51

Is there a standardized way to sync a collection of Model objects with a collection of matching ModelView objects in C# and WPF? I'm looking for some kind of class that would keep the following two collections synced up assuming I only have a few apples and I can keep them all in memory.

Another way to say it, I want to make sure if I add an Apple to the Apples collection I would like to have an AppleModelView added to the AppleModelViews collection. I could write my own by listening to each collections' CollectionChanged event. This seems like a common scenario that someone smarter than me has defined "the right way" to do it.

public class BasketModel
{
    public ObservableCollection<Apple> Apples { get; }
}

public class BasketModelView
{
    public ObservableCollection<AppleModelView> AppleModelViews { get; }
}
4
  • I don't understand your question entirely. I might be a little slow today but you may need to restate this.
    – Shaun Bowe
    Aug 10 '09 at 20:20
  • I added another paragraph above, I hope that helps. Aug 10 '09 at 20:29
  • Why have the seperate collections? Apple can be a subset of AppleModelView, then depending how your Apple is got only the relvant parts of the AppleModelView populated. In general I keep my Model out of WPF altogether and only have the ViewModel. The Model is the entity on the database or whatever.
    – markmnl
    Feb 16 '11 at 8:14
  • You could could also use a value converter to change the Apple into a AppleModelView during the the binding process, depends on if you want to reuse the AppleModelView in other places
    – MikeT
    Jun 2 '15 at 15:56

11 Answers 11

66

I use lazily constructed, auto-updating collections:

public class BasketModelView
{
    private readonly Lazy<ObservableCollection<AppleModelView>> _appleViews;

    public BasketModelView(BasketModel basket)
    {
        Func<AppleModel, AppleModelView> viewModelCreator = model => new AppleModelView(model);
        Func<ObservableCollection<AppleModelView>> collectionCreator =
            () => new ObservableViewModelCollection<AppleModelView, AppleModel>(basket.Apples, viewModelCreator);

        _appleViews = new Lazy<ObservableCollection<AppleModelView>>(collectionCreator);
    }

    public ObservableCollection<AppleModelView> Apples
    {
        get
        {
            return _appleViews.Value;
        }
    }
}

Using the following ObservableViewModelCollection<TViewModel, TModel>:

namespace Client.UI
{
    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
    using System.Collections.Specialized;
    using System.Diagnostics.Contracts;
    using System.Linq;

    public class ObservableViewModelCollection<TViewModel, TModel> : ObservableCollection<TViewModel>
    {
        private readonly ObservableCollection<TModel> _source;
        private readonly Func<TModel, TViewModel> _viewModelFactory;

        public ObservableViewModelCollection(ObservableCollection<TModel> source, Func<TModel, TViewModel> viewModelFactory)
            : base(source.Select(model => viewModelFactory(model)))
        {
            Contract.Requires(source != null);
            Contract.Requires(viewModelFactory != null);

            this._source = source;
            this._viewModelFactory = viewModelFactory;
            this._source.CollectionChanged += OnSourceCollectionChanged;
        }

        protected virtual TViewModel CreateViewModel(TModel model)
        {
            return _viewModelFactory(model);
        }

        private void OnSourceCollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            switch (e.Action)
            {
            case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add:
                for (int i = 0; i < e.NewItems.Count; i++)
                {
                    this.Insert(e.NewStartingIndex + i, CreateViewModel((TModel)e.NewItems[i]));
                }
                break;

            case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Move:
                if (e.OldItems.Count == 1)
                {
                    this.Move(e.OldStartingIndex, e.NewStartingIndex);
                }
                else
                {
                    List<TViewModel> items = this.Skip(e.OldStartingIndex).Take(e.OldItems.Count).ToList();
                    for (int i = 0; i < e.OldItems.Count; i++)
                        this.RemoveAt(e.OldStartingIndex);

                    for (int i = 0; i < items.Count; i++)
                        this.Insert(e.NewStartingIndex + i, items[i]);
                }
                break;

            case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Remove:
                for (int i = 0; i < e.OldItems.Count; i++)
                    this.RemoveAt(e.OldStartingIndex);
                break;

            case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Replace:
                // remove
                for (int i = 0; i < e.OldItems.Count; i++)
                    this.RemoveAt(e.OldStartingIndex);

                // add
                goto case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add;

            case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset:
                Clear();
                for (int i = 0; i < e.NewItems.Count; i++)
                    this.Add(CreateViewModel((TModel)e.NewItems[i]));
                break;

            default:
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}
10
  • For anyone using Silverlight you will need to comment out the NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Move case with something like #if !SILVERLIGHT
    – dFlat
    Nov 24 '11 at 21:09
  • 1
    in your NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Move case in the else case there can be a bug if the NewStartingIndex is > OldStartingIndex, you can fix it by adding this code: if(newIndex > e.OldStartingIndex) newIndex-=e.OldItems.Count; between the remove and the insert. Sep 18 '12 at 18:37
  • @JoãoPortela - Can you post the more of your actual change? There is no newIndex variable in the original code.
    – grantnz
    Jan 24 '13 at 2:24
  • @grantnz Take a look at this, does that clear it up? Jan 24 '13 at 17:29
  • 2
    The usage of Contracts and Lazy should be removed from this code. It brings an unnecessary complexity on this answer..
    – Maxence
    Dec 30 '16 at 9:48
10

I may not exactly understand your requirements however the way I have handled a similar situation is to use CollectionChanged event on the ObservableCollection and simply create/destroy the view models as required.

void OnApplesCollection_CollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
{    
  // Only add/remove items if already populated. 
  if (!IsPopulated)
    return;

  Apple apple;

  switch (e.Action)
  {
    case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add:
      apple = e.NewItems[0] as Apple;
      if (apple != null)
        AddViewModel(asset);
      break;
    case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Remove:
      apple = e.OldItems[0] as Apple;
      if (apple != null)
        RemoveViewModel(apple);
      break;
  }

}

There can be some performance issues when you add/remove a lot of items in a ListView.

We have solved this by: Extending the ObservableCollection to have an AddRange, RemoveRange, BinaryInsert methods and adding events that notify others the collection is being changed. Together with an extended CollectionViewSource that temporary disconnects the source when the collection is changed it works nicely.

HTH,

Dennis

4

Well first of all, I don't think there is a single "right way" to do this. It depends entirely on your application. There are more correct ways and less correct ways.

That much being said, I am wondering why you would need to keep these collections "in sync." What scenario are you considering that would make them go out of sync? If you look at the sample code from Josh Smith's MSDN article on M-V-VM, you will see that the majority of the time, the Models are kept in sync with the ViewModels simply because every time a Model is created, a ViewModel is also created. Like this:

void CreateNewCustomer()
{
    Customer newCustomer = Customer.CreateNewCustomer();
    CustomerViewModel workspace = new CustomerViewModel(newCustomer, _customerRepository);
    this.Workspaces.Add(workspace);
    this.SetActiveWorkspace(workspace);
}

I am wondering, what prevents you from creating an AppleModelView every time you create an Apple? That seems to me to be the easiest way of keeping these collections "in sync," unless I have misunderstood your question.

1
  • Thanks for the post. I was probably making this too hard in my head. I'll get back to work. Aug 11 '09 at 1:52
4

You can find an example (and explanations) here too : http://blog.lexique-du-net.com/index.php?post/2010/03/02/M-V-VM-How-to-keep-collections-of-ViewModel-and-Model-in-sync

Hope this help

1

OK I have a nerd crush on this answer so I had to share this abstract factory I added to it to support my ctor injection.

using System;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;

namespace MVVM
{
    public class ObservableVMCollectionFactory<TModel, TViewModel>
        : IVMCollectionFactory<TModel, TViewModel>
        where TModel : class
        where TViewModel : class
    {
        private readonly IVMFactory<TModel, TViewModel> _factory;

        public ObservableVMCollectionFactory( IVMFactory<TModel, TViewModel> factory )
        {
            this._factory = factory.CheckForNull();
        }

        public ObservableCollection<TViewModel> CreateVMCollectionFrom( ObservableCollection<TModel> models )
        {
            Func<TModel, TViewModel> viewModelCreator = model => this._factory.CreateVMFrom(model);
            return new ObservableVMCollection<TViewModel, TModel>(models, viewModelCreator);
        }
    }
}

Which builds off of this:

using System.Collections.ObjectModel;

namespace MVVM
{
    public interface IVMCollectionFactory<TModel, TViewModel>
        where TModel : class
        where TViewModel : class
    {
        ObservableCollection<TViewModel> CreateVMCollectionFrom( ObservableCollection<TModel> models );
    }
}

And this:

namespace MVVM
{
    public interface IVMFactory<TModel, TViewModel>
    {
        TViewModel CreateVMFrom( TModel model );
    }
}

And here is the null checker for completeness:

namespace System
{
    public static class Exceptions
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Checks for null.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="thing">The thing.</param>
        /// <param name="message">The message.</param>
        public static T CheckForNull<T>( this T thing, string message )
        {
            if ( thing == null ) throw new NullReferenceException(message);
            return thing;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Checks for null.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="thing">The thing.</param>
        public static T CheckForNull<T>( this T thing )
        {
            if ( thing == null ) throw new NullReferenceException();
            return thing;
        }
    }
}
1

While Sam Harwell's solution is pretty good already, it is subject to two problems:

  1. The event handler that is registered here this._source.CollectionChanged += OnSourceCollectionChanged is never unregistered, i.e. a this._source.CollectionChanged -= OnSourceCollectionChanged is missing.
  2. If event handlers are ever attached to events of view models generated by the viewModelFactory, there is no way of knowing when these event handlers may be detached again. (Or generally speaking: You cannot prepare the generated view models for "destruction".)

Therefore I propose a solution that fixes both (short) shortcomings of Sam Harwell's approach:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.Collections.Specialized;
using System.Diagnostics.Contracts;
using System.Linq;

namespace Helpers
{
    public class ObservableViewModelCollection<TViewModel, TModel> : ObservableCollection<TViewModel>
    {
        private readonly Func<TModel, TViewModel> _viewModelFactory;
        private readonly Action<TViewModel> _viewModelRemoveHandler;
        private ObservableCollection<TModel> _source;

        public ObservableViewModelCollection(Func<TModel, TViewModel> viewModelFactory, Action<TViewModel> viewModelRemoveHandler = null)
        {
            Contract.Requires(viewModelFactory != null);

            _viewModelFactory = viewModelFactory;
            _viewModelRemoveHandler = viewModelRemoveHandler;
        }

        public ObservableCollection<TModel> Source
        {
            get { return _source; }
            set
            {
                if (_source == value)
                    return;

                this.ClearWithHandling();

                if (_source != null)
                    _source.CollectionChanged -= OnSourceCollectionChanged;

                _source = value;

                if (_source != null)
                {
                    foreach (var model in _source)
                    {
                        this.Add(CreateViewModel(model));
                    }
                    _source.CollectionChanged += OnSourceCollectionChanged;
                }
            }
        }

        private void OnSourceCollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            switch (e.Action)
            {
                case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add:
                    for (int i = 0; i < e.NewItems.Count; i++)
                    {
                        this.Insert(e.NewStartingIndex + i, CreateViewModel((TModel)e.NewItems[i]));
                    }
                    break;

                case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Move:
                    if (e.OldItems.Count == 1)
                    {
                        this.Move(e.OldStartingIndex, e.NewStartingIndex);
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        List<TViewModel> items = this.Skip(e.OldStartingIndex).Take(e.OldItems.Count).ToList();
                        for (int i = 0; i < e.OldItems.Count; i++)
                            this.RemoveAt(e.OldStartingIndex);

                        for (int i = 0; i < items.Count; i++)
                            this.Insert(e.NewStartingIndex + i, items[i]);
                    }
                    break;

                case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Remove:
                    for (int i = 0; i < e.OldItems.Count; i++)
                        this.RemoveAtWithHandling(e.OldStartingIndex);
                    break;

                case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Replace:
                    // remove
                    for (int i = 0; i < e.OldItems.Count; i++)
                        this.RemoveAtWithHandling(e.OldStartingIndex);

                    // add
                    goto case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add;

                case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset:
                    this.ClearWithHandling();
                    if (e.NewItems == null)
                        break;
                    for (int i = 0; i < e.NewItems.Count; i++)
                        this.Add(CreateViewModel((TModel)e.NewItems[i]));
                    break;

                default:
                    break;
            }
        }

        private void RemoveAtWithHandling(int index)
        {
            _viewModelRemoveHandler?.Invoke(this[index]);
            this.RemoveAt(index);
        }

        private void ClearWithHandling()
        {
            if (_viewModelRemoveHandler != null)
            {
                foreach (var item in this)
                {
                    _viewModelRemoveHandler(item);
                }
            }

            this.Clear();
        }

        private TViewModel CreateViewModel(TModel model)
        {
            return _viewModelFactory(model);
        }
    }
}

To deal with the first of the two problems, you can simply set Source to null in order to get rid of the CollectionChanged event handler.

To deal with the second of the two problems, you can simply add a viewModelRemoveHandler that allows to to "prepare your object for destruction", e.g. by removing any event handlers attached to it.

4
  • I also noticed that when getting a Reset, e.NewItems might be null sometimes. I just added code to handle this case as well.
    – Hauke P.
    May 20 '16 at 8:12
  • Can you provide a quick example on how you'd implement a viewModelRemoveHandler ? May 31 '20 at 16:50
  • Phew, it's been too long to produce a working example in a short time span. If I remember correctly, I passed a function as second argument to the constructor. This function removed all the events that were attached to the view model. Does that help?
    – Hauke P.
    Jun 6 '20 at 17:33
  • Yeah - I surmised that was what it was, but I was hoping you had a good example. Sorry for the four year necropost! Thanks anyway! Jun 16 '20 at 22:54
1

The «Using MVVM to provide undo/redo. Part 2: Viewmodelling lists» article provides the MirrorCollection<V, D> class to achieve the view-model and model collections synchronization.

Additional references

  1. Original link (currently, it is not available): Notify Changed » Blog Archive » Using MVVM to provide undo/redo. Part 2: Viewmodelling lists.
2
0

I've written some helper classes for wrapping observable collections of business objects in their View Model counterparts here

0

I really like 280Z28's solution. Just one remark. Is it necessary to do the loops for each NotifyCollectionChangedAction? I know that the docs for the actions state "one or more items" but since ObservableCollection itself does not support adding or removing ranges, this can never happen I would think.

4
  • Totally off topic but are you known as Bert Vermeire?
    – El Ronnoco
    Dec 14 '10 at 16:38
  • No I'm not, the 'h' wouldn't make sense :)
    – bertvh
    Jan 16 '11 at 16:08
  • ObservableCollection does support multiple items, I believe that it is WPF that basically doesn't support multiple items within a single change event.
    – jpierson
    May 16 '13 at 3:21
  • @jpierson: ObservableCollection does support multiple removes (i.e. clear) but not adds i admit that an AddRange method would be useful but by forcing it to a add one at a time they force a lower response time onto monitoring GUI elements. reducing the likelihood of locking because someone added 10000 elements at once to an listview
    – MikeT
    Jun 2 '15 at 15:41
0

Resetting an collection to a default value or to match a target value is something i've hit quite frequently

i Wrote a small helper class of Miscilanious methods that includes

public static class Misc
    {
        public static void SyncCollection<TCol,TEnum>(ICollection<TCol> collection,IEnumerable<TEnum> source, Func<TCol,TEnum,bool> comparer, Func<TEnum, TCol> converter )
        {
            var missing = collection.Where(c => !source.Any(s => comparer(c, s))).ToArray();
            var added = source.Where(s => !collection.Any(c => comparer(c, s))).ToArray();

            foreach (var item in missing)
            {
                collection.Remove(item);
            }
            foreach (var item in added)
            {
                collection.Add(converter(item));
            }
        }
        public static void SyncCollection<T>(ICollection<T> collection, IEnumerable<T> source, EqualityComparer<T> comparer)
        {
            var missing = collection.Where(c=>!source.Any(s=>comparer.Equals(c,s))).ToArray();
            var added = source.Where(s => !collection.Any(c => comparer.Equals(c, s))).ToArray();

            foreach (var item in missing)
            {
                collection.Remove(item);
            }
            foreach (var item in added)
            {
                collection.Add(item);
            }
        }
        public static void SyncCollection<T>(ICollection<T> collection, IEnumerable<T> source)
        {
            SyncCollection(collection,source, EqualityComparer<T>.Default);
        }
    }

which covers most of my needs the first would probably be most applicable as your also converting types

note: this only Syncs the elements in the collection not the values inside them

-1

This is a slight variation on Sam Harwell's answer, implementing IReadOnlyCollection<> and INotifyCollectionChanged instead of inheriting from ObservableCollection<> directly. This prevents consumers from modifying the collection, which wouldn't generally be desired in this scenario.

This implementation also uses CollectionChangedEventManager to attach the event handler to the source collection to avoid a memory leak if the source collection is not disposed at the same time as the mirrored collection.

/// <summary>
/// A collection that mirrors an <see cref="ObservableCollection{T}"/> source collection 
/// with a transform function to create it's own elements.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="TSource">The type of elements in the source collection.</typeparam>
/// <typeparam name="TDest">The type of elements in this collection.</typeparam>
public class MappedObservableCollection<TSource, TDest>
    : IReadOnlyCollection<TDest>, INotifyCollectionChanged
{
    /// <inheritdoc/>
    public int Count => _mappedCollection.Count;

    /// <inheritdoc/>
    public event NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler CollectionChanged {
        add { _mappedCollection.CollectionChanged += value; }
        remove { _mappedCollection.CollectionChanged -= value; }
    }

    private readonly Func<TSource, TDest> _elementMapper;
    private readonly ObservableCollection<TDest> _mappedCollection;

    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="MappedObservableCollection{TSource, TDest}"/> class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sourceCollection">The source collection whose elements should be mapped into this collection.</param>
    /// <param name="elementMapper">Function to map elements from the source collection to this collection.</param>
    public MappedObservableCollection(ObservableCollection<TSource> sourceCollection, Func<TSource, TDest> elementMapper)
    {
        if (sourceCollection == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(sourceCollection));
        _mappedCollection = new ObservableCollection<TDest>(sourceCollection.Select(elementMapper));

        _elementMapper = elementMapper ?? throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(elementMapper));

        // Update the mapped collection whenever the source collection changes
        // NOTE: Use the weak event pattern here to avoid a memory leak
        // See: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/framework/wpf/advanced/weak-event-patterns
        CollectionChangedEventManager.AddHandler(sourceCollection, OnSourceCollectionChanged);
    }

    /// <inheritdoc/>
    IEnumerator<TDest> IEnumerable<TDest>.GetEnumerator()
        => _mappedCollection.GetEnumerator();

    /// <inheritdoc/>
    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        => _mappedCollection.GetEnumerator();

    /// <summary>
    /// Mirror a change event in the source collection into the internal mapped collection.
    /// </summary>
    private void OnSourceCollectionChanged(object sender, NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        switch (e.Action) {
            case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Add:
                InsertItems(e.NewItems, e.NewStartingIndex);
                break;
            case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Remove:
                RemoveItems(e.OldItems, e.OldStartingIndex);
                break;
            case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Replace:
                RemoveItems(e.OldItems, e.OldStartingIndex);
                InsertItems(e.NewItems, e.NewStartingIndex);
                break;
            case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Reset:
                _mappedCollection.Clear();
                InsertItems(e.NewItems, 0);
                break;
            case NotifyCollectionChangedAction.Move:
                if (e.OldItems.Count == 1) {
                    _mappedCollection.Move(e.OldStartingIndex, e.NewStartingIndex);
                } else {
                    RemoveItems(e.OldItems, e.OldStartingIndex);

                    var movedItems = _mappedCollection.Skip(e.OldStartingIndex).Take(e.OldItems.Count).GetEnumerator();
                    for (int i = 0; i < e.OldItems.Count; i++) {
                        _mappedCollection.Insert(e.NewStartingIndex + i, movedItems.Current);
                        movedItems.MoveNext();
                    }
                }

                break;
        }
    }

    private void InsertItems(IList newItems, int newStartingIndex)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < newItems.Count; i++)
            _mappedCollection.Insert(newStartingIndex + i, _elementMapper((TSource)newItems[i]));
    }

    private void RemoveItems(IList oldItems, int oldStartingIndex)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < oldItems.Count; i++)
            _mappedCollection.RemoveAt(oldStartingIndex);
    }
}

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