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I am working on a regex to extract exact characters from a mainframe log line with fixed width spacing (...regex is not my strong suit, BTW).

I want to extract out the field values for a Status field, which is the fixed-length field that contains the SUCCESSFUL AUDIT, LOGON COMPLETE, and FINAL FAILED AUDIT values shown in the sample events below.

There are many values for this fixed-length field, so I can't really extract out the literal string values like I was trying to do.

Instead, I would like to extract out any characters that start at position 54 of the event and the length is exactly 18 chars.

Any help or ideas regarding the regex or the method, etc, would be greatly appreciated.

528 LOGON   39690  SECURITY LAPTOP    8481 USER AB11 SUCCESSFUL AUDIT  BBB908AFB 06/20/12 09:11:43PM    
528 LOGON   39692  SECURITY LAPTOP    8495 USER AB11 LOGON COMPLETE    BBB908AFB 06/20/12 09:12:12PM    
528 LOGOFF  39699  SECURITY DESKTOP   4476 USER ABEQ FINAL FAILED AUDITAADAFCC01 06/20/12 09:55:49PM   
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  • a) Do you need to use a specific language? If so please add the tag and mention it. b) Is it intended that there is no space after FINAL FAILED AUDIT? c) How does the status field of the last line start at the same position as the first two? LOGOFF and DESKTOP are both one character longer than LOGON and LAPTOP, respectively. Printing the example strings as code instead of a block quote should show this more clearly. Sep 24, 2012 at 5:53

2 Answers 2

1

Consider the following powershell example of a universal regex.

.{53}(.{18})

Example

    $Matches = @()
    $String = '528 LOGON   39690  SECURITY LAPTOP    8481 USER AB11 SUCCESSFUL AUDIT  BBB908AFB 06/20/12 09:11:43PM    
528 LOGON   39692  SECURITY LAPTOP    8495 USER AB11 LOGON COMPLETE    BBB908AFB 06/20/12 09:12:12PM    
528 LOGOFF  39699  SECURITY DESKTOP   4476 USER ABEQ FINAL FAILED AUDITAADAFCC01 06/20/12 09:55:49PM
528 LOGON   39690  SECURITY LAPTOP    8481 USER AB11 REMEBER TO VOTE   BBB908AFB 06/20/12 09:11:43PM'
    Write-Host start with 
    write-host $String
    Write-Host
    Write-Host found
    ([regex]'.{53}(.{18})').matches($String) | foreach {
        write-host "key at $($_.Groups[1].Index) = '$($_.Groups[1].Value)'"
        } # next match

Yields

start with
528 LOGON   39690  SECURITY LAPTOP    8481 USER AB11 SUCCESSFUL AUDIT  BBB908AFB 06/20/12 09:11:43PM    
528 LOGON   39692  SECURITY LAPTOP    8495 USER AB11 LOGON COMPLETE    BBB908AFB 06/20/12 09:12:12PM    
528 LOGOFF  39699  SECURITY DESKTOP   4476 USER ABEQ FINAL FAILED AUDITAADAFCC01 06/20/12 09:55:49PM
528 LOGON   39690  SECURITY LAPTOP    8481 USER AB11 REMEBER TO VOTE   BBB908AFB 06/20/12 09:11:43PM

found
key at 53 = 'SUCCESSFUL AUDIT  '
key at 159 = 'LOGON COMPLETE    '
key at 265 = 'FINAL FAILED AUDIT'
key at 367 = 'REMEBER TO VOTE   '

Summary

  • .{53} skips over the first 53 characters (note the first position in the string is zero)
  • (.{18}) finds and returns the 18 character wide field
0
  1. Regex is a complex solution to this simple problem.
  2. Since the input format and offsets to required output are fixed, just read the input line by line,and do some minor string processing.
  3. If regex is still required, this is a starting point ( though in your own input numbers 54 and 18 do not match to what you want as answer, so I tried with 47 and 16 instead, you can modify as you want) :

    (?<=[a-zA-Z0-9 ]{47})([a-zA-Z0-9 ]{16})

    http://regexr.com?328dm

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  • That did it! I messed with the numbers and it was actually 53/18 but looks like it works. Appreciate the super fast help!
    – user1693497
    Sep 24, 2012 at 6:10
  • 1
    @regexnoob: In that case, the best thank-you note you can give is to accept this answer (click the checkmark next to it). This will also show other users that your problem has been solved, so if anyone encounters the same problem in the future, they know where to look :) Welcome to StackOverflow! Sep 24, 2012 at 6:15
  • I'm still curious how this captures example row 1 (or 2) and 3 at the same time. Sep 24, 2012 at 6:35
  • Nevermind, with the code formatting, I can see the padding now :D. Sep 24, 2012 at 9:11

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