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I've been reading the legacy code,which invloves in the customized memory pooling system, then I found that the code uses _aligned_malloc. I wonder what is this function and when do I have to use it.


Thanks all of you.

I did read MSDN but what I wanted was the answer like "An example of a reason for wanting a certain alignment is to use the data with the SSE instruction set on x86 where the data must be aligned to a multiple 16".

I finally understood what those code means. thanks again.

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    Another example - ARM processor. It requires to align all data to 4 bytes. – Igor Semenov Sep 24 '08 at 8:17
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This function is useful when the alignment of your memory allocation is important to you.

Alignment means that the numerical value of the pointer returned must be evenly divisible by a certain number, ie. ((unsigned int)ptr) % alignment should evaluate to 0.

An example of a reason for wanting a certain alignment is to use the data with the SSE instruction set on x86 where the data must be aligned to a multiple 16.

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  • Or you're trying to store 4 byte longs on a PowerPC (et al) – Andrew Edgecombe Sep 24 '08 at 6:39
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Here is a use case that you might relate to. In my 17 years of C/C++ development I have only once needed the _aligned_malloc() (WinOS implementation) and memalign (POSIX implementation) kernel functions, and that was when coding low-level disk I/O. The reason for this is that when not using the OS I/O buffer ( ex. in WinOS calling openfile() with the FILE_FLAG_NO_BUFFERING flag) and reading/writing to the disk the OS requires the memory block to be aligned to the disk sector size; if the disk sector size was 512 bytes and you wanted to write 1234 bytes to disk I would do something like this:

_aligned_malloc(1234, 512);
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Have you checked the MSDN documentation? You can find the respective entry here.

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