
{
    NorthwindEntities _context;
    private TransactionScope _transactionScope;

    public DBOperations()
    {
        this.Initialize();
    }

    private void Initialize()
    {
        try
        {
            this.Dispose();
            this._transactionScope = new TransactionScope();
            this._context = new NorthwindEntities();
            // no need to open connection. Let EF manage that.
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw new Exception("Database Error " + ex.Message);
        }
    }

    public void RollbackTransaction()
    {
            try
            {
                this._transactionScope.Dispose();
                this._transactionScope = null;
                this.Dispose();
                this.Initialize();
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                // TODO
            }
    }

    public int UpdateDB()
    {
        int _returnVal = 0;
        try
        {
            this._context.ExecuteStoreCommand("UPDATE Orders SET OrderDate = GETDATE() WHERE OrderID = '10248'");
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw new Exception("Database Error " + ex.Message);
        }
        return _returnVal;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (this._transactionScope != null)
        {
            this._transactionScope.Complete();
            this._transactionScope.Dispose();
        }
        if (this._context != null) this._context.Dispose();
    }
}

And the program:

public class program
{
    public program()
    {
        using (DBOperations dbOperations = new DBOperations())
        {
            dbOperations.UpdateDB(); // Update the database no commit.

            dbOperations.RollbackTransaction(); // Rollback.

            dbOperations.UpdateDB(); // Update the database no commit.

            dbOperations.RollbackTransaction(); // Rollback.
        } // Commit on Dispose.
    }
}

A connection that is opened within the scope of a TransactionScope automatically enlists in the transaction. The transaction is only committed by calling Commplete(). Disposing or unhandled exceptions will cause a rollback.

If you do more than just a store command, as in changing objects and relying on the context's change tracking, you may to implement a retry mechanism in stead of just discarding the context and the changes.

4
  • No. I am using Context.SaveChanges() also but in one scenario I am using store command just to check whether a particular row is locked in a table. I am new to the EntityframeWork, So I am trying to build best logic. I think it is good have more than one instance of context, may be one context per screen. Is it correct? please correct me if I am wrong – ksvimal Sep 26 '12 at 5:50
  • Yes, context instances come and go. They should be short-lived. Like one per web request or one per service call. One per screen in a Windows application may work (because often lazy loading can happen) but even then it is better to load what you need and then dispose. – Gert Arnold Sep 26 '12 at 7:04
  • Thanks a lot for you feedback. It really helps me in understanding EF. But I have lot of questions regarding EF. Will you help me? – ksvimal Sep 26 '12 at 13:23
  • Just ask your questions here at SO and anyone, including me, will see if they help. Check if there are no answers yet, though. – Gert Arnold Sep 26 '12 at 13:45
1

You need to assign new transaction after commit or rollback of transaction .

public program()
{
    //Establishing the connection.
    DBOperations _DBOperations = new DBOperations();
    _DBOperations.ConnectDB();

    //Update the datebase
    _DBOperations.UpdateDB();    //Update the database but it doesn't commit the changes.

    //Issue Rollback to rollback the transaction.
    _DBOperations.RollbackTransaction();    //Successfully Rollbacks the database changes.

    _DBOperations.ConnectDB(); //you need to assign new transaction because your last 
                               //transaction is over when you commit or roll back 

    _DBOperations.UpdateDB();    //Update the database it commits the changes.

    //Issue Rollback to rollback the transaction.
    _DBOperations.RollbackTransaction();    //Rollback fails.
}
1
  • 1
    Thanks a lot for your feedback... So there is no possibility that i can use the same transaction object through out despite the number of commits and rollbacks... Is it correct? – ksvimal Sep 24 '12 at 5:10

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